$18

Strung Out, The Bombpops, Counterpunch

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Performers

Strung Out, The Bombpops, Counterpunch

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Location

Lookout Lounge

320 South 72nd Street

Omaha, NE 68114

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Refund Policy

Refund Policy

Refunds up to 7 days before event

Event description

Description

Black Heart Booking and A-13 Punk Rock Present:

Strung Out with special guests:

The Bombpops

Counterpunch

Saturday, October 20th, 2018

Doors: 7 PM, Show: 8 PM

$18 ADV/$20 DOS

ALL AGES - Everyone must have a valid ID. Under 18 needs to be accompanied by a parent or guardian or have a notarized parental permission form: http://www.lookoutomaha.com/parental-consent-form

ALL SALES ARE FINAL. NO REFUNDS.

For show/venue info go to: www.lookoutomaha.com


Strung Out

http://www.strungout.com/

https://www.facebook.com/strungout/

https://strungout.bandcamp.com/

Six years. It’s longer than the president sits in office or most people spend in college. In the music industry, it’s practically an eternity. Bands form, blow up and break up in that time period; new, disturbingly awful trends develop, old forms of media die out, social networks spread their insidious seed through shiny handheld devices no one actually needs but everybody wants.
Six years is also the amount of time that has passed since Strung Out’s last album. The Southern California tech-punk quintet had been so reliable for two decades—write, record, tour, repeat cycle roughly once every two years—that to go this long without new music felt like cause for alarm. Frontman Jason Cruz shared similar feelings.
“You get to a point where you decide if you’re going to go on or stop,” he admits. “Everyone kind of just lived life for a little bit. I think that’s pretty important if you consider yourself a songwriter or an artist of any kind. You have to live and experience other things in your life to have something to write about, to give value to what you’re singing about.”
Cruz & Co. were able to put their time off to good use, focusing their energy on the creation of Transmission.Alpha.Delta, out March 24 on their longtime label Fat Wreck Chords. The album didn’t come together easily, though; according to Cruz, writing was a yearlong process, as was recording. “We have an excess of ideas, and everyone in the band likes to put their elbows up and fight for their ideas,” he explains. I think that conflict is healthy. It’s all part of collaborating.” The process was further knotted by adding in another strong voice in producer Kyle Black, whose previous production credits ranged from Paramore to Comeback Kid. “There was butting heads in the beginning,” Cruz admits. “We’ve been doing something for 25 years and then some kid steps up and tells you to try it a little differently, all of us were like, ‘What? Who is this guy?’”
Early tensions were resolved, though, when the band realized they had an ally behind the boards. “Kyle was the first producer we’ve worked with that was a true fan of the band,” the vocalist says. “A lot of people said Transmission.Alpha.Delta is reminiscent of some of the earlier stuff we did, and I think Kyle had a lot to do with that, celebrating what this band is but at the same time hopefully elevating our artform.”
And elevate it he did; Transmission.Alpha.Delta is an album well worth its half-decade wait, with incredible songs like “Magnolia,” “Modern Drugs” and “Tesla” lyrically tackling difficult issues like drug addiction, faith and even the technological brainwashing of today’s youth while musically measuring up with the best moments of the band’s back catalog. “The biggest theme of this record was that we were all outside our comfort zone,” Cruz says. “Instead of just soloing, we’ve incorporated the solos into the actual structure of the songs. We mixed up the tempos, and we switched to E flat, which gives the guitars a better tone. I think we created a journey from where each song begins to where the song ends are two completely different places. I love that about Strung Out songs.”
Cruz is is own harshest critic, so when the singer says this might be his favorite Strung Out album, he really means it. “I judge the record by how accurately it describes my life,” he says. “As long as it’s a representation of who I am, and sincere and not pandering to any ’90s bullshit—I fuckin’ hated the ’90s. I don’t want Strung Out to be a nostalgia punk band at all. I wanna be right here, right now. I consider it an honor to be a musician and to contribute to everything that came before me.”
That urge to keep pushing to be modern and relevant and not rest on their laurels is what continually sets Strung Out apart from so many of their nostalgia-obsessed peers. “I’m not interested in looking back at all,” Cruz states. “I have no time or energy for that. There’s too much shit to be done. When I’m sitting in a diaper and on a morphine drip, maybe I’ll look back. Maybe I’ll actually listen to one of our old records.”
It’s clear Strung Out are rejuvenated and ready for more. And even though Cruz might not listen to Transmission.Alpha.Delta again until a few decades from now, odds are their fans will listen to it more than enough in the interim.

