$0 – $10

The Oldest American-Made Piano Finds a Voice

Actions and Detail Panel

$0 – $10

Event Information

Share this event

Date and time

Location

Location

Online event

Refund policy

Refund policy

Contact the organizer to request a refund.

Eventbrite's fee is nonrefundable.

Event description
Join the Moravian Historical Society as we share the results of a remarkable project!

About this event

The Moravian Historical Society is excited to share the results of a remarkable project—to build a working, playable replica of the 18th century upright piano in our collection. The original instrument is believed to be the oldest extant American-made piano, a powerful example of the importance of music to the Moravian settlers in colonial America.

For two weeks in November 2019, John Watson, Tom Winter, and Michele Winter conducted an on-site examination of the original piano with the intention of both uncovering the instrument’s history and creating a playable replica for the Moravian Historical Society. After nearly a full year of work, the replica is complete and is now on display in our museum.

Through the process of examination and documentation we heard the original tell its story. Through the replica we hear its song. Join the Moravian Historical Society along with the research team on Zoom as we share the research process and what was discovered. You’ll also have the opportunity to hear the reproduction.

Thomas Winter builds, conserves, and restores early keyboard instruments at his workshop in San Francisco. He began building and restoring historical instruments in 1972. His projects include working in the Conservation and Collections Department at Colonial Williamsburg, work on a clavichord attributed to Philip Jacob Specken, circa 1740, and work on a grand piano by Erard, 1854.

John Watson is an independent conservator and maker of early keyboard instruments. He retired in 2016 from The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation (CWF) where he served as conservator and curator of musical instruments since 1988. His research on issues in musical instrument conservation resulted in two books. His 2018 reconstruction of George Washington’s 1793 Mount Vernon harpsichord, now exhibited at Mount Vernon, was his 33rd reproduction keyboard instrument.

John Watson, Thomas Winter, and Michele Winter, publish and administer Clinkscale Online, an online research database containing nearly 8000 pianos built before 1860.

Share with friends

Date and time

Location

Online event

Refund policy

Contact the organizer to request a refund.

Eventbrite's fee is nonrefundable.

Save This Event

Event Saved