Free

Disrupting The "Jezebel" Stereotype: MEASURE Community Data-Gathering

Event Information

Share this event

Date and Time

Location

Location

Huston-Tillotson University

900 Chicon Street

Dickey Lawless Auditorium

Austin, TX 78702

View Map

Event description
Join MEASURE for a community discussion and data-gathering on the impacts and repercussions perpetuated by the "Jezebel" stereotype.

About this Event

Join MEASURE for a community discussion and data-gathering on the impacts and repercussions perpetuated by the "Jezebel" stereotype.

Located in the Dickey-Lawless Auditorium at Huston-Tillotson University

Healthy Food will be provided. Children are typically welcome at all MEASURE’s meetings, however, this conversation may be inappropriate for young people.

The Georgetown Law Center on Poverty and Inequality's groundbreaking study, Girlhood Interrupted: The Erasure of Black Girls’ Childhood provides—for the first time— data showing that adults view Black girls as less innocent and more adult-like than their white peers, especially in the age range of 5–14.

The Innocence Initiative seeks to eliminate the adultification of girls of color in Central Texas. We consider adultification “a social or cultural stereotype that is based on how adults perceive children in the absence of knowledge of children’s behavior and verbalization,” as defined in Girlhood Interrupted: The Erasure of Black Girls’ Childhood by Georgetown University.

This project puts national academic research to local action whereby the community that is most impacted by the disparity is mobilized to do something about it in a meaningful & collaborative way. We will evaluate this work and produce a body of evidence of what worked so that it can be applied in other cities.

NOTES:

The portrayal of black women and girls as lascivious by nature is an enduring stereotype. The descriptive words associated with this stereotype are singular in their focus: seductive, alluring, worldly, beguiling, tempting, and lewd. Historically, white women, as a category, were portrayed as models of self-respect, self-control, and modesty - even sexual purity, but black women were often portrayed as innately promiscuous, even predatory. This depiction of black women and girls is signified by the name Jezebel.1 From the early 1630s to the present, black American women of all shades have been portrayed as hypersexual "bad-black-girls."2

Empowering Partners:

Impact Austin is a local charity comprised of more than 500 women seeking to transform lives in the Greater Austin area through high-impact and lifelong giving. Its only membership requirements are to be female and donate $1,250 each year. Impact Austin combines the annual donations from members and awards large grants each year to local worthy causes selected by its members. Since 2003, Impact Austin has donated more than $6 million to worthy Austin-area nonprofit organizations.

We also want to thank St. David’s Foundation for their support of The Innocence Initiative and of MEASURE! St. David’s Foundation works to create healthier lives for all Central Texans by addressing the region’s top health challenges.

Georgetown Law’s Center on Poverty and Inequality released its paper on Adultification, titled Girlhood Interrupted: The Erasure of Black Girls’ Childhood. This study explores the perception of Black girls as less innocent and less in need of nurturing or protection than their white peers. We are happy to announce their support as researchers with the Innocence Initiative.

Works Cited:

1The most infamous Jezebel was a Phoenician princess who married Ahab, king of Israel, in the 9th century B.C. As queen she introduced the worship of Baal and sought to suppress the worship of Yahweh (Jehovah), the Hebrew God. She persecuted the prophets of Jehovah, many of whom she ordered to be killed. Her disregard for Jewish custom and her ruthless use of royal power are illustrated in the story involving Naboth, a Jezreelite. Jezebel falsely accused Naboth of treason. He was stoned to death. Then, she and Ahab took possession of Naboth's vineyard. Her reign as queen was marked by similarly deceitful actions. The name Jezebel came to signify a deceitful and immoral woman. Her story is told in First Kings 18 and 19, and in Second Kings 9. In the New Testament book Revelations (2:20) the name Jezebel is used as a byword for apostasy.

2Jewell (1993) uses "bad-black-girls" as a synonym for Black Jezebels.

Works Cited:

1The most infamous Jezebel was a Phoenician princess who married Ahab, king of Israel, in the 9th century B.C. As queen she introduced the worship of Baal and sought to suppress the worship of Yahweh (Jehovah), the Hebrew God. She persecuted the prophets of Jehovah, many of whom she ordered to be killed. Her disregard for Jewish custom and her ruthless use of royal power are illustrated in the story involving Naboth, a Jezreelite. Jezebel falsely accused Naboth of treason. He was stoned to death. Then, she and Ahab took possession of Naboth's vineyard. Her reign as queen was marked by similarly deceitful actions. The name Jezebel came to signify a deceitful and immoral woman. Her story is told in First Kings 18 and 19, and in Second Kings 9. In the New Testament book Revelations (2:20) the name Jezebel is used as a byword for apostasy.

2Jewell (1993) uses "bad-black-girls" as a synonym for Black Jezebels.

Share with friends

Date and Time

Location

Huston-Tillotson University

900 Chicon Street

Dickey Lawless Auditorium

Austin, TX 78702

View Map

Save This Event

Event Saved