$45

The Patchwork/Njahas of Quilting our Stories with artist Ife Felix

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LNAC

2785 Frederick Douglass Boulevard

New York, NY 10039

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In this workshop you will explore the tradition and culture of African and African American quilting experiences particular to patchwork and strip piecing.

PREREQUISITE: Intermediate

  • Participants MUST bring and have basic knowledge their own sewing machine
  • We will provide fabric and threads

For additional information please email: info@harlemneedlearts.org or phone: 212-491-8581.

From Ife Felix

The history of quilt making in America is as old as America, brought from Europe and Africa by the many people who arrived by choice and those in chains. Quilt making was for purpose and made to provide bedding and hangings in doors and windows to block out cold. Unable to afford to discard worn out materials they were recycled into blankets patched and repatched and then used as stuffing in blankets until it could not be patched any more.

This now art form was strictly function for warmth in the early days of quilting. Skilled Black slave women who worked on the plantations and for wealthy households added sewing and quilting to the many required duties. These women also made quilts for their families using the scraps and heavily used materials like gunny, feed, flour, and tobacco and sugar sacks out of necessary. The inside would be stuffed with old quilted blankets, worn unmendable clothes and bits of wool or raw cotton. Skilled quilters were able to supplement their income by making quilts to sell.

Many countries in Africa have a tradition and culture of patchwork. Used in ceremony, and fashion it is international in references and contemporary in style. I am most excited by the Senegalese patchwork tradition called 'njahas' pronounced (jah aas) a Wolof word for mixed up or confusion. In Senegal patchwork has a unique place in its culture. It began as a visual symbol of religious affiliation as well and a rejection of wealth and status by the Baye Fall people disciples of Ibra Fall. Fall followers dedicate themselves to hard work, poverty and prayer.

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LNAC

2785 Frederick Douglass Boulevard

New York, NY 10039

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Refund Policy

No Refunds

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