The Prize Papers Lunch Talks

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The Prize Papers Lunch Talks

Online Lecture Series of the Prize Papers Project (Oldenburg/London)

When and where

Date and time

Location

Online

About this event

The Prize Papers Project is dedicated to the study of the Prize Papers Collection, a vast and unique trove of records and objects confiscated by British privateers and naval vessels between 1652 and 1817, a period of time in which the seizure of ships was still a legitimate form of tactical warfare. The records are now held by The National Archives of the United Kingdom.

The aim of the German–UK Prize Papers Project (www.prizepapers.de) is the complete digitization and sorting of the Prize Papers, including preservation of the collection’s material, initial and in-depth cataloguing, creation of research-oriented metadata and finally presentation of digital copies and metadata in an open access research database. We also pursue various research projects and cooperate with numerous international researchers and research institutions working on the Prize Papers and in other project-related areas.

The Prize Papers offer researchers a unique collection of sources. Since its discovery, the collection has already inspired numerous groundbreaking projects in various fields of study and many countries around the world.

In this online lecture series of the Prize Papers LUNCH TALKS, we will hear nine short lectures from some of the leading experts on and pioneers of working with the collection and discuss their most recent work with them.

The Lunch Talks bring together renowned scholars, international early career researchers, master’s students and the interested public to discuss with us in a relaxed lunchtime setting.

The Prize Papers LUNCH TALKS will take place between November 14, 2022, and February 6, 2023, every other Monday, at 1–2 pm (CET). The Lunch Talks by Thomas Truxes and Catherine DeCesare will take place at 3–4 pm (CET) due to the time difference.

The event is open to the public, with advance registration requested.

Links to the meeting rooms via the user-friendly platform Webex will be provided after registration. Please contact lucas.haasis@uni-oldenburg.de if you have any questions.

The Prize Papers Lunch Talks are organized by Lucas Haasis, Dagmar Freist and Amanda Bevan.

Programme

14 November, 1-2 pm: Roelof van Gelder (author and independent scholar, Amsterdam)

The Merchant of Canton. Jan Bekker Teerlink (1759-1832)

21 November, 1-2 pm: Amanda Bevan (The National Archives, UK)

Capture Histories of the 1740s: a retrospective view on cataloguing the Prize Papers of the War of Austrian Succession

28 November, 1-2 pm: Ramona Negrón (Universiteit Leiden) & Jessica den Oudsten (Radboud University/Huygens ING)

The Amsterdam Private Slave Trade, 1730-1779

06 December, 3-4 pm: Thomas Truxes (Glucksman Ireland House, New York University)

The Amity Papers: Survivor Accounts of the 1690 Siege of Limerick

12 December, 1-2 pm: Éva Guillorel (Université Rennes 2)

'Charmante Margerite je te fait mais adieux'. The circulation of French songs on ships in the 17th and 18th centuries

19 December, 1-2 pm: Myriam Bergeron-Maguire (Université Sorbonne Nouvelle)

Missing hAlf the picture: ClassIcal NoT sO claSsical FrencH: project presentation, methods and challenges

16 January, 3-4 pm: Catherine DeCesare (The University of Rhode Island)

I fear some time will be lost before our Trial will come on.” The American Ship John Jay and the Bermuda Vice Admiralty Court, 1806.

23 January, 1-2 pm: Martijn van den Bel (Inrap Guyane, Cayenne)

«Tempora mutantur et Nos mutamur in illis» 1664: Turning the page in the French Antilles

6 February, 1-2 pm: Wim de Winter (KU Leuven)

Anson’s Transpacific Captures: a Privateer’s Peek Into Unseen or Illicit Interactions Across the Pacific (1741-1744)

The Prize Papers Project is part of the Göttingen Academy of Sciences and Humanities, Germany. It is based at the Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg, Germany, and The National Archives, UK. The project co-operates closely with the German Historical Institute London (GHIL), as well as the VZG (the headquarters of the Common Library Network) in Göttingen, who provide their IT expertise.

As of 2018, the project has been part of the Academies Programme of the Union of the German Academies of Sciences and Humanities. Thus, it is funded by the German state and the federal state of Lower Saxony, with a prospective funding period from 2018 to 2037.