Sold Out

Taste of Science:Scientific Flash-Presentations Paired with a Glass of Wine

Event Information

Share this event

Date and Time

Location

Location

Consulate General of Hungary

223 East 52nd Street

Bartók Hall

New York, NY 10022

View Map

Event description

Description

A Taste of Science: Scientific Flash-Presentations Paired With a Glass of Wine.

What a stimulation and joy can a challenging but interesting conversation over a glass of excellent wine create, right?

At our Taste of Science event, we pair these two and power them up!

Six leading scientists will give short (3 minute) flash-talks on their cutting-edge scientific projects.... The purpose of a talk is to be understood, so they'll tailor their presentations to a general audience...

Ash Rajan, an established financial market strategist and investment advisor and Master of Bordeaux Wine from the Ecole Du Bordeaux, France paired a wine to each presentation and will introduce them (2 minutes) after every talk...The purpose of a wine is to be tasted, so the audience will have glasses...

The talks and wine tasting will be followed by an evening of networking and conversation.

Program:

06:30-07:00 pm - Arrival, registration

07:00-07:10 pm - Welcome (Consulate General of NY, GAIN, NYHSS, Alianta)

07:10-08:00 pm - Flash-talks and wine tasting

08:00-09:00 pm - Networking

The event is hosted by the Consulate General of New York and presented by the New York Hungarian Scientific Society, the German Academic International Network (GAIN) and Alianta (Romania)


The presenters:

Black holes and what we can learn from them without falling in by
Dr. Imre Bartos (Department of Physics, Columbia University):
I will discuss how we are observing the most voracious objects in the Universe, and how we recently caught two black colliding. I speculate that I will be paired with a dark red wine.

Peer Effects in Risk Taking: Evidence from Germany by
Dr. Annette Hofmann (Assistant Professor, St. John’s University The Peter J. Tobin College of Business School of Risk Management)
While it has been shown that individuals’ migration propensities, among other characteristics, significantly depend on their risk attitudes, empirical evidence on the behavioral consequences of interaction with peer groups on individual risk preferences (“peer effects”) is very limited so far. This study uses data from the German Socio-Economic Panel to analyze peer effects in risk taking by tracking the impact of the East-West migration on the willingness to take risks after the German reunification. We find strong empirical evidence for such peer effects. Interestingly, however, the hypothesis that these effects are stronger in more sociable communities is rejected.

Mechanism of Autoimmunity in Multiple Sclerosis
by Lilla Horvath, MD (Sanofi Genzyme)
Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease of the central nervous system (CNS). MS typically presents in early adulthood and it is more frequent in women. A hallmark of MS is aberrant immune responses resulting in the destruction of neuronal cell myelin sheathing, compromising conductivity. It also leads to axonal damage, loss of oligodendrocytes and astrocytic gliosis. Underlying this pathology are chronically activated immune cells, including T and B cells. What triggers this autoimmunity in MS is currently unknown.

Before the "Two Cultures"
by Dr. Fabian Krämer (Visiting Scholar, Center for Science and Society, Columbia University in the City of New York)
Few beliefs about the nature of academic knowledge appear to be less problematic and are more deeply ingrained than the assumption that a wide gulf divides the natural sciences and the humanities. The happy phrase “two cultures”, invented and devised by the British physical chemist and novelist C.P. Snow against the backdrop of the Cold War, has over the past decades assumed an a-historical ring. But like many other dichotomies that characterize modernity, this binary opposition is younger than we tend to think. While some of its roots go back to the early modern period, it was largely in the nineteenth century that academics began to develop a sense of belonging to either the sciences or the humanities. The emergence of the “great divide” constituted one of the most fundamental transformations in the history of knowledge. Its history remains to be written.

Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS): Barriers to Diagnosis and Treatment
by Elena Lascu, AM, CCRP (Center for Infection and Immunity, Columbia University)
A multitude of ME/CFS outbreaks have been recorded over the last 200 years across the globe, and this illness has been known by many names. This devastating illness, which affects upward of 2.5 million Americans and 17 million individuals worldwide, has been widely dismissed as psychological or attention-seeking in nature by the medical profession until recent years. To date, no diagnostic tools or treatments exist. Here, the history, clinical presentation and persisting challenges of ME/CFS will be described.

Fecal Microbiota Transplantation by
Dorottya Nagy-Szakal, MD (Center for Infection and Immunity, Columbia University)
The human gut microbiome is the group of living microorganism living in our digestive tract. The microbiome is increasingly recognized for its ability to influence human metabolism, physiology and immune function. Besides the local effect on homeostasis and potential colonic inflammation in dysbiosis (altered microbiome), the microbime plays a role modulating host behavior and mood. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a procedure in which fecal matter is collected from a tested donor, and placed in a patient with dysbiosis by colonoscopy or enema. FMT is a low-risk and highly effective treatment for Clostridium difficile infection, and has also had promising results with gastrointestinal disorders, autoimmune and neuropsychiatric diseases.

Date and Time

Location

Consulate General of Hungary

223 East 52nd Street

Bartók Hall

New York, NY 10022

View Map

Save This Event

Event Saved