SOLD OUT eTown Live Radio Show Taping w/ Dar Williams and Piers Faccini
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SOLD OUT eTown Live Radio Show Taping w/ Dar Williams and Piers Faccini

SOLD OUT eTown Live Radio Show Taping w/ Dar Williams and Piers Faccini

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eTown Hall

1535 Spruce St.

Boulder, CO 80302

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More than just a regular concert, eTown is a unique live experience! Audience members will watch the eTown Broadcast recorded before their very eyes, complete with performances and interviews with both of our visiting artists, as well as the eChievement Award segment, eTown's opportunity to honor everyday heroes who are doing their part to make the world a better place. You won't want to miss it!

Doors: 6:00pm
Show Start: 7:00pm
Show End: 9:00pm




Dar Williams

The initial idea came in a flash. Dar Williams was driving on an isolated highway, crossing from New York into Ontario, surrounded by frozen fields, silver trees, and empty sky, when inspiration struck.

“I thought, ‘I want to write a biker song!,’” Williams says with a laugh. “And then my second thought was, ‘I want to write an epic biker song.’ The Greek messenger of the dead is named Hermes, and I want to write about him-the god of travelers and thieves.

“I had this picture of Hermes starting to take a silver-haired woman down to her death, as she’s asked him to do, and instead he seduces her, saying ‘I love people like you who are experienced and worldly.’ And then I thought, why don’t I really freak out my record company and make a whole album about Greek mythology? So I decided to look at each of the gods of the Parthenon and see if their stories sprang to life for me or not.”

And from that moment came “You Will Ride With Me Tonight,” the fifth song on In the Time of Gods, the ninth studio album by the beloved singer-songwriter. Produced by Kevin Killen (who has worked with such giants as U2, Elvis Costello, and Peter Gabriel), and featuring a remarkable set of musicians including Larry Campbell, Charley Drayton, Gerry Leonard, and Rob Hyman, the ten songs that resulted from exploring this theme became some of the richest music and most evocative writing of Williams’s career.

The complex and mysterious world of mythology aligned with several other issues that Williams was grappling with. “I’m interested in power right now,” she says. “I’m in my 40s, and I’m shocked that the café conversations I had in my 20s-’Somebody has to do something!’- are now my responsibility. I see people who are actually doing things that you always dreamed somebody would do, and I can help make that a reality. So the stakes are higher, in a good way, but you also see the shadow, the reckless behavior, where a person can lose it all in a weekend.”

Of course, the ceaseless turmoil in the world today is of great concern to this seasoned artist who’s also a wife, mother and “involved neighbor,” as she puts it, active in her community. “A lot of what’s going on is actually really gross,” she says, “and to see it as epic, instead of doomed, is helpful for me. These stories and characters helped me make sense of it.”

Williams, though, wanted to be sure that she was serving the songs themselves, and was prepared to abandon the mythology theme any time it didn’t naturally fit; “I didn’t want it to be a gimmick or a test,” she says. But she was pleased to find how flexible and expansive these archetypes really are. “The Light and the Sea” began with the notion of the sea god Poseidon, but became a meditation on retaining a moral compass.

“As I get older, my big struggle isn’t being virtuous and moral, it’s more about what I do in chaos,” says Williams. “When I’m stressed out, I say and do terrible things. There’s a light to follow, and you can lose it in chaos.”

Other songs brought ancient themes directly into the Hudson Valley home Williams shares with her husband, their son, and their young, Ethiopian-born daughter. She describes “Write This Number Down” as “an Athena-ish song” written for her younger child. “It’s telling her not to lose faith, because even when the justice system isn’t up to what you want it to be, there will be networks of people who will help you find justice.”

Williams also wanted to write a song for her husband. “When I go on the road, there’s an understanding that it is part of our relationship,” she says. “In the Parthenon, there is one goddess-Vesta, goddess of the hearth-who sits in the middle of the hall stoking the fire. I never thought that I needed a hearth, but that’s my home, and also my marriage, an anchor in my life that just gets better all the time. So ‘I’ve Been Around the World’ does correlate, but I would have written that story no matter what.”

As documented on her last album, the 2010 two-disc retrospective Many Great Companions, Williams’s growth as an individual over her almost two-decade-long career has gone hand-in-hand with her evolution as an artist. Raised in Chappaqua, N.Y., and educated at Wesleyan University, Williams spent 10 years living in the thriving artistic community of Northampton, Mass., where she began to make the rounds on the coffeehouse circuit. Joan Baez, an early fan of her music, took Williams out on the road and recorded several of her songs.

