Why Zip Code Matters: The Effects of Residential Segregation on Education
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Why Zip Code Matters: The Effects of Residential Segregation on Education

Why Zip Code Matters: The Effects of Residential Segregation on Education

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Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University, Moot Court Room

78 North Broadway

White Plains, NY 10603

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Join Westchester Residential Opportunities for our 2016 Symposium, Why Zip Code Matters: The Effects of Residential Segregation on Education.

Panelists Include:

F. Willis Caruso, Co-Executive Director (Ret.) The John Marshall Law Schol Fair Housing Legal Support Center & Clinic and Clinical Professor of Law at John Marshall. Professor Caruso is a graduate of Northwestern University and Northwestern Law School. He formerly practiced law with Sidley & Austin; Caruso & Caruso; Isham Lincoln & Beale; and Keck, Mahin & Cate. He served as the General Counsel for the Chicago Housing Authority from 1991 to 1994 and General Counsel for the Leadership Council on Metropolitan Open Communities from 1970 to 1991. Professor Caruso has litigated over 1,000 fair housing cases, including the Village of Arlington Heights v. Metropolitan Housing Development Corporation, and Gladstone Realtors v. Village of Bellwood. He has lectured at large-number legal seminars and also authored many outlines, pamphlets, articles, and a textbook entitled Cases and Materials on Fair Housing and Fair Lending Law, Sixth Edition, 2009.

Cora Greenberg, Executive Director of Westchester Children's Association. Cora Greenberg, a social worker and educator, joined the Westchester Children’s Association as Executive Director in 1994. Ms. Greenberg holds an MSW degree from Hunter College School of Social Work and an MSEd in Elementary Education from the University of Wisconsin at Madison, and a BA from SUNY Binghamton. Immediately prior to joining WCA in 1994, Ms. Greenberg was the Associate Executive Director of Project Reach Youth, a multi-service youth and family agency in Brooklyn, New York, where she was instrumental in developing model programs in youth development, family literacy and after school education. Earlier, she had served as Executive Director of Interfaith Neighbors, a pioneering youth program founded and supported by more than 20 churches and synagogues on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, and as a Program Coordinator at United Neighborhood Houses, an umbrella for the 36 settlement houses and community centers in New York City. Cora lives in Pleasantville with her family.

Bernard J. Kleina, Civil Rights Activist and Photographer, served as the Executive Director of HOPE Fair Housing Center in Wheaton, IL for more than 41 years and is one of the most respected fair housing advocates in the country. He has been described as "a champion of fair housing and other social concerns." One of the founding members of the National Fair Housing Alliance (NFHA), Bernard Kleina currently serves on its Board of Directors. He is past President of the Chicago Area Fair Housing Alliance. Additionally, he serves on the boards of the DuPage Legal Assistance Foundation, and Housing Choice Partners of Illinois, and has served on the faculty of the Office of Legal Education for the U.S. Department of Justice. Mr. Kleina has produced audio-visual presentations on poverty and on fair and affordable housing issues. His photography and multi-image presentations have been exhibited in both the United States, including such venues as The Smithsonian Institution, and Europe. For more information, see his website: www.bernardkleina.com.

Dr. Kenneth R. Hamilton completed his undergraduate degree at Seton Hall University and studied advanced level courses in fulfillment of his Master of Arts degree at Seton Hall University and Jersey City State University. He also completed leadership institutes at Harvard University and Princeton University, before completing doctoral studies at Nova Southeastern University. He worked as a Special Education teacher in Newark, NJ for 10 years. After leaving Newark Public Schools, Dr. Hamilton become Vice Principal at Hubbard Middle School in Plainfield, NJ. After being recognized for his ability to initiate change and spearhead improved student outcomes, he was promoted to Principal of Clinton Elementary School where he implemented one of the first mandatory school uniforms policies in the State of NJ. He was later hired as the Assistant Superintendent of Schools in Cherry Hill New Jersey. He then became Superintendent of Schools in Westampton Public Schools. During his tenure in Monroe Township, Dr Hamilton co -authored Senate Bill S2307 and presented before the NJ State Senate to justify the need for support of this proposal for equitable state funding for the children of Monroe. In July of 2014, Dr. Hamilton was appointed as the Superintendent of the Mt Vernon City School district where his leadership is already creating new synergy focused on community engagement and a quest for excellence.

Dennis D. Parker is Director of the ACLU’s Racial Justice Program which advocates for racial justice using litigation, public education, community organizing and legislation. Prior jobs include Chief of the New York State Attorney General’s Civil Rights Bureau, and staff attorney at the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. He publishes and lectures extensively about civil rights and is an adjunct professor at New York Law School. He graduated from Middlebury College and Harvard Law School.


Sponsored by: Westchester Residential Opportunities, John Jay Legal Services, and Citi Bank.

For more information, please contact Westchester Residential Opportunities at 914-428-4507.

Image: "Injustice Still Happens" Muralist, John Pittman Weber, ©Photographs by Bernard Kleina

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Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University, Moot Court Room

78 North Broadway

White Plains, NY 10603

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