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How do you see me? Panel Discussion

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300 West Superior Street

Chicago, IL 60654

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We are pleased to present a panel discussion, in conjunction with our upcoming gallery exhibition, How do you see me?, that addresses issues about race, gender, and bias within the arts and the workplace. Distinguished panelists include Alanna Airitam, Sheridan Tucker Anderson, Jeffreen Hayes, and Kate Lorenz. Catherine Edelman will moderate the conversation, held at 300 West Superior Street (3rd floor) on Thursday, October 18. Doors open at 5:30 pm. Guests are encouraged to visit the show at Catherine Edelman Gallery (lower level) in advance of the discussion, as well as the exhibition on view at Weinberg/Newton Gallery in partnership with My Block, My Hood, My City: Block Building. The discussion will begin at 6:00 pm with a reception to follow at Catherine Edelman Gallery.

Update: In the event that we reach our ticketed limit, seats at the venue will remain first-come, first-served. Please feel free to join us early on October 18 even if you were unable to RSVP with Eventbrite.

How do you see me? brings together work by three women who confront the way African Americans are perceived in art, the work place, and through their physical appearance. How do you see me? features photographs by Alanna Airitam, Endia Beal and Medina Dugger. Each artist’s work will be presented in a unique and non-traditional manner. The show opens September 7 and runs through October 27, 2018.


About the panelists:

Alanna Aritiam is one of three artists featured in How do you see me? As a self-taught fine art photographer, Airitam creates portraits that help shift stagnant (and often negative) narratives about communities of color and other misrepresented and/or underrepresented people. Using photography as her delivery system, she offers the audience a look into a reality that is not based upon the limiting constraints of narrow media messaging about people of color but instead offers a glimpse into her belief about the necessity and beauty of diversity in culture. Airitam has recently participated in the San Diego Art Institute exhibition titled ABOUT-FACE. She was also the subject of a short film titled “From Haarlem to Harlem” about her series, The Golden Age, and has been featured in numerous publications, podcasts and speaking events around the subject of representation of people of color in the arts.

Sheridan Tucker Anderson is a Chicago based curator and art historian who explores cultural phenomena through visual art. With close study in both Postwar American and Contemporary Art, Anderson seeks to introduce new ideas of inclusion into the art historical canon. She has curated exhibitions at the School of the Art institute of Chicago, the Ryerson & Burnham Libraries at the Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago Artists Coalition, the Museum of Contemporary Photography, as well as supported exhibitions at the Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts, the Museum of Contemporary Photography and the Art Institute of Chicago. From 2014 to 2016 she served as the inaugural Andrew W. Mellon Undergraduate Curatorial Fellow at the Art Institute of Chicago. From 2016 to 2018, she served as curatorial research assistant at the Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts at the University of Chicago, there she supported the Andy Warhol Foundation funded project The Ties that Bind Waves of Pan-Africanism in Contemporary Art and Society. She recently served as curatorial resident at the Chicago Artists Coalition’s HATCH Project. Currently, she serves as Curatorial Fellow for Diversity in the Arts at the Museum of Contemporary Photography where she works to diversify the museum’s collection and serves as research assistant for the Terra Funded exhibition The Many Hats of Ralph Arnold: Art, Identity and Politics. Recent publications include: Bordering the Imaginary: Ralph Arnold, Napoleon Bonaparte, andThe Hawaii Days” series (2018) and Of Memories and Forgetfulness (2017). Recent exhibitions include In Their Own Form: Contemporary Photography + Afrofuturism and Superficial Paradise. She holds a BA in Visual and Critical Studies from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and an MA in Art History from the University of Chicago.

Jeffreen M. Hayes, PhD a trained art historian and curator, merges administrative, curatorial and academic practices into her cultural practice of supporting artists and community development. As an advocate for racial inclusion, equity and access, Jeffreen has developed a curatorial and leadership approach that invites community participation, particularly those in marginalized communities. Her curatorial projects include Intimate Interiors (2012), Etched in Collective History (2013), SILOS (2016), Augusta Savage: Renaissance Woman (2018), and AfriCOBRA: Messages to the People (2018), and Process (2019). Additionally, she served a guest curator for Artpace San Antonio’s International Artist-in-Residence program from May 2018-August 2018.

As the Executive Director of Threewalls, a position she has held since 2015, Jeffreen provides strategic vision for the artistic direction and impact of the organization in Chicago. Under her leadership, Threewalls intentionally develops artistic platforms that encourages connections beyond traditional engagements with art. These engagements help manifest the organization’s vision of art connecting segregated communities, people and experiences together.

Jeffreen earned a Ph.D. in American Studies from the College of William and Mary, a MA in Art History from Howard University, and a BA from Florida International University in Humanities. She has worked several museums and cultural institutions including Birmingham Museum of Art, Hampton University Museum, Library of Congress and the National Gallery of Art. Jeffreen held fellowships at Ithaca College in the Art History department and in the Cartoon and Caricature Division at Library of Congress as a Swann Foundation Fellow. Jeffreen is a Chief Executive Community and Culture Fellow alum, a program facilitated by National Arts Strategies.

Kate Lorenz is Hyde Park Art Center’s Executive Director, a role she assumed in January 2010. Previously, she was the Art Center’s Associate Director. Kate is committed to supporting artists and to building a diverse community of people who support them. A native of Nashville, TN, she has been fully converted into a Chicagoan. She has a BA in Mathematical Methods in the Social Sciences and Psychology from Northwestern University and received her MA in Humanities at the University of Chicago. She was a founding member and board member of Enrich Chicago, a collective of arts organizations in Chicago working towards racial equity in the field, and is an adjunct faculty at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in the Masters of Arts Administration and Policy program. She has served on the Auxiliary Board of High Jump Chicago, as Docent President at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, and on the board of the Development Leadership Consortium. Past experience includes working as a Management Consultant for PwC Consulting in Chicago.

About the moderator:

Catherine Edelman opened her Chicago gallery 31 years ago after completing her MFA in Photography at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Since its founding in 1987, the gallery quickly established itself as one of the leading galleries in the Midwest devoted to the exhibition of prominent contemporary photographers alongside local, new & young talent, showcasing a broad range of subject matter. The gallery exhibits in major art fairs throughout the country and is widely respected as a leader, educator and specialist in the field of contemporary photography. Catherine Edelman is an active member of the Association of International Photography Art Dealers (AIPAD) and currently serves as its president.

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300 West Superior Street

Chicago, IL 60654

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