$10 – $12

Orindal Records Showcase at the Hideout

21+

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Hideout Inn

1354 W. Wabansia Ave.

Chicago, IL 60642

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8PM DOORS | 8:30PM SHOW | 21+

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Orindal Records

https://orindal.limitedrun.com/

This December showcase features Advance Base, Friendship, and Ruth Garbis

Advance Base

Owen Ashworth’s albums have always been about the human condition, and his latest is no exception. That may sound strange, given that it’s called Animal Companionship, but it’s as human as anything he’s done before.

After hearing problems forced the end of his electronic pop project Casiotone for the Painfully Alone in 2010, Ashworth started making quieter music as Advance Base, releasing A Shut-In’s Prayer in 2012, Nephew In The Wild in 2015 and a slew of tapes and 7” EPs in between. After releasing a 2016 live album, In Bloomington, the prodigious songwriter shifted his focus to his label, Orindal Records, and put his efforts into helping other artists release their music.

This break from songwriting gave him time to explore not just how he makes music, but why he’s driven to do so. “I spent a lot of time thinking about why I write songs and what I get out of writing songs,” he said. “It took a while to get back to writing for myself, unselfconsciously.

“The reason I’ve always made music is because it’s therapeutic for me,” he said. “It’s a way of processing my feelings and understanding my subconscious. I love the ritual of writing a song and performing it over and over again until its meaning reveals itself. It’s the closest I get to meditation.”

The meditative nature of Ashworth’s new songwriting process can be heard in Animal Companionship’s spacious arrangements. Blissful drones and lush synthesizer textures envelop soft electric piano arpeggiations and spare drum programming, creating an almost hypnotic backdrop for Ashworth’s lyrical narratives. And the lyrics themselves have found a new focus: dogs.

“There was a while last year when a bunch of different friends of mine were having problems with their dogs,” said Ashworth, “and even though I don’t have a dog, suddenly I was giving all of this dog advice. I was just thinking and worrying about these friends and their dogs all of the time, and dogs just started showing up in my songs.

“When you explain the relationship you have with a pet, it can sound crazy. We all tend to anthropomorphize the animals we love, talking about them as if they're children, siblings, even spouses,” said Ashworth. “I wrote these songs to help myself understand what pets mean to their owners, how those animal relationships affect our human relationships, and vice versa.”

Unlike the previous Advance Base albums, which were made at home on Ashworth’s trusty 4-track tape machine, Animal Companionship was mostly recorded at Palmetto Studios in Los Angeles with Ashworth’s old friend and former Casiotone for the Painfully Alone collaborator Jason Quever. Animal Companionship still sounds like Ashworth, but Quever’s production adds more depth and clarity than you’ve ever heard from an Advance Base or Casiotone album. The album opener, “True Love Death Dream,” is full of warm synthesizer textures and lush drum machine tones, the kind that sink deep into your soul and take root there. It shows how much time and consideration Ashworth put into Animal Companionship, and how Quever knew exactly how to capture it. From the pedal steel atmospherics of “Dolores & Kimberly” to the densely layered oscillations of “Rabbits,” every movement beautifully frames each song’s narrative. Animal Companionship’s production is expansive but always deliberate, allowing Ashworth to speak volumes through subtle, emotional gestures.

Taken as a whole, Animal Companionship is not just a step forward for Advance Base—it’s the culmination of everything Ashworth has been building for the past two decades. It’s a record that’s gentle in approach and endearing in practice, the kind of thing that only Ashworth could create.

Friendship (PA)

"Friendship are a Philly-based band centered around Dan Wriggins’ narrative pull. His stories tend to be long-winded but confined to small moments, and the rest of the band — currently made up of Peter Gill, Mike Cormier, Evangeline Krajewski, and Jon Samuels — play into this in an unobtrusive but all-encompassing way." - Stereogum

Onstage, bassist Jon Samuels is the only Friendship member who stands up. He is usually swaying back and forth as the songs bear down, pulling together and apart. Friendship’s new record, Dreamin’ (out Nov 8th on Orindal Records) is an exorable wave of motion, endlessly rocking between intimacy and loneliness.

The contemplative alt-country songs on Dreamin’ were recorded to tape in July last year with the help of The Low Anthem’s Jeff Prystowsky. The band moved away from the inclusion of digitally programmed drums and Rhodes piano for Dreamin’, opting instead for a warmer, more organic aesthetic and a starker performance. Most of the songs on Dreamin’ took shape while Dan Wriggins (vocals and guitar) and Mike Cormier (drums) worked and lived as groundskeepers at a private estate in Swarthmore, Pennsylvania, frequently driving into Philadelphia for shows and friends. The record is set both in the country and the city – community, peacefulness, and isolation can all be heard and felt throughout the superb new record.