In 1995, two years after self-releasing The Honesty Room, she signed with Razor & Tie Entertainment, beginning a relationship now in its 16th year. Along with her studio albums, she’s also released the onstage document Out There Live (2001) and the DVD Live at Bearsville Theater (2007).

The final song on In the Time of Gods manages to bring all of her concerns-social, creative, and personal-under one roof. “We have a mountain close to our house called Storm King,” says Williams. “When a circle of clouds gathers around the top of it, that means the rain is coming. Pete Seeger lives across the river and can see the mountain, and I wrote a song saying that Pete is the storm king now. He looks down and watches over us, guides and warns us, like the mountain does.

Piers Faccini


Cevennes, France – Monday, August 29, 2016 – Not a day sooner could Piers Faccini have penned the 10 songs featured on his latest full-length studio recording, I Dreamed An Island (Six Degrees Records; October 21, 2016). Writing in real time as history unfolds and observing the troubled world in which we live, the British songwriter living in southern France responds with a heartfelt conviction. With songs such as “Oiseau” written the day after the 2015 Paris attacks as a plea to the world to wake from its terrorist nightmare; “Drone” describing the aftermath of a Syrian drone strike on a devastated town; and “Bring Down The Wall” as a response to a U.S. presidential candidate’s idea of building a wall along the US-Mexico border, Faccini sets poetry in motion with reflections on today’s perplexing times.

I Dreamed An Island is a personal quest for Piers Faccini and the album describes his voyage towards an imagined haven through the storms of fear and intolerance currently brewing around the world. Sung mostly in English but in French, Italian dialects and Arabic, too, the album is an impassioned celebration of cultural diversity and pluralism. Searching for a bygone golden era when coexistence and religious tolerance once prevailed, Faccini found a model for his utopian haven in 12th Century Sicily. At the crossroads of Western, Arabic and Byzantine influence, the island briefly flourished as the most enlightened and advanced society in medieval Europe.

Faccini’s latest compositions depict the unique moment of creative cohabitation between peoples and faiths. Inspired by traditions centuries old -- but firmly 21st century in its blending of languages, narratives and instrumental arrangements -- electric guitars converse across time with a Baroque viola d’amore, while an oud answers a medieval psaltery and a Moroccan guembri pulses trance-like to the drums.

Growing up in a trilingual family (English, Italian, French), I Dreamed An Island mirrors Faccini’s own background. The songs resonate with the voices of his migrant ancestors – and his island is a Mediterranean multilingual refuge, where orange groves, horseshoe arches, gold leaf, lapis lazuli and stories abound. Upon listening to the 10 original pieces on I Dreamed An Island, a sense of nostalgia lingers for Faccini’s dreamed up utopia; an island that today seems more remote and more necessary than ever before.

Alongside Faccini, who plays a number of string instruments including a customized guitar with additional mini-frets to play quarter tones, I Dreamed An Island features a cast of multinational musicians including: Italian drummer/percussionist Simone Prattico; Tunisian violinist Jasser Haj Youssef; American double bassist Chris Wood (Medeski Martin & Wood); Franco-Iranian percussionist and saz player Bijan Chemirani; Cameroonian bassist Hilaire Penda; Italian Baroque guitarist Luca Tarantino; American psaltery player Bill Cooley; French world music pioneer and guembri player Loy Ehrlich (Toure Kunda, Alain Peters); and the English bassist Pat Donaldson (Fotheringay, Sandy Denny).

The stateside release of I Dreamed An Island follows Faccini’s 2016 recording collaboration with Brooklyn-based singer-songwriter Dawn Landes on the EP, Desert Songs (January 2016). An intimate suite of five compositions, Desert Songs is a meditative gem worthy of being at the top of indie-folk fans’ playlists. In 2014, Faccini’s collaborative album, Songs of Time Lost, with cellist Vincent Ségal ranked among NPR’s “Top 10 World Music Albums of 2014” and Songlines’ “Top 10 Albums of 2014.” Faccini has toured with artists such as Ben Harper, Amadou & Mariam, Ballake Sissoko, and his recording catalogue includes several solo albums – Leave No Trace (2004) Tearing Sky (2006), Two Grains of Sand (2009, voted "Album of the Year" by French radio France Inter), My Wilderness (2011), Between Dogs and Wolves (2013), the DVD A New Morning (2013), and the poetry book/CD, No One’s Here (2016).

A poet, painter, and musician, Faccini has beautifully documented the making of I Dreamed An Island with notebooks and sketches filled with insights on the inspiration for the songs as well as artwork, stories and recording sessions all collected on his blog: idreamedanisland.com

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