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Taiwan's Role in the Indo-Asia-Pacific

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Global Taiwan Institute

1836 Jefferson Place Northwest

Washington, DC 20036

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Please join the Global Taiwan Institute at our first public seminar of 2018, where we will be looking at the Trump Administration's "Indo-Pacific" strategy and its implications for Taiwan. With the release of the Administration's new National Security Strategy, it is clear that the Indo-Asia-Pacific region is both a foreign and security policy priority for the United States. In particular, the American vision for a "free and open Indo-Pacific" highlighted by Secretary of State Rex Tillerson underscores the importance of working with regional democracies, such as Australia, India, and Japan. As the administration seeks to shift US focus to long-term competition with China and to partner with nations that share US values, Taiwan may have a unique opportunity to engage with both the United States and the region in new ways. To explore these and other relevant issues, we are pleased to be joined by four leading thinkers on the Indo-Asia-Pacific region, its security challenges, and its strategic climate.

Doors will open at 11:30. A light lunch will be served, and the event will begin at 12:00. Kindly RSVP by January 15. Please direct questions or concerns to abell@globaltaiwan.org.

**Media: Please contact Anna Scott Bell at abell@globaltaiwan.org if you would like to bring additional crew members or equipment, so that we can be sure to accommodate you.

PANELISTS

Zack Cooper is a Senior Fellow for Asian security at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS). Dr. Cooper has authored numerous studies at CSIS, includingCountering Coercion in Maritime Asia: The Theory and Practice of Gray Zone Deterrence and Asia-Pacific Rebalance 2025: Capabilities, Presence, and Partnerships. Prior to joining CSIS, Dr. Cooper worked as a research fellow at the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments. He previously served on the White House staff as assistant to the deputy national security adviser for combating terrorism. He also worked as a civil servant in the Pentagon, first as a foreign affairs specialist and then as a special assistant to the principal deputy under secretary of defense for policy. He received a B.A. from Stanford University and an M.P.A., M.A., and Ph.D. from Princeton University.

Patrick M. Cronin is a Senior Advisor and Senior Director of the Asia-Pacific Security Program at the Center for a New American Security (CNAS). Previously, he was the Senior Director of the Institute for National Strategic Studies (INSS) at the National Defense University, where he simultaneously oversaw the Center for the Study of Chinese Military Affairs. Dr. Cronin has a rich and diverse background in both Asian-Pacific security and U.S. defense, foreign and development policy. Prior to leading INSS, Dr. Cronin served as the Director of Studies at the London-based International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS). Before joining IISS, Dr. Cronin was Senior Vice President and Director of Research at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS). In 2001, Dr. Cronin was confirmed by the United States Senate to the third-ranking position at the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). While serving as Assistant Administrator for Policy and Program Coordination, Dr. Cronin also led the interagency task force that helped design the Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC). From 1998 until 2001, Dr. Cronin served as Director of Research at the U.S. Institute of Peace. Prior to that, he spent seven years at the National Defense University, first arriving at INSS in 1990 as a Senior Research Professor covering Asian and long-range security issues. He was the founding Executive Editor of Joint Force Quarterly, and subsequently became both Deputy Director and Director of Research at the Institute. He received the Army's Meritorious Civilian Service Award upon his departure from NDU in 1997.

Dr. Cronin has taught at Georgetown University’s Security Studies Program, The Johns Hopkins University’s Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), and the University of Virginia’s Woodrow Wilson Department of Government. He read International Relations at St Antony’s College, University of Oxford, where he received both his M.Phil. and D.Phil. degrees, and graduated with high honors from the University of Florida. He regularly publishes essays in leading publications and frequently conducts television and radio interviews.

Bonnie Glaser is a Senior Adviser for Asia and the director of the China Power Project at CSIS, where she works on issues related to Asia-Pacific security with a focus on Chinese foreign and security policy. She is concomitantly a nonresident fellow with the Lowy Institute in Sydney, Australia, and a senior associate with the CSIS Pacific Forum. Ms. Glaser has worked for more than three decades at the intersection of Asia-Pacific geopolitics and U.S. policy. From 2008 to mid-2015, she was a senior adviser with the CSIS Freeman Chair in China Studies, and from 2003 to 2008, she was a senior associate in the CSIS International Security Program. Prior to joining CSIS, she served as a consultant for various U.S. government offices, including the Departments of Defense and State. Ms. Glaser has published widely in academic and policy journals, including the Washington Quarterly, China Quarterly, Asian Survey,International Security,Contemporary Southeast Asia,American Foreign Policy Interests, Far Eastern Economic Review, and Korean Journal of Defense Analysis, as well as in leading newspapers such as the New York Times and International Herald Tribune and in various edited volumes on Asian security. She is also a regular contributor to the Pacific Forum web journal Comparative Connections. She is currently a board member of the U.S. Committee of the Council for Security Cooperation in the Asia Pacific and a member of both the Council on Foreign Relations and the International Institute for Strategic Studies. She served as a member of the Defense Department’s Defense Policy Board China Panel in 1997. Ms. Glaser received her B.A. in political science from Boston University and her M.A. with concentrations in international economics and Chinese studies from the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies.

Miles Maochun Yu is a Professor of East Asia and military and naval history at the United States Naval Academy (USNA). He is the author of numerous scholarly articles on military and intelligence history and newspaper columns; his books include OSS in China: Prelude to Cold War (Yale University Press, 1997) and The Dragon’s War: Allied Operations and the Fate of China, 1937–1947 (Naval Institute Press, 2006). He is the recipient of numerous awards including the USNA top researcher award, US Navy Special Action Award, and US Navy Meritorious Service Awards. He consults with other government agencies and Congress on China-related topics and has appeared on the PBS NewsHour as a China analyst, at various congressional hearings as an expert witness, and with the History and Discovery Channels as chief historian for military documentaries. He received a doctorate in history from the University of California, Berkeley, a master’s degree from Swarthmore College, and a bachelor’s degree from Nankai University.


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Global Taiwan Institute

1836 Jefferson Place Northwest

Washington, DC 20036

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