$25 – $65

Muscogee Creek Indian Freedmen Band History and Genetics conference

Event Information

Share this event

Date and Time

Location

Location

Ronald J. Norick Downtown Library

300 Park Avenue

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73102

View Map

Refund Policy

Refund Policy

No Refunds

Event description

Description

The Muscogee Creek Indian Freedmen Band in collaboration with W. Montague Cobb Research Lab, Howard University and Avery Research Center, College of Charleston is pleased to announce its June 15, 2019 conference! The 2019 conference will be held at the Ronald J. Norick Downtown Library, 300 Park Avenue, Oklahoma City, OK, 73102, from 10:00 am-5: 00 pm. The Banquet will be held at Pearl’s Bricktown, 303 E. Sheridan Ave. Oklahoma City, OK, 73104 at 6:30 pm.

The 2019 conference has attracted scholarly presenters and speakers; presentations will focus on Creek Freedmen, Seminole Freedmen, and Gullah history. Topic of discussions will explore the intertwining histories, culture, relationships, and racial identity of Black Indians and Native Americans. Other significant activities are planned such as a genealogy workshop that will cover Creek and Seminole Freedmen history. Also, family research assistance will be provided to participants if needed. A planned panel discussion will include attorneys, historians, and the descendants of Creek and Seminole Freedmen.

Conference attendees are invited to participate in African Bloodlines an important project spearheaded by W. Montague Cobb Research Lab, Howard University and Ms. Caldwell. This project investigates ancestral, bio-cultural, and genetic linkages of chronic disease amongst African Americans and African American micro-ethnic groups. By combining relevant historical, anthropological, and genomic-based techniques in hopes to create a comprehensive analysis, particularly of cardiovascular disease, in the precision medicine era. African Bloodlines is the colloquial name for "Identifying Genetic and Bio-Cultural Linkages to Cardiovascular disease amongst African Americans." Ancestral and Health DNA testing will be provided to participants. Participation in this project is optional.

The 2019 conference has attracted an impressive cadre of speakers:


*Dr. Daniel F. Littlefield Jr., is the director of the Sequoyah Research Center at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. Littlefield holds a Ph.D. degree from Oklahoma State University. Noted Author of Africans and Seminoles: From Removal to Emancipation, Africans and Creeks: from the colonial period to the Civil War, and Seminole Burning, Chickasaw Freedmen, A people without a country, and Cherokee Freedmen.


*Dr. Joseph A. Opala, Noted historian for establishing the "Gullah Connection," the historical links between the indigenous people of the West African nation of Sierra Leone and the Gullah people of the Low Country region of South Carolina and Georgia in the United States. Opala's historical research began with a study of Bunce Island, the British slave castle in Sierra Leone that was a departure point for many African slaves shipped to South Carolina and Georgia in the mid- and late 18th century Middle Passage. He was the first scholar to recognize that Bunce Island has greater importance for the Gullah than any other West African slave castle. He ranks it as "the most important historic site in Africa for the United States. Opala also helped organize several reunions between the Gullahs and their Black Seminole cousins in Oklahoma, Texas, and Northern Mexico. The Black Seminoles are the descendants of Gullah slaves who escaped into Spanish Florida in the 1700s, where they allied with the Seminole Indians. After the Second Seminole War in the 1830s, the Black Seminoles were removed to Indian Territory (now Oklahoma). Some later migrated to Texas and Northern Mexico, where their descendants still retain Gullah language and customs to the present day. Opala organized a symposium at Penn Center that brought Black Seminole leaders to the Gullah region for the first time, and he helped organize return visits by Gullah leaders to Black Seminole communities in Oklahoma and Texas.


*Dr. Patricia Williams Lessane PhD. is a cultural anthropologist whose focus areas include Pan African religious identity, Black feminist theory, and representations of Black life in popular culture. She earned a BA in English from Fisk University, a MALS from Dartmouth College, and a PhD in Anthropology from University of Illinois at Chicago. Before joining The College of Charleston, she was a faculty member at Roosevelt University, and a consultant for The Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago.


