SIR MIX-A-LOT | Nick Weaver | Landon Wordswell | DJ Indica Jones
$22
SIR MIX-A-LOT | Nick Weaver | Landon Wordswell | DJ Indica Jones

SIR MIX-A-LOT | Nick Weaver | Landon Wordswell | DJ Indica Jones

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Nectar Lounge

412 North 36th Street

Seattle, WA 98103

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2.3 Friday (Hip-Hop)
Nectar & SolidSound present:
SIR MIX-A-LOT
Nick Weaver
Landon Wordswell
DJ Indica Jones
Special Guests
$22 - $25
8pm doors
21+




SIR MIX-A-LOT

Sir Mix-A-Lot parlayed a gonzo tribute to women with large buttocks into hip-hop immortality. But even before he struck crossover gold, Sir Mix-A-Lot was one of rap’s great D.I.Y. success stories. Coming from a city — Seattle — with barely any hip-hop scene to speak of, Mix-A-Lot co-founded his own record label, promoted his music himself, produced all his own tracks, and essentially pulled himself up by the proverbial American bootstraps. Even before “Baby Got Back,” Mix-A-Lot was a platinum-selling album artist with a strong following in the hip-hop community, known for bouncy, danceable, bass-heavy tracks indebted to old-school electro. However, it took signing with Rick Rubin’s Def American label — coupled with an exaggerated, parodic pimp image — to carry him into the mainstream. Perceived as a one-hit novelty, he found it difficult to follow his breakout success, but kept on recording, and even toured as part of a rap-rock supergroup called Subset, a collaboration with the Presidents of the United States of America. Sir Mix-A-Lot was born Anthony Ray in Seattle on August 12, 1963. An eclectic music fan but a rabid hip-hop devotee, he was already actively rapping in the early ’80s, and cofounded the Nastymix record label in 1983 with his DJ, Nasty Nes, who also hosted Seattle’s first hip-hop radio show. His first single was 1987ʹs “Posse on Broadway,” which referred to a street in Seattle, not New York; it became a local hit, and paved the way for his first LP, 1988ʹs Swass, which also featured the popular novelty “Square Dance Rap,” and a Run-D.M.C.-style cover of Black Sabbath’s “Iron Man,” with backing by Seattle thrashers Metal Church. The video for “Posse on Broadway” landed some airplay on MTV, and became Sir Mix-A-Lot’s first national chart single in late 1988; that in turn pushed Swass into the Top 20 of the R&B album chart, and by 1989, it had sold over a million copies. Also in 1989, Mix-A-Lot released his follow up album Seminar, which produced three charting singles in “Beepers,” “My Hooptie,” and “I Got Game”; while none were significant crossover hits with pop or R&B audiences, all performed well on the rap singles chart, and helped Seminar become Mix-A-Lot’s second straight platinum album. Financial disputes with Nastymix resulted in a fierce court battle and ended Mix-A-Lot’s association with the label. Fortunately, Def American head Rick Rubin stepped in to offer him a major-label contract. Mix-A-Lot had long had a knack for mimicking (and mocking) the pimps he’d watched while growing up in Seattle, and adopted their visual style with Rubin’s encouragement. He debuted for Def American with 1992ʹs Mack Daddy, whose first single, “One Time’s Got No Case,” was a critique of racial profiling by police. It went virtually unheard, but the follow-up, “Baby Got Back,” became a pop phenomenon virtually from the moment MTV aired its provocative video (which was eventually consigned to eveninghours only). Seldom does a comic novelty song spark such a fierce cultural debate: no matter how ridiculous it sounded, “Baby Got Back” touched on highly sensitive, hot-button issues of race and sex with a cheerful, good-natured crudeness that was guaranteed to offend more than a few. Was it a token of appreciation for women whose body types were rarely given positive cultural attention, or just another sexist objectification? Was it an indictment of narrow, white-dictated beauty standards that left many typical black women (and the black men who loved them) out in the cold, or did it simply build up one type of woman by denigrating another? Feminists picketed Sir Mix-A-Lot concerts all across the country that summer, but despite their efforts, record buyers sided with the rapper: “Baby Got Back” spent five weeks atop the pop charts, selling over two million copies; it also pushed Mack Daddy into the Top Ten, and went on to win a Grammy for Best Rap Solo Performance. Billboard magazine ranked it as the second biggest single of the year, behind only Boyz II Men’s juggernaut “End of the Road.



Nick Weaver

Nick Weaver is a Seattle hip hop musician and producer who never settles. Growing up in the northwest, Weaver saw a childhood flooded with various musical influence. Playing piano, singing whatever was on the radio, rapping to anything that listened, his performance bug always itched. Weaver cites his big brother and childhood peers for pushing him towards classic hip hop, skewing him heavily towards east coast and west coast superstars of the 90's. After spending a few years in LA tuning his craft and working with close friend Hilsyde, he returned home to Seattle. Bringing candid, honest lyrics to big beats, Weaver's music is clearly engrained with his own style. Live shows packed with heart and sweat, he makes sure the crowd feels what he's got to say. No matter the levels of recognition attained, Nick Weaver lets it bleed through.


Landon Wordswell

Landon Wordswell is a 27 year old San Francisco, CA & Eugene, OR resident. These two cities combined have influenced the emcee's tenacity, perspective, and insight. Landon's stage performance & delivery have been praised on tours both nationally &
internationally for it's captivating crowd appeal & intricate rhyme schemes being coupled with tightly knitted personal lyrics. He has mastered his stage performance over the years by performing nights for audience's enjoying intimate showings of 20 folks to state of the art venues mounting in as many as 10,000 heads in attendance. The release of his first album, The Mourning After Pill (The MAP), gained him international notoriety by landing on a list of the top 20 most downloaded albums of March 2013 on bandcamp alongside such caliber as Ghostface Killah and many other well known artists. The MAP wouldn't be Landon's first taste of success though. Wordswell, under the moniker of "Youngs" at the time, had peaked at number 2 in the Japanese hip hop charts during his college years for a single pushed there by Origami/Shibuya Records on an album entitled "Revenge of Soul". Now in 2015 Landon is signed to both Cult Classic Records (London, UK) & Blue Bottle Records (New Zealand). Landon crossed paths with the legendary Gift of Gab by opening a show in Nevada City, CA on April 13, 2013 while touring to promote "The MAP" & they have been tour partners ever since. Landon Wordswell has also performed alongside greats such as Talib Kweli, Mobb Deep, Zion I, Raekwon (Wu-Tang), Devin The Dude, Aceyalone, Freestyle Fellowship & many, many more.



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Nectar Lounge

412 North 36th Street

Seattle, WA 98103

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