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Neuroscience at Storrs 2018

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Thomas J. Dodd Research Center

Storrs, CT 06269

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Conference organized by

  • The UCONN Interdisciplinary Neuroscience
  • Program Steering Committee

with the support from

  • The UCONN OVPR Scholarship Facilitation Fund
  • Psychological Sciences
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Electrical and Computer Engineering
  • Pharmaceutical Sciences
  • Physiology and Neurobiology
  • The Connecticut Institute for the Brain and Cognitive Sciences

For info visit

https://neuroscience.uconn.edu/

https://neuroscienceatstorrs.eventbrite.com



Itinerary

DATA BLITZ

(Konover Auditorium, Dodd Center Building)

2:30-3:30pm: Data Blitz

KEYNOTE LECTURE

(Konover Auditorium, Dodd Center Building)

4:00-5:00pm: Kay Tye, Associate Professor, Brain & Cognitive Sciences, MIT

RECEPTION and POSTER SESSION

(Atrium, Bousfield Building)

5:30-7:00pm: Hosted by Psychological Sciences




KEYNOTE LECTURE

Kay Tye, Associate Professor

Brain & Cognitive Sciences, MIT

Title, “Neural Circuit Mechanisms of Valence Processing

Abstract:

How do our brains determine whether something is good or bad? How is this computational goal implemented in biological systems? Given the critical importance of valence processing for survival, the brain has evolved multiple strategies to solve this problem at different levels. The psychological concept of “emotional valence” is now beginning to find grounding in neuroscience. This review aims to bridge the gap between psychology and neuroscience on the topic of emotional valence processing. Here, I highlight a subset of studies that serve to illustrate each motif across multiple systems. The motifs I identify as being important in valence processing include: 1) Labeled lines, 2) Divergent Paths, 3) Opposing Components, and 4) Neuromodulatory Gain. Importantly, the functionality of neural substrates in valence processing is dynamic, context-dependent, and changing across short and long time scales due to synaptic plasticity, competing mechanisms, and homeostatic need.



POSTER PRESENTATIONS



@UConnGradSchool

@UConnCLAS

@UConnEngineer

@UConnPNB

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Thomas J. Dodd Research Center

Storrs, CT 06269

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