The Bombpops

http://thebombpops.com/

https://www.facebook.com/TheBombpops/

https://thebombpops.bandcamp.com/

“We put a lot of thought into being able to tell stories with these songs,” says Jen Razavi who, along with Poli van Dam, founded The Bombpops in 2007. Together, Razavi and van Dam became the band’s backbone, writing songs that highlighted their dual guitar attack and were carried by their pitch-perfect vocal harmonies. It’d take the band a decade to release their first full-length album, but 2017’s Fear of Missing Out was a perfect distillation of everything they’d been working toward. And now, with the Dear Beer EP, they’re proving that there’s plenty more where that came from.

The four new tracks that make up Dear Beer are as distinct as they are powerful. “The song ‘Dear Beer’ was collectively everyone in the band’s favorite song,” says Razavi, and it’s easy to see why. Where Fear of Missing Out saw Razavi and van Dam throwing out pointed lyrical jabs, Dear Beer ups the introspection. Make no mistake, there’s still a bit of bile getting spit up, but there’s just the right amount of levity mixed in. It’s what allows these songs to work as stories, ones that are resonant for the band members, and will surely hit home for anyone who plays Dear Beer all the way through.

“I love a song where the lyrics tell a story, and although I may have never experienced anything like what is happening in that story, the song allows me to put myself in that person’s place,” says Razavi. The Dear Beer EP finds unity in the thematic elements of each song, as each one sees The Bombpops offering up personal anecdotes and crafting songs that have, as Razavi and van Dam intended, a narrative arc. It’s seen in “Dear Beer,” where they swear off drinking alone and vow to stop being “a fucking downer,” a mantra that enables them to cut out the source of the toxicity without a second thought. But even when it gets a little heavy, The Bombpops find ways to make it all feel uplifting.

“‘Dear Beer’ and ‘Turn up the Thermostat’ are particularly dark,” says Razavi, “They’re a bit self-loathing and reflect on negative experiences.” While the lyrics on Dear Beer are culled from difficult experiences, The Bombpops use their buoyant music to push back against the things weighing them down. And of course, it doesn’t hurt that they throw in just the right amount of self-deprecation to keep themselves from ever making it too much of a bummer. “We intentionally put those lyrics to playful, poppy melodies. It weirdly has a therapeutic effect in the long run,” says Razavi. “Making them light and playful makes the thing that seemed so dramatic to us at the time something to laugh about now.”

That balance between the series and the lighthearted is what makes Dear Beer not just the logical evolution of The Bombpops sound, but also the start of a new chapter for the band. It may have taken them a decade to release their first album, but as Dear Beer proves, the wind is at their back, and nothing is going to keep them down.

Counterpunch

https://www.facebook.com/counterpunchrok/

https://counterpunch.bandcamp.com/

Chicago based punk rock band Counterpunch formed in 2004. The lineup currently consists of Eric Hausser, Jared Rohde, Jim Margle (We Are The Union), and Brian Phee (Break The Silence).
Their self—titled debut album was released in 2007 both on their own imprint, Punch It Records, along with Radtone Records in Japan. The next few years were spent perfoming with regional, national, and international acts in support of the release.
Their second full—length record brought them to new heights, expanding their fanbase both domestically and abroad. It was released internationally in late 2010 titled "Heroes & Ghosts" on Radtone Records(Japan), Disconnect Disconnect Records(UK), Funtime Records(Belgium), No Reason Records(Italy), and Fond Of Life Records(Germany). It would later be released by Go Kart Records domestically in the spring of 2011 with alternative artwork by Derek Deal under the title "Dying To Exonerate The World".
Following their first European tour in 2011, Counterpunch would return in the spring of 2012 with spots on both the Groezrock and Jera—On—Air fests. Stops along the way that tour included supporting slots for Nothington, Belvedere, Mute, The Copyrights, Authority Zero and Versus The World.
Since their formation, they have also had the pleasure of sharing the stage both locally and internationally with The Vandals, Strung Out, Death By Stereo, We Are The Union, This Is A Standoff, Rise Against, Alkaline Trio, A Wilhelm Scream, The Swellers, Much The Same, Only Crime and many more building a worldwide following along the way.
In the summer of 2012, the band began writing and recording their long awaited follow—up LP, which will be released on multiple formats in 2014.
Produced, mixed, and engineered by Matt Allison (Alkaline Trio, The Menzingers, Less Than Jake) at Atlas Studios in Chicago and mastered by Stephan Egerton (Descendents) at Armstrong Studios in Tulsa, Oklahoma, "Bruises" features fast paced, fist pumping tracks that combine quintessential elements of the 90's So Cal melodic punk scene with modern day melodic alternative/punk rock.
In November of 2012, Counterpunch made their way down to Costa Rica for both an intimate headlining show and a sold out 2,000 person venue as direct support for Chicago punk stalwarts Rise Against. Look for the band to be performing both local and international shows in support their upcoming LP.

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Performers

Strung Out, The Bombpops, Counterpunch

Date and Time

Location

Lookout Lounge

320 South 72nd Street

Omaha, NE 68114

View Map

Refund Policy

Refunds up to 7 days before event

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