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QUT Creative Industries Indigenous Seminar Series 2017

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Level 6, Building Z9

QUT Creative Industries Precinct

CornerMusk Avenue and Gona Parade

Kelvin Grove, Qld 4059

Australia

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The inaugural QUT Creative Industries Indigenous Seminar Series convened by Dr Sandra R. Phillips disseminates unique scholarship from Indigenous researchers and academics. Transdisciplinary and interdisciplinary scholarship relevant to 21st century creative industries will be presented and discussed. Each seminar features a presentation from an expert Indigenous researcher who will engage with the audience and invited QUT discussant.

Seminar #1: 21 April, 2017 Associate Professor Bronwyn Carlson with Professor Jean Burgess
Seminar #2: 2 June, 2017 Fiona Foley with Dr Keith Armstrong
Seminar #3: 21 September, 2017 Dr Romaine Moreton and Dr Lou Bennett with Dr Verena Thomas
Seminar #4: 23 November, 2017 Distinguished Prof Aileen Moreton-Robinson with Professor Gene Moyle

SEMINAR #4
The possessive logic of patriarchal white sovereignty: resisting reconciliation.

In the year 2000 Australia hosted the Olympic games in Sydney. As a nation, whose national identity is strongly tied to sport, many Australians hoped the achievements at the 1956 Melbourne Olympics would be exceeded. Australian media coverage was unprecedented and the nation was primed for the Olympics. The nation’s hopes for gold were pinned on two athletes: Ian Thorpe and Cathy Freeman. Thorpe and Freeman lived up to the nation’s expectations winning their respective 400 metre events in swimming and athletics.

However, their achievements were represented very differently within public discourse. Ian Thorpe was represented as swimming for the nation, acknowledged by being recognised as Young Australian of the Year in 2000, while Cathy Freeman was running for reconciliation. In the Olympic games marketing fact file on the Sydney 2000 Olympics Cathy’s win is described as:

"Freeman rose to her feet again, asked permission to embrace the crowd, and ran to accept an Australian flag and an Aboriginal flag from spectators. She proudly waved both in a victory lap that was seen as reconciliation for all Australians (Olympic marketing fact file 2016:5)."

Reconciliation is an initiative of the state, some would argue a decolonising strategy, so what are we to make of one body being inextricably tied to representing the nation while the other is fastened to reconciling it? In this discursive move what logics and presuppositions are at work to make the Aboriginal female body responsible for reconciliation? In this paper I argue that the possessive logics of patriarchal white sovereignty operate discursively in the discourse of reconciliation to protect, recuperate and reinscribe the nation as a white possession by configuring reconciliation as an Aboriginal possession.

Dr Aileen Moreton-Robinson is a Goenpul woman of the Quandamooka people (Moreton Bay). She is Australia’s first Indigenous Distinguished Professor and is Professor of Indigenous Research in the Indigenous Research and Engagement Unit at QUT. She was formerly the Director of the Australian Research Council’s National Indigenous Research and Knowledges Network (NIRAKN).

Distinguished Professor Moreton-Robinson is a member of the Executive of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Higher Education Consortium (NATSIHEC), an advisory body to the Minister for Education and Training, Senator Simon Birmingham. Prior to her life in the academy she worked in public administration and has served as a board member on a number of Indigenous community organisations.

Professor Moreton-Robinson’s publications have international standing and global reach. She is the most cited Indigenous scholar in Australia for single authored publications and is a member of the editorial board of several prestigious journals in the USA and Europe. She was elected to the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association’s (NAISA) inaugural nomination’s committee as Chairperson in 2008 and to the NAISA board in 2012. She has presented invited keynotes, public lectures and seminars at Universities in Italy, Germany, New Zealand, Hawaii, France, Britain, Canada, USA and Switzerland.

DISCUSSANT: Professor Gene Moyle is Head, School of Creative Practice, Creative Industries Faculty and has worked across a dynamic mix of fields including the performing arts, elite sport and the corporate sectors. http://staff.qut.edu.au/staff/moyleg/

Free. All welcome. Please RSVP by Tuesday 21 November

FAQs

What are my transportation/parking options for getting to and from the event?

Undercover parking is available at 88 Musk Avenue and under Woolworths. Limited street parking is available in the Kelvin Grove Village near Creative Industries Precinct and a limited number of pay and display parks are available on Gona Parade.

Most surrounding streets fall within the Brisbane Central Traffic Area. In this area, you can park for a maximum of two hours on unsigned streets unless there are parking meters or signs showing otherwise. The two-hour limit applies from Monday to Friday 7am to 6pm, and Saturday 7am to 12 midday. For more information, visit the QUT Facilities Management page for up-to-date information on casual parking locations and fees at QUT's Kelvin Grove campus.

How can I contact the organizer with any questions?
Dr Sandra Phillips sr.phillips@qut.edu.au

Gillian Ridsdale g.ridsdale@qut.edu.au



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Location

Level 6, Building Z9

QUT Creative Industries Precinct

CornerMusk Avenue and Gona Parade

Kelvin Grove, Qld 4059

Australia

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