Perspectives: Black Theologian Day 2022

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Perspectives: Black Theologian Day 2022

Connected through slavery, a Black woman and a white woman discover their past—and each other.

When and where

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Location

Strongsville United Methodist 13500 Royalton Road Strongsville, OH 44136

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About this event

Reaching Across the Racial Divide

Cousins Betty Kilby Baldwin and Phoebe Kilby will share their experiences of discovering they are connected through slavery and then embarking on a path toward reconciliation and reparation.

Their presentation will draw on lessons from their 2021 book, Cousins: Connected through slavery, A Black woman and a White woman discover their past – and each other. In alternating chapters, each woman tells her dramatic story – from Betty’s experience as one of the first Black children to attend her desegregated school, to Phoebe’s eventual question to Betty, “How do I begin to repair the harms?”

The cousins are living out a dream of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. that the children of former slaves and the children of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table in fellowship.

Perspectives: Black Theologian Day 2022 participants will hear about the working reparations project the cousins conceived together and learn from them ways to reach across the racial divide and work toward racial reconciliation in their personal lives, in their churches, and throughout their communities.

Registration is free BUT YOU MUST REGISTER BY FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30 so that we will know how many meals to prepare.

Childcare will be available at the church for the event, but adults will need to pick-up their children for the lunch break.

About the Perspectives: Black Theologian Day Speakers

Raised in Virginia with four siblings, Dr. Betty Kilby Fisher Baldwin was one of the first Black children to attend and graduate from Warren County High School. She began her employment as a factory worker and climbed the corporate ladder to achieve executive management employment. After she retired, she wrote and published her autobiography, Wit, Will & Walls.

Phoebe Kilby, a descendant of enslavers, grew up in Baltimore, Maryland, where she lived with her physician father, mother, and sister. Concerned about the morality and wisdom of war and having a growing interest in peace, she studied extensively at the Center for Justice and Peacebuilding at Eastern Mennonite University. She had a long career as an urban and environmental planner, working on contracts with local, state, and federal governments.

Kilby and Kilby Baldwin are both actively involved with Coming to the Table, a national movement of people “working together to create a just and truthful society that acknowledges and seeks to heal from the racial wounds of the past, from slavery and the many forms of racism it spawned.”

At the Perspectives: Black Theologian Day event there will be available for purchase a limited number of copies of their book, Cousins: Connected through slavery, A Black woman and a White woman discover their past – and each other. You may also purchase a copy online by clicking this link.

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