$40 – $45

Outline: Fall

21+

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$40 – $45

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Knockdown Center

52-19 Flushing Ave

Queens, NY 11378

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Outline: Fall featuring Julia Holter, Matthew E. White & Lonnie Holley, Florist, Emily A. Sprague, Bing & Ruth, and Rachika Nayar on 11.20.

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Outline: Fall  will return inside Knockdown Center’s main hall to present a captivating blend of indie-rock, folk, and experimental music across multiple stages.

Julia Holter

Los Angeles-based composer/multi-instrumentalist Julia Holter blurs the boundaries between indie music, modern composition, and electronic music. On early releases such as 2011’s Tragedy, she combined bedroom recordings of droning electronics and distant vocals with inspirations as cultured as Euripidies’ play Hippolytus. On every album, the scope of her music grew; she incorporated chamber pop and the words of Virginia Woolf and Frank O’Hara on 2012’s Ekstasis and engaged with Gigi—both Colette’s short story and Vincent Minelli’s 1958 film—on 2013’s bustling Loud City Song. Holter’s embrace of traditional pop structures reached a peak on 2015’s acclaimed Have You in My Wilderness, but with 2018’s double album Aviary, she underscored just how vital experimentation was to her ambitious, uncompromising music.

Matthew E. White & Lonnie Holley

In November 2018, Matthew E. White wanted to reinvent his approach to songwriting, at least for a session. In the throes of shaping the follow-up to his second studio album, 2015’s Fresh Blood, White assembled a trusted posse of seven musicians in Richmond’s Montrose Recording, one of his favorite spaces in the city. He directed the septet through a series of loose, largely gestural compositions, guiding their spirited improvisations in the iconoclastic tradition of Electric Miles.

The sounds were tremendous, an array of keyboards and guitars bejeweling the momentum of an interlocking four-piece rhythm section. But the results didn’t quite fit the record in process, so White shelved the jams until the right muse arrived. That, turns out, was Lonnie Holley, whose beautifully wizened voice soon spilled a kind of cosmic wisdom across White’s waiting work. The result—the five-track triumph Broken Mirror: A Selfie Reflection—is more explosive and urgent than anything either artist has ever made. Aggressive but ecstatic, playful but pointed, Broken Mirror is a trenchant though empathetic social critique, set to almighty groove.

Holley and White may seem like unlikely collaborators, divided as they are by decades and disciplines. Holley, 70, first earned attention as a sculptor far removed from the fiefdom of fine art, using society’s detritus to create curious bricolages that ferried deep narratives of ancestral pride, enduring pain, and eternal hope. But the pair shares deep Alabama roots—Holley was born in Birmingham, while much of White’s family remains just south of the city, a sort of second childhood home. More important, Holley and White regard music as an uncanny vessel for otherwise-impenetrable notions of sorrow, suffering, and solidarity.

Florist

Florist is a collaborative folk-pop project, led by songwriter Emily A. Sprague. A precocious songwriter talent from her teen years on, Sprague moved to Brooklyn in 2013 and quickly gathered notable scene musicians together to record the sweetly hushed bedroom melodies of the band’s first two LPs. With 2019’s Emily, Alone, Sprague’s songwriting took a darker, more personal turn, resulting in the best reviews (and songs) of her career to date.

"Her singing is frail but determined on this album, which hits like an intense whisper. She finds strength in her weaknesses and ruminates about a personal identity that’s ever changing: “I was born a boy with many opinions/and now I’m a girl who doesn’t really care about anything.”

- The New York Times.

"Emily Sprague’s folk music turns solitude into an evocation of spirits. Her latest album as Florist grapples with change, death, and uncertainty with some of the most arresting songwriting of the year." - Pitchfork

Emily A. Sprague

Outside of Florist, Sprague is also the creator of acclaimed ambient compositions, which she will be presenting at Outline: Fall.

“[Sprague] elicits more clearly defined tones from her modular synths. Pinging brightly, they trace lazy circles in the air, carrying a suggestion of windchimes and woodland flutes, along with all the pastoral reverie those sounds evoke. Recorded during a single week in March, when the reality of the pandemic was just settling in for many in the U.S., the album is meant, she has said, “as a soundtrack to these new days, practices, distances, losses, ends, and beginnings.” Still, the tonalities tend toward major keys, and the textures are uniformly gentle; in response to upheaval, Sprague offers an abiding sense of balance.” - Pitchfork

Bing & Ruth

In 2006, David Moore started Bing & Ruth as a way to bring his compositions to an audience beyond academia. A pianist from Kansas, studying at the New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music in New York’s Greenwich Village, Moore was writing the sort of music he wanted to hear: minimalist ensemble music with a certain filmic sensitivity, one that prioritized grace and texture over the style’s once-radical subtraction.

2014’s Tomorrow Was the Golden Age distilled minimalism’s most emotive moments down to artful melodies with a heavy, heartbreaking affect. The album brought the band a newfound acclaim as it made waves around the underground community, reviving interest in the meditative pop traditions of Philip Glass and Harold Budd, stretching so-called “classical” music to new limits, and proving that there was in fact a committed audience for this sort of thoughtful contemporary composition. The album was even named “one of the finest leftfield releases of the year" by Pitchfork and earned similar praise from The Quietus and Resident Advisor.

The group’s fourth studio album, Species, was released on July 17th, 2020.

Rachika Nayar

Rachika Nayar is a Brooklyn-based composer and producer, who crafts her music from processed guitar along with other synthesized and other multi-instrumental sounds. Her music has been featured in venues and publications including The New York Times, Pitchfork, NPR, New York Magazine, the Berlinale International Film Festival, and The Shed in Hudson Yards.

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Knockdown Center

52-19 Flushing Ave

Queens, NY 11378

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No Refunds

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Organizer Knockdown Center

Organizer of Outline: Fall

Art, performance + music space in Queens NY dedicated to cross-disciplinary projects + collaborations.

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