Friendship have retained a loyal cult following since their first offering in 2015, You’re Going to Have to Trust Me, which was released on Burst and Bloom Records that year. The F/V Hope EP on Sleeper Records and another record on their current label Orindal Records followed in 2017 – the acclaimed Shock Out of Season, bringing us forward to late 2019; when they will release their wonderful new album Dreamin’ on 8th November again via Orindal Records.

The songs of Dreamin’ are immediate yet gentle. They explore human signs and meaning and are as equally driven by moments of love and connection as they are by our total unknowing, even to those closest to us. In Not an Exit, the driver-narrator asks their passenger: “Can you see those cloudy symbols? / One for fine, two for miserable / three might stand for not insurmountable.” The language is unclear. The message is variable. The characters of Dreamin’ reflect our abiding search for love and understanding.

Elsewhere, lead single Clairvoyant is a thank you note to a friend who offered support during a tough period; “You asked if I’d been crying lately / I said “how can you tell?” / You said “I’m clairvoyant, baby”

Talking about the track, Wriggins said: “I wrote “Clairvoyant” a couple days after seeing Willie Nelson perform in Camden, New Jersey at the BB&T Pavilion. My friend Mark had won tickets from a radio station, but had to bail the day before, so he gave me the tickets and I went alone. This is only tangentially represented in the action of the song. But I think it’s pertinent given Willie’s (and one or two others’) creepy ability to read minds.”

The lilting Dusky is a moving and shrewd account of the push and pull that occurs between two people figuring out how to be together, framed by the opening lines: “Blessed is the front porch / and your six Pabsts.” “My apartment in Philadelphia has a nice porch on a busy street. I love sitting there with a beer and my dog, Roy, and talking with friends, and watching people. There was a guy named Phil who would sit on his porch across the street and sing at the top of his lungs all day long. When people bothered him he would yell “I’m just out here trying to save my life.” Phil’s gone now, I don’t know where he went, I hope he didn’t die. I am generally clueless about what’s going on. The song is about the difficulty and wonder I’ve found in relationships with people with superhuman observational skills.” said Wriggins, reflecting on the song.

The lauded songwriter’s lyrics touch on both the smallest and the most significant moments that occur within human interaction. He reflects on those moments with a sharp wit, keenly observing and eloquently putting into words the unimportant twists and turns that over time become important – that become our experiences, our relationships, our lives. Dreamin’ offers hope with one hand and takes it away with the other. Immersed within swathes of lush Americana guitars, keys, soft, expressive drums and the haunting wail of a pedal steel, on Dreamin’, Friendship sounds more like Friendship than ever before.

Ruth Garbis (VT)

To me her songs reaffirm the power of music itself and its basic elements - big and small intervals placed just so in time, the play of sound and meaning in words, parts put together without force or artifice. Ruth is one of my favorite singer-songwriters ever. - Chris Cohen

Kleinmeister, the new album by Ruth Garbus, is a rarity, the holy wastewater of folk-rock decanted into the Lake of Avalon by a provincial plebe, turned into wine. It is sublime, and absurd, and infused with the green hills, grey cemeteries, and plastic detritus of her Brattleboro, Vermont home.

These compositions come from an odd but familiar world, chiaroscuro silver litter in the beam of a flashlight. In Garbus’s voice, too, the dark and light are combined - even the highest pitches contain pools of undertones, a depth. (She became fully expressed as a mezzo soprano, in both her range and her soul, with the aid of opera singer Jim Anderson, whom she studied with in 2017/18.)

The first track of Kleinmeister is “Strash,” a sensual ode inspired by the book Garbage Land by Elizabeth Royte, with unison singing by Julia Tadlock. This is followed by “Pain,” which builds in size and scope toward a kind of operatic emo-political drama, and achieves levitation with piano played by Travis Laplante (Battle Trance, Subtle Degrees), who also acted as producer, and additional production by Ryan Power, who mixed the album.

From there, Kleinmeister moves into barer bones, highlighting Garbus's resonant voice, rhythmic guitar, and the impeccable recording quality - it was recorded to two-inch tape at Guilford Sound in Guilford, VT by Dave Snyder. Sparse, skewed harmonies, sometimes sung by Tadlock, lilt throughout. The final track, “Fetty Wah,” features Laplante again, this time on tenor saxophone, with improvised melody lines that uplift but still contain a bit of the sorrow of the world.

Garbus’s prior solo recordings - 2010's Rendezvous with Rama LP and the EP’s Ruthie's Requests, Joule EP, and Hello Everybody - have been released on Burger Records, Autumn Records, Feeding Tube Records, and OSR Tapes. Currently, in addition to her solo performances, she improvises vocally with an experimental quintet featuring Wendy Eisenberg, Donny Shaw, Neil Young, and Andy Allen. She was previously in the bands Happy Birthday and Feathers.

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Hideout Inn

1354 W. Wabansia Ave.

Chicago, IL 60642

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