Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts @ PACE Colloquium Series

Event Information

Share this event

Date and Time

Location

Location

Bianco Room

9 Spruce Street

New York, NY 10038

View Map

Event description

Description

Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity and the Arts @ PACE - Colloquium Series

The 2019 PACA@PACE Colloquium will be the formal launch of the Pace Institute for Creativity (PIC) and include introductions from the PIC professors, Beijing Normal Univeristy, and APA Division 10. The keynote address will be given by Dr. Robert J. Sternberg on developing a test of scientific reasoning. Additionally, Dr. Jen Katz-Buonincontro and Dr. Roger Beaty will give presentations on creativity and learning and the neuroscience of creativity cognition. Attendees are invited to bring creativity-related posters for a free-style poster session.



PACA@Pace 2019 Program Schedule

9:30AM: REGISTRATION

Sign in, mingle, and enjoy some coffee and tea!


10:00AM: INTRODUCTIONS

Introductions and announcements from the Pace Institute for Creativity, Beijing Normal University, and APA Division 10!


10:30AM: PRESENTATION BY JENNIFER KATZ-BUONINCONTRO, PH.D (DREXEL UNIVERSITY, PA)

Title: Mindset Mania: The use of drawing to understand scientific concepts

Abstract: The growth mindset studies now permeating popular culture and educational rhetoric also garner interest from creativity researchers and educators. This talk will review this trend and explain how Dr. Katz-Buonincontrostarted research on creative mindsets. She will describe recent mixed methods research studies examining creative mindsets that show a divergence between measured and narrative explanations of growth and fixed creative mindsets, as well as a newer but equally important emergent construct called “partial” creative growth mindsets in students. Neither fixed nor malleable, partial creative growth mindsets reveal students’ doubt, uncertainty and situational concerns about learning to be creative. The talk with conclude with possible explanations for partial creative growth mindsets and raise questions for future research and teaching.


11:15AM: PRESENTATION BY ROGER BEATY, PH.D (PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY, PA)

Title: The Creating Brain: Memory systems, Cognitive Control, and Network Dynamics

Abstract: Creative thinking involves making new connections between concepts stored in memory. But memory retrieval alone does not always lead to the most original ideas—we often need to shift our thinking away from common knowledge to produce something new. How does memory support and constrain our ability to think creatively? In this talk, I will explore some benefits and costs of episodic and semantic memory to creative cognition and discuss how our capacity for cognitive control may play a key role in overcoming constraining effects of prior knowledge. I will present findings from a series of fMRI experiments examining neurocognitive mechanisms of memory retrieval and cognitive control during creative task performance, with a focus on mapping these cognitive processes to brain network dynamics.

12:00PM – 1:30PM: LUNCH AND POSTER SESSION

Lunch will be provided. Attendees are invited to eat and interact with poster presenters.

1:30PM: KEYNOTE ADDRESS BY ROBERT STERNBERG, PH.D (CORNELL UNIVERSITY, NY)

Title: Standardized Tests Don’t Select Creative STEM Thinkers: Here’s What Does

Abstract: Admissions to programs in STEM disciplines, including psychology, often place heavy emphasis on tests that are proxies for measures of general intelligence, such as the SAT, ACT, GRE, and assorted other tests of academic knowledge and cognitive skills. The underlying assumption is that these tests provide good measures of the abilities necessary for success in STEM fields. But what if these tests are missing the actual skills involved in scientific thinking? Worse, what if the tests are measuring the wrong thing and thereby admitting the wrong students?

We have undertaken a set of studies to assess students’ scientific reasoning skills. Instead of measuring merely knowledge and analytic skills, we measure creative, analytical, and practical skills needed for STEM success. Our tests, both in psychology and in other STEM fields, include measurements of skills such as (a) generating scientific hypotheses, (b) generating scientific experiments, (c) drawing scientific conclusions, (d) reviewing scientific articles, and (e) evaluating teaching in science. Our data show that whereas these tests correlate and factor with each other, they are unrelated or, sometimes, negatively related to proxy IQ tests such as the SAT and tests of fluid intelligence. They also factor separately from such proxy IQ tests. Our results suggest that the overuse of proxy IQ tests in STEM admissions may itself be an example of dubious scientific thinking.

2:30PM: WRAP UP




FAQs

How can I contact the organizer with any questions?

Email creativity@pace.edu with any questions and we will get back to you promptly.

Is the event free?

Yes!

When can I register by?

All attendees and poster presenters must register by April 21, 2019 at 11:59PM EST.

Do I have to confirm if I am bringing a poster?

Yes! If you want to present a poster, please select "Yes" to the question "Do you plan on presenting a poster?" You will then be prompted to provide your name, university, poster title, and a three sentence abstract.

Are there assigned locations for the posters?

No, participants can choose where they want to set up their poster.

When should I arrive?

Check in begins at 9:30am.

How do I find the event space?

The event is located at the Bianco Room at One Pace Plaza, New York, NY 10038, located in the main building of Pace University. Attendees should enter the building at the 9 Spruce Street entrace, where they will be guided by security staff.


Share with friends

Date and Time

Location

Bianco Room

9 Spruce Street

New York, NY 10038

View Map

Save This Event

Event Saved