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Modelling Animal Locomotion - A Biologist's Journey (Talk & Workshop)

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Function Room

Henriette Raphael Building

Guy's Campus

London

SE1 1UL

United Kingdom

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You are invited to Researc/hers Code's computational modelling seminar and workshop on Wednesday 2nd May at King's College London, Guy's Campus. Our guest speaker will be Dr Monica Daley, Senior Lecturer in Locomotor Biomechanics at the Royal Veterinary College, London.

Monica will talk about her research in "Modelling Animal Locomotion with Dynamical Systems Theory" and will run a hands-on computing workshop for you to try out these computational models for yourselves!

Requirements:

A fully charged laptop with MATLAB (with license) installed in advance. Instead of installing, you can also use MATLAB Online, but you will also need a Mathworks account and a valid licence. If you cannot get a MATLAB license, please install Octave.

About Monica's Research and Interests:

Dr Monica Daley is a faculty member of the Structure and Motion Lab, where she leads research in Comparative Neuromechanics— A field that seeks to understand the interplay of morphology, mechanics and sensorimotor control that influences how animals move through their environment.

Daley’s research investigates how animals achieve robustly stable, economic and agile locomotion in complex terrain. This research is at the interface of muscle physiology, energetics, neural control, mechanics and bio-inspired robotics. We use an integrative approach that combines a range of experimental techniques in biomechanics and physiology with computer simulations and collaborative bio-inspired design and control of legged robots.

This research provides insight into natural animal behaviour, evolution of leg morphology, and injury mechanisms in domestic and wild species. Such insights can inform health and welfare issues including mobility throughout the lifespan, gait pathology, fall prevention, and rehabilitation.

Daley is also Mum to two boys, aged 7 and 3, who keep her balanced and inspire her to stay curious— the most essential element of being a scientist. Daley enjoys wheel thrown pottery in her limited spare time, making mostly mediocre mugs, but on a mission to someday make the perfect coffee mug.

Monica's Biography:

Daley earned her BSc degree in Biology at University of Utah in Salt Lake City, where she was inspired to pursue an academic career through her undergraduate research on human locomotor-ventilatory integration, mentored by Dennis Bramble and Dave Carrier. Daley then spent a year as a research technician in Franz Goller’s lab, investigating motor control of singing in zebra finches. These experiences initiated a long-standing fascination with the interplay of mechanics and neural control.

Daley went on to Harvard University, where she earned her MA and PhD in Organismic and Evolutionary Biology. Her research on muscle-tendon dynamics and biomechanics of avian bipedal locomotion was supported by a prestigious Predoctoral Fellowship award from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and supervised by Andrew Biewener at the Concord Field Station of Harvard University.

After completing her PhD, Daley was awarded a Research Fellowship by the U.S. National Science Foundation to develop models of the dynamics and control of bipedal locomotion, working with Dan Ferris in the Human Neuromechanics Lab at University of Michigan, in collaboration with Auke Ijspeert in the Biologically Inspired Robotics Group at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne. Daley joined the faculty of the Structure and Motion Lab at the Royal Veterinary College in 2008.

Schedule:

5:30-6:00pm - Registration

6:00-6:45pm - Talk by Dr Monica Daley

6:45-7:30pm - Workshop

7:30-8:00pm - Close and socialising with food and drinks

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Date and Time

Location

Function Room

Henriette Raphael Building

Guy's Campus

London

SE1 1UL

United Kingdom

View Map

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