Free

Multiple Dates

The Woman-Womb: Removal of the Mule Image of Black Women and Health

Actions and Detail Panel

Free

Event Information

Share this event

Date and Time

Location

Location

Online Event

Event description
This three-part discussion will consider the role of black women in the development of medical-social change.

About this Event

According to the American Heart Association, "Being an African American 'superwoman' might come with a price". The affects are from heart disease to mental health. Black women are more disporotionaly affected to improper medical treatment due to racisom. Yet, it is black women that always stand up and save the world (i.e., 2020 presidential election).

The very women that displayed how the American construct works, are the same women that suffer due to their historical relationship in the American construct.

The sexual and reproductive health of African American women has been compromised due to multiple experiences of racism, including discriminatory healthcare practices from slavery through the post-Civil Rights era. However, studies rarely consider how the historical underpinnings of racism negatively influence the present-day health outcomes of African American women [https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6167003/]. For example, in 1961, Fannie Lou Townsend Hamer (1917-1977) received a hysterectomy by a white doctor without her consent while undergoing surgery to remove a uterine tumor. Such forced sterilization of Black women, as a way to reduce the Black population, was so widespread it was dubbed a “Mississippi appendectomy.”

Now in its second year, COVID-19 has ravished black women. "Black people have a long history of poor medical treatment – no wonder many are hesitant to take COVID vaccines https://theconversation.com/black-people-have-a-long-history-of-poor-medical-treatment-no-wonder-many-are-hesitant-to-take-covid-vaccines-150214]".

Join us, as we draw from medial and academic professionals to discuss the body of the black female continued "mule" role.

  • Black Women, Research and Mental Health, March 6, 2021
  • Black Women and the COVID Vaccine, March 13, 2021
  • Black Women and Dental Care, March 20. 2021


		The Woman-Womb:  Removal of the Mule Image  of  Black Women and Health image

MARCH 6, 2021, Black Women, Research and Mental Health

Dr. Michelle Y. Williams, PhD, RN, Executive Director | Research & Clinical Trials Operations at Stanford Health Care


		The Woman-Womb:  Removal of the Mule Image  of  Black Women and Health image

		The Woman-Womb:  Removal of the Mule Image  of  Black Women and Health image

MARCH 6, 2021, Black Women, Research and Mental Health

Dr. Monique Swift

Clinical Psychologist, Licensed Professional Counselor


		The Woman-Womb:  Removal of the Mule Image  of  Black Women and Health image

		The Woman-Womb:  Removal of the Mule Image  of  Black Women and Health image

MARCH 13, 2021, Black Women and the COVID Vaccine

Dr. Christine W. Thorpe

Health Educator | Wellness Coach | Co-Founder of Stronger Tomorrow | University Administrator | Board Member of YWCA NNJ |Board Member of WOCPSCN


		The Woman-Womb:  Removal of the Mule Image  of  Black Women and Health image

		The Woman-Womb:  Removal of the Mule Image  of  Black Women and Health image

MARCH 13, 2021, Black Women and the COVID Vaccine

Gabrielle (Milnor) PullenHead Coach & Instructor at Your Life Matters - Trauma Relief Programs.


		The Woman-Womb:  Removal of the Mule Image  of  Black Women and Health image

		The Woman-Womb:  Removal of the Mule Image  of  Black Women and Health image

March 20, 2021, Black Women and Dental Care

Marie Jackson, DMD, FAGD

Dentist & Owner of Stellar Smile Center


		The Woman-Womb:  Removal of the Mule Image  of  Black Women and Health image

		The Woman-Womb:  Removal of the Mule Image  of  Black Women and Health image

March 20, 2021, Black Women and Dental Care

Davia Strachan-Rosemond

Pediatric Dentist South Orange Dental Center, PA

Share with friends

Location

Online Event

Save This Event

Event Saved