Free

Public Lecture: The Search for Life in Oceans Beyond Earth

Event Information

Share this event

Date and Time

Location

Location

National Academy of Sciences

2101 Constitution Ave., N.W.

Washington, D.C. 20418

View Map

Event description

Description

Where is the best place to find living life beyond Earth? It may be that the small, ice-covered moons of Jupiter and Saturn harbor some of the most habitable real estate in our Solar System. Life loves liquid water and these moons have lots of it!

Dr. Kevin Hand will explain the science behind why we think we know these oceans exist and what we know about the conditions on these worlds. He will focus on Jupiter’s moon Europa, which is a top priority for future NASA missions. Dr. Hand will also show how the exploration of Earth’s ocean is helping to inform our understanding of the potential habitability of worlds like Europa. Dr. Hand was a scientist onboard James Cameron’s 2012 dive to the bottom of the Mariana Trench, and he was part of a 2003 IMAX expedition to hydrothermal vents in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. He has made nine dives to the bottom of the ocean.

Date and Time: Wednesday, March 29, 2017 at 7:00 pm

Location: National Academy of Sciences Building, 2101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, DC, 20418

The talk is part of Space Science Week 2017—a three-day gathering of the Space Studies Board and Board on Physics and Astronomy to discuss issues and advances in their fields. Inquiries may be directed to spaceweek@nas.edu.




Kevin Hand


Dr. Kevin P. Hand is Deputy Chief Scientist for Solar System Exploration at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. His research focuses on the origin, evolution, and distribution of life in the solar system with an emphasis on Jupiter’s moon, Europa. His work involves both theoretical and laboratory research on the physics and chemistry of icy moons in the outer solar system. His work has brought him to the Dry Valleys of Antarctica, the depths of the Earth’s oceans, and to the glaciers of Kilimanjaro. In 2011 he was selected as a National Geographic Emerging Explorer. Hand earned his PhD from Stanford University and bachelors degrees from Dartmouth College. He was born and raised in Manchester, Vermont.




TRANSPORTATION AND PARKING

The closest Metro station is the Foggy Bottom-GWU metro stop, on the orange, silver, or blue line. Turn right when you exit the metro. Walk south down 23rd Street, NW for approximately 7 blocks. Turn left onto C Street, NW (after the State Department). Cross 22nd Street. The entrance is located at 2100 C Street.

For driving directions to the National Academy of Sciences building, visit the National Academies website. Limited parking is available in the visitors parking area of the building, accessible from the 21st St. side of the building. Parking is provided on a first-come basis, and overflow is directed to public parking garages. The public parking facilities closest to the NAS Building are Colonial Parking (20th Street, NW, between E and F Streets) and Columbia Plaza (23rd and Virginia Avenue, NW).




National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine

Share with friends

Date and Time

Location

National Academy of Sciences

2101 Constitution Ave., N.W.

Washington, D.C. 20418

View Map

Save This Event

Event Saved