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Public Forum: Breaking the News? The Uncertainty of Media Manipulation in C...

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Sir G Williams University Alumni Auditorium, Henry F. Hall Building, Concordia University

1455 Boulevard de Maisonneuve O

Montreal

Canada

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Registration is now open for the CSDC’s Public Forum ‘Breaking the News?’

IMPORTANT INFORMATION

Registration – The event is free and open to the public, however, places in the conference room are limited and registration is therefore required.

Twitter – You can live-tweet using @CSDC_CECD

The main language of the public forum will be English, but simultaneous translation will be provided in French.

THE FORUM

The Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship will be hosting a public forum on the ‘ambivalence’ of tactical media in politics. The forum will take place on May 10, 2018 and will start at 7pm at the Sir G Williams University Alumni Auditorium in the Henry F. Hall Building of Concordia University (1455 Boulevard de Maisonneuve O, Montreal).

The media is a battlefield. Activists on all sides interrupt the broadcast to push their own into the news cycle. From the Yes Men’s pranks to latest conspiracy video trending on YouTube, these interventions have allowed partisans to make an outsized impact on public discourse. As provincial and federal elections near, tactical media’s uncertain consequences for democracy in Quebec and Canada is a matter of urgent public concern. In this forum, our participants will survey the tricky terrain of media manipulation. Where is the line between media activism and political sabotage? And, in a world made meme, what’s the difference between pranks and propaganda?

THE DEBATERS

    • Elizabeth Dubois (@lizdubois), PhD writes, speaks, and teaches at the intersection of technology and politics. Technology critic meets advocate meets academic, she is an Assistant Professor at the University of Ottawa. Her work examines digital media, influence and political engagement. Elizabeth is a graduate of the Oxford Internet Institute at the University of Oxford where she completed a DPhil (PhD) in Information, Communication and the Social Sciences as well as an MSc in the Social Sciences of the Internet (distinction). As a Public Policy Forum Fellow Elizabeth is investigating public policy options around the future of news. She is also on the Advisory Board for Ottawa Civic Tech and an Academic Advisor for Samara.
    • Rebecca Lewis (@beccalew) is a Researcher at Data & Society Research Institute, where she focuses on media manipulation, disinformation, and online extremism. She holds an MSc in Social Science from the Oxford Internet Institute, where she researched the role of information technologies in media and politics. She also worked with the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism, where she contributed to research analyzing the rise of digital news intermediaries. She previously worked in social media analytics and received her BA in Film Studies from Columbia University.
    • Miranda J. Brady (@MirandaJBrady), PhD is an associate professor in the School of Journalism and Communication at Carleton University and a co-director of the Centre for Indigenous Research, Culture, Language, and Education (CIRCLE). She is a settler from traditional Pomo territories in Northern California who currently lives on unceded, unsurrendered Algonquin territories in Ottawa. Her research over the past 15 years has focused on Indigenous identity in the media. She has published a number of academic book chapters and journal articles and is co-author with John M.H. Kelly of the book We Interrupt This Program: Indigenous Media Tactics in Canadian Culture (UBC Press, 2017).
    • John Kelly is from Skidegate, a Haida village on Haida Gwaii, islands 80 kilometres off the British Columbia coast. Dr. Kelly is an adjunct research professor in journalism at Carleton University in Ottawa. He serves as co-director of Carleton Centre for Indigenous Research, Culture, Language and Education (CIRCLE) and is a member of the university’s Indigenous Education Council. He also co-authored with Miranda Brady a new book released recently by UBC Press, We Interrupt This Program: Indigenous Media Tactics in Canadian Culture. Dr. Kelly has worked closely with indigenous language and cultural revitalization and preservation programs.
    • Ryan Scrivens (@R_Scrivens) studies right-wing extremism, terrorism and extremism online. He is a Horizon Postdoctoral Fellow at Concordia University, Canada, working with Project SOMEONE to build resilience against hatred and radicalization leading to violent extremism, both on- and offline. Dr. Scrivens has presented before the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and the Canadian Security Intelligence Service. His work has also been featured in BBC News, The New York Times, and CBC News.
  • Moderator (TBA)

For more information, please visit: http://csdc-cecd.ca/public-forum-breaking-news-uncertainty-media-manipulation-canadian-politics/


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Sir G Williams University Alumni Auditorium, Henry F. Hall Building, Concordia University

1455 Boulevard de Maisonneuve O

Montreal

Canada

View Map

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