Power Hour: Interrupting Racial & Gender-Based Microaggressions

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Communications Building 126

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Thank you for your interest in this workshop! If you for any reason are unable to attend on May 8th, please release your ticket so we can give it to someone on the anticipated waitlist.
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Microaggressions--everyday verbal slights and behaviors rooted in biases and stereotypes based on race, gender, class, among other social identites--often cause confusion, distress, anger, and a host of other reactions experienced by individuals who are the recipients of such acts.

This Power Hour is geared towards graduate students of color interested in challenging microaggressions that may (or did) occur in the classroom. Graduate students will be introduced to concepts related to microaggressions and strategies to interrupt them on campus and in our everyday lives.

This discussion will be co-lead by Elba Moise & Marcus Johnson, PhD students in Communication.

Please join us over a light lunch while we develop new techniques to KEEP US LIVING OUR BEST LIFE!


About our Presenters

Marcus Johnson earned his B.A. Global Studies (2013) and M.A. in Cultural Studies (2016) from the University of Washington Bothell. As a Mary Gates Scholar alum, and 2018-2019 Mellon Fellow, Johnson looks forward to continuing his research on key issues surrounding race, gender and identity. Johnson’s previous work, The Multi Dimensions of Blackness: Cultural Hegemony in the United States and Abroad;” stems from a “disquieting” encounter he had while visiting family in the Dominican Republic that catalyzed his interest in different formations of “blackness” in the Dominican Republic, Haiti, and the United States. Johnson's comparative project situates issues of race within the domestic dynamics of the United States and the international aspects that contribute to the lives of Afro-Dominicans, Afro-Haitians, and Afro-Americans today. Johnson’s more recently work explores the emerging paradigm of “new blackness” which builds on his previous research interest in how representations of African American culture, race and class reinforce perceptions of difference within black communities. Johnson has instructed courses such as Ferguson and Beyond: Race, Police, and Protest in the Contemporary United States; and Interrupting Privilege: Race and Politics. Currently advised by Dr. Ralina Joseph, Johnson continues to expand his academic career through his collaborative work with the Center for Communication Difference and Equity as a PhD student in the University of Washington Seattle Communication Program.


Elba Moise is a doctoral candidate in Learning Sciences & Human development at the University of Washington and an Instructional Consultant at UW’s Center for Teaching and Learning. She is an active ensemble member and facilitator for Theater for Change Program and is currently a co-instructor for the course “Acting Up: Teaching Theater for Change”. Elba is also an active volunteer in the Dominican Republic facilitating community health, anti-racism and black empowerment workshops for Haitian and Dominican youth and teachers. Elba’s research and practitioner interests center on critical embodied learning and pedagogy, intersections of emotions and identity in teaching and learning, power dynamics in formal and informal learning spaces, and student success in higher education. Elba is a former McNair scholars and received a B.A. in Psychology from St. Edward's University as well as a Masters of Public Health from Oregon State University.


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Communications Building 126

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