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NASW-VT 2017 Annual Conference

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Champlain College

375 Maple Street

Burlington, VT 05402

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Join us for the National Association of Social Workers-Vermont Chapter's Annual Conference at beautiful Champlain College. Co-sponsored by the Champlain College Social Work Department.

Our day will start with a keynote address from Vermont Attorney General T.J. Donovan, followed by a panel on Racial Justice-- Moving Forward Together: Conversations for Community Justice. For the afternoon, choose from dynamic workshops on clinical, advocacy, and social justice topics. Please view workshop desciptions below, as you will be asked to select your choices when you register.

This conference is fully catered. 6.5 CEUs, including 2 Ethics CEUs.

Donations toward NASW-VT's Sobel Scholarship will be gladly accepted at the registration table throughout the day. The Sobel Scholarship will be offered to a rising Junior BSW social work student who reflects Lara Sobel's ability to seek out the good no matter how overwhelming and negative the circumstances; never allow the misfortune of individuals or their level of despair to become routine or acceptable; and strengthen the cause of child welfare, social justice, and health and wellness of child welfare staff. The scholarship will consist of $1000, free NASW-VT membership, free admission to all NASW-VT events, and the assignment of a social worker mentor for one year.

NASW-VT 2017 Annual Conference Workshop Descriptions
Afternoon Session 1:
Connecting with Children through Stories (Sarah Rosenthal LICSW):
Stories help children make sense of their identity within their complex world. This experiential workshop will explore three ways to help children integrate their experience through stories: (1) use of picture books, (2) creating a personal narrative, and (3) joint comic strip writing. Get ready to be creative!

Mass Incarceration in Vermont & Engaging Alternatives (Suzi Wizowaty):
What does mass incarceration look like in VT? We have the 2nd oldest prison population in the U.S. and the highest rate of incarceration of black men; 50% of prisoners have serious mental health issues, 75% have substance abuse issues, and the women's population has grown at three times the rate of the men's. In this workshop we will provide additional background, explore common assumptions, and engage participants in conversations about the alternatives and the role of social workers, inside and outside the social service and criminal justice systems. Suzi Wizowaty is a former state legislator and the founder and director of Vermonters for Criminal Justice Reform, a non-profit dedicated to education and advocacy.

Women in Elected Office (Ruth Hardy):
Nationwide, only about 25% of elected officials at every level of government are women, and the United States ranks 104th in the world for gender parity among elected officials. Here in Vermont, we rank 33rd among the 50 states for gender parity. So while we have the second highest percentage of women in our state legislature, fewer than 25% of our municipal officials are women, and only one statewide elected officer is a woman. We're one of only two states to never send a woman to Congress. In fact, only 11 women in Vermont's history have ever been elected to statewide office. What is behind this poor showing for women in elected office in our country and state? Why is it important for women to be involved with electoral politics? And how can we get more women to run and win elected office? Ruth Hardy, the Executive Director Emerge Vermont, an organization that recruits and trains Democratic women to run for public office, will outline some of the barriers women face in this arena, and how efforts like Emerge and the power of individual women are working to ensure more gender balance in our local, state, and federal offices. Learn what you can do to help, and how YOU can run for public office for the benefit of your community and state.

Afternoon Session 2:
Trauma, Treatment and Recovery (Margaret Joyal, M.A.):
Everything is different in the face of serious psychological trauma. People’s brains function differently, behavioral treatments and traditional psychotherapeutic approaches often don’t work. Find out what works and why. Margaret Joyal, M.A. will present an overview of trauma, treatment and recovery. She will share the latest research on the physical effects of trauma on the brain and body as well as treatments that arise from this research. She will specifically look at a stage model of treatment as enacted within a team approach.

From the Settlement House to the State House (VT State Representative Brian Cina, LICSW)
As a profession, social work seeks to engage and empower people in making positive social change. The social worker in the Legislature practices social work skills in a variety of ways and on many levels.Individual, group, organizational, and community practice take on different manifestations as one deals with constituents, committees, caucuses, advocacy groups, movements, and the unique institutional culture of the government. As a legislator, the social worker influences laws and policies which determine the course of social structures and systems. From the legislative level, the social worker contributes to social change on a structural level that hopefully fosters social justice and human rights on all other levels of practice.

Keeping Children in Mind (Tory Rhodin LICSW):
As social workers who practice psychotherapy with children, how do we engage with kids in ways that are fun, effective, imaginative and mutually respectful: that honor the world(s) of children? In this workshop we will practice “keeping children in mind” through a variety of experiential and didactic exercises, reflecting on our own experiences as social workers and as humans who used to be children. We will also learn about the life and work of Janusz Korczak, a pediatrician and child advocate who entered with gravity and grace into the worlds of the children he cared for.

Working with Criminal Justice -Involved Survivors of Domestic & Sexual Violence (Kira Krier, LICSW & Kim Jordan, MA):
85%-95% of incarcerated women in Vermont have reported experiencing sexual and/or domestic violence, and prison itself can be traumatizing and triggering. This workshop will provide practical applications for trauma-informed practices, an awareness of pathways to incarceration - including human trafficking, and offer clinical support to those working with individuals involved in the criminal justice system.

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Champlain College

375 Maple Street

Burlington, VT 05402

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