Teach the Black Freedom Struggle Online Classes

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Teach the Black Freedom Struggle Online Classes

People's Historians Online Classes offer the chance to learn directly from leading historians and to meet peers from across the country.

When and where

Date and time

Location

Online

Refund Policy

No Refunds

About this event

  • 144 days
  • Mobile eTicket

The Zinn Education Project hosts the Teach the Black Freedom Struggle online classes at least once a month (generally on Mondays) at 4:00 pm PT / 7:00 pm ET for 90 minutes. In each session, a teacher interviews the historian and breakout rooms allow participants in small groups to meet each other, discuss the content, and share teaching ideas. We designed the sessions for teachers and other school staff, however, we welcome parents, students, and others.

Watch recordings of past classes here.

ASL interpretation provided.

Professional development credit certificate provided upon request for attendees.

Below are upcoming sessions and more are in the works.

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Monday, February 6, 2023: Jeanne Theoharis on Starring Mrs. Rosa Parks: Film Excerpts and Behind the Scenes Commentary

Jeanne Theoharis, in conversation with Jesse Hagopian, about Rosa Parks’ activism prior to the Montgomery Bus Boycott, her trip to the Highlander Folk School, and the decades she dedicated to challenging racism in the North. This session will include clips from the new documentary The Rebellious Life of Mrs. Rosa Parks, based on the book of the same name by Theoharis.

Jeanne Theoharis is a distinguished professor at Brooklyn College. She is the author or co-author of nine books and numerous articles on the Civil Rights and Black Power movements and the politics of race and education. Her books include the award-winning titles The Rebellious Life of Mrs. Rosa Parks and A More Beautiful and Terrible History: The Uses and Misuses of Civil Rights History.

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Monday, March 20, 2023: Kidada Williams on I Saw Death Coming: A History of Terror and Survival in the War against Reconstruction

The story of Reconstruction is often told from the perspective of the politicians, generals, and journalists whose accounts claim an outsized place in collective memory. But this pivotal era looked very different to African Americans in the South transitioning from bondage to freedom after 1865. They were besieged by a campaign of white supremacist violence that persisted through the 1880s and beyond. For too long, their lived experiences have been sidelined, impoverishing our understanding of the obstacles post-Civil War Black families faced, their inspiring determination to survive, and the physical and emotional scars they bore because of it.

In her new book, I Saw Death Coming, Kidada E. Williams offers a breakthrough account of the much-debated Reconstruction period, transporting readers into the daily existence of formerly enslaved people building hope-filled new lives. Drawing on overlooked sources and bold new readings of the archives, Williams offers a revelatory and, in some cases, minute-by-minute record of nighttime raids and Ku Klux Klan strikes. And she deploys cutting-edge scholarship on trauma to consider how the effects of these attacks would linger for decades-indeed, generations-to come.

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April 24, 2023: Linda Villarosa on Under the Skin: The Hidden Toll of Racism on American Lives and on the Health of Our Nation

In her new book, Under the Skin: The Hidden Toll of Racism on American Lives and on the Health of Our Nation, where she exposes the persistent racism in the U.S. healthcare system. As described by author Claudia Rankin, this book “walks us through the inevitable consequences of living in a racist country on our bodies, our environments, and our healthcare system.” Villarosa will be in conversation with Rethinking Schools editor and high school teacher Jesse Hagopian.

“Villarosa’s empathic and sharp-sighted journalism is as astute as it is groundbreaking, as brilliant as it is timely. Let the conversations begin!” –Jacqueline Woodson, New York Times bestselling author of Red at the Bone

“It’s no secret that Black people are subject to the cumulative effects of systemic racism. But Linda Villarosa’s Under the Skin walks us through the inevitable consequences of living in a racist country on our bodies, our environments, and our healthcare system. The cultural manifestations of the physical and psychological traumas affecting Black People alter or distort all our lives. Those of us who understand that structural violence has physical ramifications will be in debt to Under the Skin. I am grateful for the arrival of this book. It is a relief to have the truth of racialized trauma exposed in such cogent, undeniable writing and with such genius analysis. This is journalism at its finest. If you read one book this year, let it be this one.” –Claudia Rankine, author of Citizen: An American Lyric

“In Under the Skin, Linda Villarosa has written a book that will transform how you understand the relationship between race and medicine, one that makes clear the connection between our history and our health. This is a book filled with indispensable research, but also filled with humanity. Villarosa tells us important stories, and also becomes part of the story herself. I’m so glad this book exists, I will be thinking about it for a long time." –Clint Smith, New York Times bestselling author of How the Word Is Passed

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Monday, May 8, 2023: Howard French on Born in Blackness: Africa, Africans, and the Making of the Modern World, 1471 to the Second World War

Howard W. French is a career foreign correspondent and global affairs writer and the author of five books. He worked as a French-English translator in Abidjan, Ivory Coast in the early 1980s, and taught English literature for several years at the University of Abidjan. He joined The New York Times in 1986, and worked as a metropolitan reporter with the newspaper for three years, and then from 1990 to 2008 reported overseas for The Times as bureau chief for Central America and the Caribbean, West and Central Africa, Japan and the Koreas, and China, based in Shanghai. His most recent non-fiction book, titled Born in Blackness: Africa, Africans and the Making of the Modern World, 1471 to the Second World War, was published in October 2021.

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Monday, June 12, 2023: Dr. Kimberlé Crenshaw on Teaching Truthfully About U.S. History

Kimberlé Crenshaw is the co-founder and executive director of the African American Policy Forum, and the founder and executive director of the Center for Intersectionality and Social Policy Studies at Columbia Law School. She is the Promise Institute Professor at UCLA Law School and the Isidor and Seville Sulzbacher Professor at Columbia Law School.

She is popularly known for her development of “intersectionality,” “Critical Race Theory,” and the #SayHerName Campaign, and is the host of the podcast Intersectionality Matters!. She also is a columnist for The New Republic, and the moderator of the widely impactful webinar series Under The Blacklight: The Intersectional Vulnerabilities that the Twin Pandemics Lay Bare. She is one of the most cited scholars in legal history and has been recognized as Ms. magazine’s “No. 1 Most Inspiring Feminist;” one of Prospect Magazine’s ten most important thinkers in the world; and listed in Ebony’s “Power 100″ issue. Crenshaw will be in conversation with Rethinking Schools editor and high school teacher Jesse Hagopian. Check out Crenshaw’s ACLU podcast episode on this topic.