Free

The Drug of Art: Ivan Blatný at 100

Event Information

Share this event

Date and Time

Location

Location

Czech Center New York

321 East 73rd Street

New York, NY 10021

View Map

Event description
Ivan Blatný is known as one of the most prominent Czech poets of the 20th century.

About this Event

Ivan Blatný is known as one of the most prominent Czech poets of the 20th century. This poetry evening will pay homage to his work through bringing together poets, translators and scholars along with the publishers of the first bilingual edition of Blatný’s work, The Drug of Art.

January 22, 7PM in the Cinema

The evening, moderated by Alex Zucker, will begin with an introduction about The Drug of Art, published by Ugly Duckling Presse, by the book’s editor, Veronika Tuckerová, which will be followed by:

Readings of Blatný’s poems by poet and translator Anna Moschkovakis, publisher from Ugly Duckling Presse Matvei Yankelevich and poet and translator Monica de la Torre, accompanied by a projection of selections from Blatný’s work.

A talk by Slavicist Jose Vergara, author of an extensive study about Blatný.

A moderated discussion with all of the evening’s participants.

Ivan Blatný (b. 1919 – d. 1990)

Ivan Blatný was a Czech poet, member of the artistic Group 42 and son of the writer Lev Blatný. His literary patron was the famous Czech poet Vítězslav Nezval. At school, Blatný was an editor of the Student Magazine, where he won an award for Poem of the Year. The then studied Czech and German language at Masaryk University’s Faculty of Philosophy in Brno. He also became fluent in Esperanto. In 1940, he published his first collection of poems titled Paní Jitřenka (Mrs. Morning Star), which was followed a year later by the collection Melancholické procházky (Melancholic Walks), which won him a national award. Originally a member of the Czechoslovak Communist Party, he was sent to London as a delegate of the Syndicate of Czechoslovak writers. While there, he applied for political asylum and never returned home. As a result of this, he was labeled as a traitor by the communist government and his work was banned in Czechoslovakia. He continued publishing in exile, however his health gradually declined and he eventually died of pulmonary emphysema in 1991. His ashes were transported to his native Brno, where a plaque commemorating him and his work was revealed in 1994.

Share with friends

Date and Time

Location

Czech Center New York

321 East 73rd Street

New York, NY 10021

View Map

Save This Event

Event Saved