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RF can't hurt you...can it? RF Safety Awareness for SBE and SMPTE Members...

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Rohde and Schwarz

6821 Benjamin Franklin Dr

Columbia, MD 21046

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**Society of Broadcast Engineers chapters 37 DC and 46 Baltimore and SMPTE DC MEETING NOTICE**



The Society of Broadcast Engineers chapters 37 DC and 46 Baltimore, Rohde and Schwartz, and SMPTE DC section presents:


"RF can't hurt you...can it? RF Safety Awareness for SBE and SMPTE Members sponsored by Rohde and Schwartz.


WHO SHOULD ATTEND?

Transmitter engineers / Field engineers, ENG / Satellite transmit / Microwave transmit engineers and operators, Company health and safety personnel, and those that just want to know more about the effects of RF radiation on the human body. Risk mitigation, Safety awareness, Broadcast transmit facilities, plus Environmental health and safety personnel will also benefit.


DATE:

October 8, 2019

TIME:

9:00 am ET - 5:30 pm ET

AGENDA:

9:00 am Breakfast and Networking
10:00 am SBE/SMPTE business and introductions
10:15 am Morning session
12:00-1:00 pm Onsite lunch
1:00-4:30 pm Afternoon session with 2:45 pm refreshment break
4:30-5:30 pm Rohde and Schwartz laboratory calibration and repair center tours and transmitter product show


LOCATION:

Rohde and Schwarz transmitter and test gear manufacturers:
Conveniently located between Washington DC and Baltimore, just off I-95 and adjacent BWI airport
6821 Benjamin Franklin Dr, Columbia, MD 21046

Don’t delay, limited seating available. No cost but need to RSVP to hold your seat and order enough food. If you cannot make it please contact us to release seat for someone else.


PRESENTER:

Richard Tell of Richard Tell Associates, Inc.


PROGRAM:

RF can't hurt you...can it? RF Safety Awareness for SBE and SMPTE Members

Morning Session:

▪ Why should I view this presentation?
▪ How can I be sure I will be safe?
▪ How can exposure to RF be a hazard?
▪ What are examples of RF radiating systems
▪ What is a hazardous level of exposure?
▪ How can I avoid over-exposure?
▪ What does time-averaging of RF exposure mean?
▪ What can lead to an RF burn?
▪ What is some practical guidance for SBE workers when close to antennas?

Afternoon Session:

Everything you Ever Wanted to know about RF Safety for SBE and SMPTE Members

The afternoon session will provide detail on the following topics:

▪ The underlying basis of the RF exposure limits
▪ Specific absorption rates (SARs), coupling of RF fields to the body and the “gain” of the human body
▪ The FCC RF exposure limits, safety factors, averaging times, spatial averaging, relevant units of measure
▪ Why the OSHA standard is not used at broadcast facilities
▪ Contact and induced currents have never been included in the FCC regs but the IEEE standard does
▪ Changes in how newly revised IEEE and ICNIRP exposure limits are to be applied (will the FCC adopt these some day?)
▪ RF burns- the most hazardous aspect of RF exposure
▪ Interference with medical devices
▪ Near-field gain of antennas and beam formation, not something normally talked about but relevant to safety
▪ Radiated fields from dish antennas, power density and size (when less can be more
▪ Quantifying potential exposure using analysis and measurement
▪ The famous FCC ground reflection factor of 2.56, when and how to use
▪ How ground level RF fields depend on antenna element spacing
▪ Stealth broadcast sites don’t exist but use caution when antennas are not visible
▪ How portable devices are qualified for RF safety, local SAR, the 20 cm criterion
▪ Instrumentation commonly used for assessing potential exposure, calibration, uncertainties
▪ How measurements can get screwed up because of interaction with your body
▪ The application of personal RF monitors, their ups and downs, what to do when they alarm
▪ Using lockout/tagout procedures during work when very high exposures may occur
▪ Practical ways to avoid overexposure
▪ The complication of establishing “safe distances” for most broadcast antennas
▪ RF protective clothing (RF suits), the pluses and minuses, when to use, when NOT to use ▪ RF safety signage, when and where it should be installed, what it looks like
▪ Induced currents on power lines; tower detuning issues related to RF safety
▪ Induced currents/voltages on cranes near AM radio stations
▪ Hot AM tower climbing (when induced currents get real important)
▪ Assessing compliance with FCC rules at broadcast sites (how a rigid measurement approach can miss the whole point of an RF survey)
▪ When are “barriers” really needed (indicative vs positive access control)
▪ Establishing an RF safety program at your facility (what’s involved and what you need to know).


DIRECTIONS & MAP:

Rohde and Schwarz transmitter and test gear manufacturers:
Conveniently located between Washington DC and Baltimore, just off I-95 and adjacent BWI airport
6821 Benjamin Franklin Dr, Columbia, MD 21046

MAP

https://sbe37.org

https://www.rohde-schwarz.com/us/about_united_states/who_we_are_and_what_we_do/who-we-are-and-what-we-do_230439.html


ABOUT THE PRESENTER:

Mr. Tell, a Life Fellow of the IEEE, has 51 years of experience working on issues related to radiofrequency (RF) hazards. During the first 20 years of his professional career within the federal government, he worked first for the Center for Devices and Radiological Health and then for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency where he served as Chief of the Electromagnetics Branch. In that capacity, he supported the agency's program to develop a public exposure standard for RF fields and did extensive work related to RF instrumentation evaluation, computer modeling of antennas and national field studies to measure environmental levels of RF fields. During his tenure at the EPA, his program provided technical support to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) as the FCC adopted new rules for human exposure to RF fields. For the past 31 years, Mr. Tell has pursued his own scientific consulting practice related to electromagnetic field exposure assessment.

Richard earned the B.S. degree in physics and mathematics in 1966 from Midwestern State University in Wichita Falls, Texas and the M.S. degree in radiation sciences in 1967 from Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey. He is a past elected member of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) and presently serves on the NCRP Nonionizing Radiation Advisory Panel. He also serves as Chairman of Subcommittee 2 of the IEEE Standards Coordinating Committee TC-95 on RF in the International Committee on Electromagnetic Radiation Safety (ICES). He is Chair of the IEEE Committee on Man and Radiation (COMAR) and has authored numerous reports, publications and book chapters related to evaluating electromagnetic fields from a hazards perspective and is a frequent participant in national and international workshops related to electromagnetic field hazards and safety standards development.

Mr. Tell was born January 25, 1944 in Roscoe, Texas. He is married to Valeria Ann Tell and has three children and two grandchildren. Ric has been a licensed amateur radio operator since 1959 and holds the call sign K5UJU as an Extra Class licensee.

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Rohde and Schwarz

6821 Benjamin Franklin Dr

Columbia, MD 21046

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