$0 – $700

Starting and Sustaining Conversations about Race in Equity & Justice Work

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El Barrio’s Artspace PS109

215 East 99th Street

New York, NY 10029

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Event description
2-day (9 -5) workshop to build courage and capacity for starting and sustaining conversations about race in our Equity and Justice Work

About this Event

After a diversity or anti-racism awareness training, have you ever asked What’s next now?

With my position, power and/or privilege, what can I do with what I’ve learned?

What is the next level conversation that is needed in my work, organization or team?

How can I lead or support this conversation in a way that trusts BIPOC and acknowledges all of our histories of racialized trauma?

Who: We invite individuals, team members, managers and leaders (1) who have an understanding of structural racism and (2) whose work requires advancing conversations about race and racial equity in multi-racial settings.

Assumptions: We believe that this is a time of rapid prototyping and that many new road maps are emerging as groups and organizations center building racial equity into their structures and impact goals. Our practice is showing us that it is possible to advance racial equity in groups and organizations when we:

  • start the conversation and stay in it;
  • build individual and group capacity to talk about race; and,
  • empower a core team that studies, reflects, learns and practices with each other while guiding the process and keeping the focus on impact.

Intention: This 2-day workshop is not designed as an anti-racism awareness training. It is a peer learning and practice space where participants will be guided through:

  • emerging frameworks/maps for sustaining change initiatives over time;
  • reflection time with application stories that build courage;
  • mindfulness, art and music practices that invite resilience and joy; and,
  • facilitation methodologies that build capacity for sustaining conversations about race that move our equity and justice work forward.

“Racial oppression should always be an emotional topic to discuss. It should always be anger-inducing. As long as racism exists to ruin the lives of countless people of color, it should be something that upsets us. But it upsets us because it exists, not because we talk about it.” Ijeoma Oluo, So You Want to Talk About Race

“The key to moving forward is what we do with our discomfort. We can use it as a door out—blame the messenger and disregard the message. Or we can use it as a door in by asking, Why does this unsettle me? What would it mean for me if this were true?” Robin DiAngelo, White Fragility

“Years as a healer and trauma therapist have taught me that trauma isn’t destiny. The body, not the thinking brain, is where we experience most of our pain, pleasure, and joy, and where we process most of what happens to us. It is also where we do most of our healing, including our emotional and psychological healing. And it is where we experience resilience and a sense of flow.” Resmaa Menakem, My Grandmother's Hands: Racialized Trauma and the Pathway to Mending Our Hearts and Bodies

Please contact us at whatsnextnow2022@gmail.com with questions regarding the program, registration, team rates and fees.

Training Team: What's Next Now is a collective of faciliators dedicated to building individual and collective capacity to have meaningful conversations about race in equity and justice work. Our team for this training has decades of experience working in and for social service, public health, faith-based and justice-focused organizations nationally and internationally. Since 2012, we have been providing workshops on the Art of Hosting communities affected by trauma, transformative conversations about racial equity, and creating resilience through circle and drumming practice. Recently, we collaborated with Restorative Justice NYC on a Circle Summit to accelerate and promote racial, gender, economic and environmental justice. We integrate what we are learning about undoing structural racism and white supremacy from our movement building (i.e., Occupy, Poor People’s Campaign, Climate Justice), organizational change work and study of/with (but not limited to) the People’s Institute Undoing Racism Trainings; Race Forward’s Racial Justice Trainings; Crossroads Continuum on Becoming an Anti-racist Multicultural Organization; Glenn Singleton’s Courageous Conversations about Race; Robin Diangelo’s White Fragility; Resmaa Menakema’s My Grandmother’s Hands; Ijeoma Oluo’s So you Want to Talk About Race; adrienne maree brown’s Emergent Strategy and Ibram X. Kendi’s How to be an Antiracist.

Chantilly Mers-Pickett is a minister, musician and educator. Her work centers on the intersection of popular education, liturgy, and social activism. Drawing from learning through People’s Institute and Crossroads, she has: facilitated conversations among community members and police in the Bronx; organized anti-racism trainings in the Northeastern Region of her denomination; and, frequently, facilitates workshops and training events at the intersections of race, gender, and class. She is most passionate about the ways we create spaces that awaken authenticity, connection and our collective power. A graduate of Union Theological Seminary (MDiv ’11) and ordained in the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), Chantilly currently works as an educator and event specialist with United Methodist Women at The Interchurch Center in New York City.

Kelly McGowan, GoingUpstream.net, partners with community, organizational and movement leaders to transform social problems through participatory strategy development and collective action. She has been active in movements for racial and economic justice since student anti-apartheid activism, ACT-UP and Occupy in NYC. Kelly has co-created both failed and scaled harm reduction interventions at the intersection of social crisis and political will. While her focus is North America, Kelly has worked with social innovators in South America, Africa and Asia. Presently, she is a facilitator with the Emergent Strategy Ideation Institute and an international steward for the Art of Hosting. Kelly earned an MPA from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard and has been a teaching associate with the Wagner School of NYU.

Nancy Fritsche Eagan, LMSW, specializes in participatory leadership, organizational development and project management. She uses Art of Hosting methodologies (i.e., the circle way, appreciative inquiry, open space, world café, storytelling) to co-design and co-facilitate conversations about purpose, process, equity, results and impact in social sector organizations. Nancy applies the Sanctuary Model® and integrates other trauma informed and resilience practices into her practice. Nancy’s organizational affiliations and clients include: the LEAD Diversity Council at Good Shepherd Services; The Support Center for Non-Profit Management; Eileen Fisher Company; Children’s Aid Society: StoryCorps; NYC Department of Probation; Human Resources Administration NYC; and New York City’s Department of Citywide Administrative Services. Nancy served on the Board of the Berkana Institute and regularly presents at the NGO UN Commission on the Status of Women. She is a founding member @Center for Social Innovation and a board member of The Circle Way.

Richard Rivera, President of Renew & Redesign Consulting, works with organizations to build capacity around leadership development, race equity and organizational transition/ change management. He has been facilitating participatory strategic dialogues for over 20 years, bringing together unlikely allies to co-create more life affirming stories for their communities and organizations. Rich is a global steward of the Art of Hosting Conversations that Matter and also serves on the Circle Way board. Richard currently serves as facilitator/coach on race conversations for the New York Community Trust Leadership Fellows Program. He has led organization race equity conversations with large service organizations such as Good Shepherd Services and with small nonprofits such as the Women Against Abuse in Philadelphia. Rich currently serves as a consultant/facilitator to the Bushwick Community Partnership where he has facilitated collaborative community conversations on family/child well-being, race equity and collective impact.

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Date and Time

Location

El Barrio’s Artspace PS109

215 East 99th Street

New York, NY 10029

View Map

Refund Policy

Contact the organizer to request a refund.

Eventbrite's fee is nonrefundable.

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