New Year's Japanese Sweets Making Workshop

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New Year's Japanese Sweets Making Workshop

Join SJA for a Wagashi (Japanese sweets) Making Workshop. Two hour-long sessions. Hurry, tickets sell fast!

When and where

Date and time

Location

First Presbyterian Arlington 601 North Vermont Street Arlington, VA 22203

Map and directions

How to get there

Refund Policy

Refunds up to 30 days before event
Eventbrite's fee is nonrefundable.

About this event

Beautiful to look at and delicious to eat, wagashi are traditional Japanese sweets that can be found in teahouses, cafes, and specialty stores all across Japan. Typically served alongside a cup of matcha to balance out the bitterness of the tea, they are an intrinsic part of Japanese culture and often closely linked to the seasons or local region. Join SJA for its Wagashi Making Workshop, led by Ms. Sachiko Tsunoda-Bedford, who will provide step-by-step instructions on how to create a seasonal wagashi. Please note, this event is for participants aged high school & up, no children. (Stay tuned for wagashi workshop for kids - sign up to receive upcoming events here.)

Workshop will be conducted in two groups, with identical content. Please be sure to purchase a ticket that corresponds with your desired time slot.

  • Group One: 2:00 - 3:00 pm
  • Group Two: 3:30 - 4:30 pm

Limited availability - purchase ticket today to reserve your spot! Tickets are $20 per person and will cover for wagashi materials and one serving of matcha.

FREE standing tickets are also available. Participants will be able to watch the lecture and observe wagashi being made. Tea will be available at a cost.

Questions? Email info@sjastudy.org

What will we make during the workshop?

During the one-hour workshop, you will make two kinds of Nerikiri wagashi, using colorful sweet bean dough kneaded with shiro-ann (sweet white lima bean paste) with gyuuhi (soft mochi) to make a Usagi (rabbit) for the year of the rabbit and a Ume (plum) first flower to bloom in the spring. At the end of the class, you can eat the wagashi with freshly made matcha tea or take the wagashi home.

Meet your instructor, Sachiko Tsunoda-Bedford!

Being away from Japan for a long time, Sachiko started looking for ways to connect with Japanese culture at a deeper level. Six years ago, after her first daughter was born, she decided to make wagashi, Japanese sweets, on her own. Ever since, she has been fascinated by the art of wagashi-making. Her dream is to spread the love and fun of making wagashi to the world.

Instagram: sachi_wagashi

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