£0 – £75

The Changing Face of Justice - Magistrates Association Annual Conference, A...

Event Information

Share this event

Date and Time

Location

Location

Crowne Plaza Stratford Upon Avon

Bridge Foot

Stratford-upon-Avon

CV37 6YR

United Kingdom

View Map

Refund Policy

Refund Policy

Refunds up to 30 days before event

Event description

Description

The theme of this year's conference is THE CHANGING FACE OF JUSTICE, so please join us for an interactive look at the future of the magistracy against the backdrop of the wider justice system.

You will have the opportunity to network with magistrates from around the country, hear from key figures in law, government, and the criminal justice system, participate in thought-provoking breakout sessions, and meet MA officers and staff. We will be exploring trends, developments and changes in legislation across an array of topical issues, including mental health, stalking, innovations in information technology, intersectional approaches to justice, and MUCH MORE!

More information about sessions and additional confirmed speakers will be provided over the coming months.



KEYNOTES

Sir Andrew McFarlane, President of the Family Division

Sir Andrew McFarlane became the President of the Family Division on 28 July 2018. He was called to the Bar in 1977 and took Silk (Queen’s Counsel) in 1998. He was appointed a Recorder in 1995, a Deputy High Court Judge in 2000 and a High Court Judge in the Family Division in 2005.

He co-wrote Children Law and Practice which coincided with the enactment of the Children Act 1989 in 1991, and he has been noted for his speeches and lectures around the country on all aspects of child law.

His expertise resulted in his selection as the only legal member of the Family Justice Review (Norgrove) and as the judicial representative for the current sector-led review financed by the Nuffield. The review is due to report this summer.

Sir Andrew has held or holds leadership posts including Chairman of the Family Law Bar Association, Chairman of the Clergy Discipline Commission and President of the Clergy Disciplines Tribunals. He was Family Division Liaison Judge for the Midland circuit until his appointment as a Lord Justice of Appeal in 2011 where he is the Supervising Lord Justice for Family Cases.

He will be sharing his views on the current challenges facing the family justice system and what future reforms may be required.



PANELS

Panel 1: The changing face of the magistracy

An exploration of the issues around recruiting full and part time employees to the magistracy, as well as representation of marginalised communities within the magistracy. Of particular interest will be young magistrates, the LGBTQIA community and those with disabilities. The session will also consider how these challenges vary by location - for example rural and urban communities - and how recruitment can ensure a representative magistracy across adult, family and youth court jurisdictions.

Confirmed speaker

1. Susan Acland-Hood: Chief Executive and Board member, HM Courts & Tribunals Service

Susan was previously the Director of Enterprise and Growth at HM Treasury where she was responsible for policies on productivity, growth, business, infrastructure, exports, competition and markets, and for energy and transport spending. Prior to that, she spent two years as Director of Education Funding at the Department for Education, overseeing the comprehensive reform of the capital programme. Susan has also worked extensively on home affairs and justice policy, both at Number 10 and in the Home Office. She has also had senior roles in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets, and in the Social Exclusion Unit.

As Chief Executive of HMCTS, she is responsible is responsible for overall leadership, the delivery of services, and strategy and vision for the organisation.

Panel 2: Interactions between inequality and justice

An exploration of how a range of factors such as race, class, and gender may shape or determine differences in the way individuals interact with both criminal and family courts.

The panel will look at how inequality impacts on offending, victimisation, case processing, and outcomes, as well as how family issues are dealt with; how to address disparities in various phases of the judicial process (e.g. arrest, sentencing, and family hearings) and pathways into offending and victimisation; and discuss ways to engage more critically in how the justice system embodies, perpetuates, and transforms existing social inequalities such as race, class, and gender.

Confirmed speaker

1. Dr Alpa Parmar

Dr Alpa Parmar read Social and Political Sciences as an undergraduate at Cambridge and also completed her doctorate at the Institute of Criminology, Cambridge, in which she empirically examined perceptions of Asian criminality in the UK. Her PhD was part of the Peterborough Adolescent Development Study which is an ongoing longitudinal project in the UK. Alpa also holds a Postgraduate Diploma in Law, which she achieved in 2002.

Following completion of her PhD, Alpa held a British Academy Postdoctoral fellowship at the School of Law at King's College London during which she researched police stop and search practices under the Terrorism Act 2000 and the consequences of counter-terrorist polices for minority ethnic groups - particularly British Asian people. Alpa's research focuses on the intersections between race, gender and criminalization and her current research projects explore the policing of migration in the UK, minority ethnic life stories of offending and understanding the relationship between race and sentencing. Alpa is also interested in the intersection of securitization and race its consequences for people crossing borders across the world.

Alpa was appointed as a non-judicial member of the Sentencing Council in April 2018. The Sentencing Council is an independent, non-departmental public body of the Ministry of Justice which has responsibility for developing sentencing guidelines.




BREAKOUTS

Breakout 1. Stalking: led by the Suzy Lamplugh Trust

The Suzy Lamplugh Trust was founded by Diana and Paul Lamplugh following the disappearance of their daughter Suzy, a young estate agent, in 1986. Since then, the Trust has pioneered personal safety as a life skill and a public policy priority.

The mission of the Trust is to raise awareness of personal safety through training and various projects, to help people avoid becoming victims of aggression, and to offer counselling and support to relatives and friends of missing people. The Trust runs the UK's National Stalking Helpline and organises National Personal Safety Day.

Breakout 2. Mental Health: led by the Sentencing Council

The Sentencing Council for England and Wales was set up to promote greater transparency and consistency in sentencing, whilst maintaining the independence of the judiciary. It is an independent, non-departmental public body of the Ministry of Justice and replaced the Sentencing Guidelines Council and the Sentencing Advisory Panel in April 2010.

The primary role of the Council is to issue guidelines on sentencing which the courts must follow unless it is in the interests of justice not to do so.

Breakout 3. What is the role of the courts in responding to societal problems?

This session will look at the trend towards the criminalisation of activities that would previously not have been regarded as crimes, including issues around hate crime online and freedom of speech, coercive and controlling behaviour, substance abuse and so on.

Confirmed speakers

1. Mary Ryan, Family Drug and Alcohol Courts

2. Phil Bowen, Director: Centre for Justice Innovation

Phil sets and leads the work and overall strategy of the Centre for Justice Innovation. Prior to this role, Phil spent the majority of his career in the British civil service. He worked for the Home Office and Ministry of Justice, before working at HM Treasury and Cabinet Office as a delivery adviser to the Prime Minister on criminal justice reform. During his time in the civil service, he spent 14 months on secondment to the Center for Court Innovation in New York, working at Bronx Community Solutions.

He will be speaking about problem solving courts in criminal justice, with a particular focus on the role of judges in monitoring community sentences, and how that can benefit the effectiveness of community sentences in addressing underlying causes of offending.

Breakout 4. Innovations and technology in justice

This session will look at the future of technology in the UK, exploring its potential impact on magistrates and the justice system as a whole.

Confirmed speakers

1. Dr Paul Dawson, Head of Research at Mayor's Office for Policing and Crime (MOPAC)

Share with friends

Date and Time

Location

Crowne Plaza Stratford Upon Avon

Bridge Foot

Stratford-upon-Avon

CV37 6YR

United Kingdom

View Map

Refund Policy

Refunds up to 30 days before event

Save This Event

Event Saved