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The Art of Period Dress Part 2- November 17

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Prallsville Mills

33 Risler Street

Stockton, NJ 08559

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Crossroads is excited to once again partner with the Hunterdon County Cultural and Heritage Commission to bring you our 2017 Fall Heritage Partner Professional Development Conference, "The Art of Period Dress Part 2," on Friday, November 17 and Saturday, November 18 at 10am at the Prallsville Mills in Stockton, NJ!

The second in this popular series, this conference will feature two completely different and distinct days of programming featuring presenters that are masters in their craft. Our morning presentations will feature: Rebecca Fifield on women’s dress of the lower sorts, and Andrew Kirk on hat types and styles.

The afternoon hands-on workshops include several to help participants sew items of period clothing, and will be hosted by Eliza West, Andrew Kirk, Carrie Fellows, Kirsten Hammerstrom, David Niescior and Asher Lurie with assistance from Kim Boice and Lauren Skorka. The topics covered in the afternoon workshops include bonnets, fabric 101, hair and caps, hats, market wallets, aprons, and getting comfortable with getting dressed 18th century style for men and women.

Here is the schedule for Friday, November 17, 2017

Keynote Speaker for Morning Presentation-

Rebecca Fifield, Head of Collection Management for the Special Collections at The New York Public Library

Presentation- "Runaway! Recapturing Information about Working Women's Dress through Runaway Advertisement Analysis, 1750-90"- Focus will be on women’s dress of the lower sorts

Indentured and enslaved women in the American colonies provided domestic, agricultural, and commercial labor, but left behind little documentary evidence of their lives. For those women who dared to abscond from service, information about their physical appearance was listed in newspaper runaway advertisements to help identify, capture, and return the eloped woman. For living history practitioners, historic site educators, and costume historians, runaway advertisements provide one of the strongest sources of information about working women’s clothing, in the absence of paintings and first hand accounts. This project focuses on understanding what clothing details in runaway advertisements was typical, and what was not. The speaker has assembled a database of approximately 1000 female runaway advertisements, including references for 6000 garments, using this data to analyze frequency of different types of garments, textiles, color, and jewelry reported in the runaway advertisements. The discussion will include explanation about types of unfree labor, the use of printed textiles, the supply of garments to working women by masters, and other topics.

Afternoon Workshops and Presenters- (*When registering pick two. Some workshops include an additional fee to cover materials.)

Workshop- Put a Lid on It: 18th Century Bonnets- presented by Kirsten Hammerstrom, Curator and Material Culture Specialist

Put a Lid on It: 18th Century Bonnets- After an overview of mid-to-late 18th century bonnet styles and shapes, participants will work on their own bonnet. A selection of several pre-cut brim shapes will be available, along with pre-cut pieces in the traditional black silk taffeta. After getting started, participants will have instructions for finishing the bonnet at home.

Workshop- Understanding Fabric- presented by Eliza West, Lois F. McNeil Fellow in the Winterthur Program in American Material Culture

Understanding Fabric- This workshop will teach participants about the basics needed to understand and evaluate textiles for use in period clothing. We will learn how to identify different types of fiber, as well as different weaves of cloth, and explore colors and patterns with an eye for those which are suitable for period clothing. We will handle and discuss a wide variety of fabrics, and participants will gain an understanding of their various benefits or shortcomings.

Workshop- Hair Hacks & Flattering Caps for Living History Impressions 1775-1782- presented by Carrie Fellows, Executive Director, Hunterdon County Cultural and Heritage Commission

Hair Hacks & Flattering Caps for Living History Impressions 1775-1782- A cap may flatter (or make frightful) the person who wears it - and subtle tricks underneath one’s cap may be employed to hide modern hairstyles and make them appear more like those of the 1770s. Learn to transform your contemporary hairstyle into one that mimics those of the period and looks right with a cap. Participants should bring their own caps and hair accessories (hairpins, bobby pins, barrettes, clips, combs, elastics, Alice bands, scrunchies, hairpieces, etc.), styling gel/spray, a brush and comb, and a dressing mirror that can be propped up on a table. Those with very short hair are encouraged to also bring a selection of scarves for headwraps. A variety of caps will be available for a try-on session to help participants find the most flattering and historically accurate style for their impression.

Workshop- Getting Comfortable with Getting Dressed for Men- presented by David Niescior, Senior Historical Interpreter and Asher Lurie, Senior Historical Interpreter

Walk through the process of getting dressed in eighteenth-century men's clothes with David Niescior and Asher Lurie. In this workshop participants will get tips and tricks on how to wear period clothing comfortably and accurately. David and Asher will explore getting in and out of a few variations on "standard" eighteenth-century military uniforms and middle and lower class men's clothing. There will be ample opportunity to ask questions and explore the ins and outs of different garments.

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Prallsville Mills

33 Risler Street

Stockton, NJ 08559

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