*Dr. Lindsay Robertson -The University of Oklahoma - College of Law, Faculty Director, American Indian Law and Policy Center -Associate Director, Inter-American Center for Law and Culture. Professor Lindsay G. Robertson joined the law faculty at the University of Oklahoma in 1998 after serving as a visiting professor in 1997. He teaches courses in Federal Indian Law, Comparative Indigenous Peoples Law, Constitutional Law and Legal History and serves as Faculty Director of the OU Center for the Study of American Indian Law and Policy. Late June 2014 he will visit Mainz University for a ZIS-Guest professorship. Prior to coming to OU, Robertson taught Federal Indian Law at the University Of Virginia School Of Law and the George Washington University National Law Center. He was a Research and Visiting Fellow at the Philadelphia Center for Early American Studies from 1992 to 1994. He worked in private practice in Washington, DC, and Charlottesville, Virginia, and as a judicial clerk at the United States District Court for the District of Delaware. He currently serves as Special Justice on the Supreme Court of the Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribes.


*Dr. Fatimah L.C. Jackson received her PhD, MA, and BA (cum laude with Distinction in all subjects) from Cornell University. She has conducted research on, and is particularly interested in the study of human-plant coevolution, particularly the influence of phytochemicals on human metabolic effects and evolutionary processes and in population substructure in peoples of African descent. She is recognized for developing ethno genetic layering as a computational tool to identify human microethnic groups in complex heterogeneous populations and their differential expressions of health disparities. Trained as a human biologist, Dr. Jackson has published extensively in such journals as Human Biology, Biochemical Medicine and Metabolic Biology, the American Journal of Human Biology, and the Journal of the National Medical Association, among others. She won the Nick Norgan Award in 2009 for the Best Article Published in Annals of Human Biology, and in 2012 was the first recipient of the Ernest E. Just Prize in Medical and Public Health Research, Avery Research Institute, College of Charleston and Medical University of South Carolina (University of South Carolina). In 2012, she was also Coined by Rear Admiral Dr. Helena Mishoe, National Institutes of Health, NHLBI and US Public Health Service. Dr. Jackson has taught widely, mentored a large number of students, and is now Director of the W. Montague Cobb Research Laboratory at Howard University, the largest collection of African American skeletal and dental remains in the world (covering 400 years of African American biological history). In 2017 Howard University named her STEM Woman Researcher of the Year and she received the Outstanding Service Award from the Department of Biology, where she is a professor.


*Dr. Kareem Washington, PhD. Assistant Professor in the Department of Pediatrics and Child health, Division of Genetics & Human Genetics; Graduate school Chair of the Dept. of Genetics and Human Genetics Howard University and Director of Graduate studies, and Director of the MD/PhD medical school training program. Kareem received his Ph.D. from the Human Genetics program at Howard University. Completed a post-doctoral training as a fellow in the laboratory of molecular and clinical hematology (MCH), a branch of the National Institute of Digestive, Diabetes and Kidney disease.


*Damario Solomon Simmons, M. Ed., J.D. has a nationwide practice and has represented dozens of high profile clients and causes including advocating for reparations for the survivors of the 1921 Greenwood Massacre, citizenship rights of Black Descendants of Muscogee Creek Nation Freedmen.

Damario has overseen the negotiation of millions of dollars of professional athlete player and endorsement contracts, organized and managed athletes’ business, branding, and legal structures, and represented dozens of players regarding NFLPA, NCAA, and local high school rules and regulations, including five NFL or NBA first-round draft picks. He also has substantial experience advising and representing clients in relation to government and community relations, public policy campaigns, and political messaging.

He was the 2015 Oklahoma Bar Association's recipient of the Ada Lois Sipuel-Fisher Diversity Award, in 2016 the National Bar Association named him a top "40 under 40" lawyer, and was the 2017 Tulsa People Magazine Tulsan of the Year.



*Ms. Jennifer L. Caldwell is doctoral student in the Department of Genetics and Human and graduate researcher in the W. Montague Cobb Research, Howard University. She received two Bachelors of Science (cum laude) in Chemistry and Physics from the Sciences University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff in 2011 and 2012 respectively and is a Bill and Melinda Gates Millennium Scholar. She received a MPH Epidemiology from the University of Arkansas for Medical. Within the CRL, Jennifer’s research includes genetic and environmental interactions that influence CVD and Stroke in African American populations. The Gullah Geechee of the Coastal Sea Island are a prototype micro-ethnic group of African Americans, as they have a rich African heritage. Jennifer has specific interest in population genetics and epigenetic methods used for gene discovery and expansion of precision medicine research. A native of Pine Bluff, Arkansas, she loves all things southern, traveling, dance, and is a pseudo-chef.



.

Share with friends

Date and Time

Location

Ronald J. Norick Downtown Library

300 Park Avenue

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73102

View Map

Refund Policy

No Refunds

Save This Event

Event Saved