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MEMHCA's Annual Conference 2019: Celebrate Experience!

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Location

Senator Inn and Spa

284 Western Avenue

Augusta, ME 04033

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Refund Policy

Refund Policy

Refunds up to 7 days before event

Eventbrite's fee is nonrefundable.

Event description

Description

Join us for a full day exploration of different aspects of the themes of experience as therapists and humans. 6 contact hours will be awarded.

Agenda

8:30 – 9:00 : Registration, Welcome, Introductions

9:00 – 10:00 : Keynote Discussion on History and Future Goals for LCPC Licensure

10:00 – 12:00 : Morning Workshop (3 options)

A) Creative Pathways to Resilience: Restorative Interventions For Supporting Individuals, Children and Families Bereaved by Suicide – Christine Linnehan LCPC, BC-DMT, FT

The path of grief after suicide can be uniquely challenging and complicated for those left behind. Suicide loss puts the bereaved at a higher risk for developing a combination of trauma and grief distress that can interfere with the natural bereavement process. They often feel shattered and at a loss as to how restore their resilience and wellbeing.

In this interactive session, case examples and experiential exercises will be used to explore a restorative, trauma-informed approach to supporting individuals, children, and families as they navigate the rocky terrain of grief after suicide. Prominent themes of suicide bereavement and the impact of stigma on the grieving process will be addressed. We will look at creative interventions and mind/body strategies that aim to help the bereaved cope with the interplay of trauma and grief reactions; process their stories of loss; and envision a path toward healing and hope.

Objectives:

1. Describe 4 ways that the distinctive nature of suicide impacts bereavement.

2. List he various types of stigma and the barriers stigma creates to the grieving process.

3. Demonstrate at least 2 mind/body strategies for decreasing trauma reactions and promoting self-regulation.

4. Share an example of how movement, music, and storytelling can help the bereaved of all ages cope with stigma and shame in the aftermath of suicide.

Bio:

Christine Linnehan, M.S., LCPC, BC-DMT, FT is a licensed clinical professional counselor. She maintains a private practice in Scarborough, ME. For over 20 years she has specialized in work with grieving children, adolescents, adults, and families. She has been a clinical consultant in the Bereavement Services Program at the Center for Grieving Children since 2004. Previously, she worked in inpatient and partial hospitalization trauma treatment programs. Drawing from her training as a board-certified dance/movement therapist, she utilizes mind/body strategies in her clinical work designed to promote resilience and wellbeing.

Christine is certified as a Fellow of Thanatology from the Association of Death Education and Counseling and is trained in EMDR from the EMDR International Association (EMDRIA). She has received training in Family Therapy at the Family Institute of Cambridge and in Couples Therapy at the Gottman Institute (Level 2). She completed the Suicide Bereavement Clinician Training sponsored by the American Association of Suicidology and the American Foundation of Suicide Prevention (AFSP). She is active in AFSP Maine and is a facilitator for their annual International Survivors of Suicide Loss Day.

Christine has a special interest in the impact of suicide loss on children and families. She enjoys writing, consulting, and presenting nationally on creative, restorative approaches to healing.


B) Ethical Implications in Clinical Practice - Alexander Katopis LCPC, CADC, NCC, MHRT-C

This workshop is designed to discuss ethical implications within a counseling professional framework. During the workshop, various types of ethical perspectives will be discussed, as well as best practices, common pitfalls, and clinical dilemmas which can lead to transference/countertransference issues, poor boundaries, and other ethical/legal violations. Also, specific strategies and approaches that counseling professionals can proactively implement, including steps to take when potential ethical violations have occurred.

Objectives:

1. Define clinical boundaries.

2. Recognize risks that lead to ethical dilemmas.

3. Use the code of ethics as a daily practice.


Bio:

Alexander Katopis earned his Bachelor's in Social and Behavioral Sciences and Master's of Science in Clinical Mental Health Counseling at the University of Southern Maine (USM). He is an LCPC (Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor) and has studied, trained and specialized in working with individuals, couples, and families. Alexander has had a variety of exposure to different setting and roles in the mental health arena, working as a clinician, clinical supervisor, regional director, clinical director, and is currently faculty at USM in the Counselor Education Program.


C) The Experience of Addiction - David Doreau LCPC, NCC

Humanistic psychology represents the idea that the human being is more than the sum of the biological, psychological and social forces at work on the person. It is not enough to understand the empirically observable events that impact the person even though that account may be complete. Humanism maintains there is something more, unique to humans, present in every single one, and constituting the ineffable spark of our kind. The tool that psychology has developed to reflect this truth is phenomenology, best represented in the area of therapy by the work of Carl Rogers. Rogers maintained that the self-actualization of our human potential is blocked by conditions of worth. These conditions of worth can be ameliorated by the phenomenological attempt to understand the experience of the other through the use of active listening, unconditional positive regard and mirroring of the other’s lived experience that finally feels to the other to be authentic and accurate. When this happens, the person is able to resume the journey of actualization that will develop their unique human potential. Finally, this work is seen as good not only for the person but for the world in which they live which benefits from every human becoming all that they can be. One application of this model is that addiction is the expression of human beings struggling the best they can with problems in living and being trapped by conditions of worth that prevent progress towards actualization. This application does not deny or contradict biological, psychological. Or social factors that contribute to addiction. Rather it emphasizes the lived experience of the person and how people undergoing that experience can recover the ability to think the best of themselves and continue the movement towards actualization of their potential. All of us as practitioners must learn to enter the world of those we are trying to help without judgement or preconception of what will help them. We must simply listen and affirm until they are able to see for themselves what they need. This way of interacting with people seeking help is partially captured in Motivational Interviewing which tries to nudge people in the direction of desirable change, while respecting their need to see the necessity for themselves. The dirty little secret of MI is that it is a thoroughly judgmental process which assumes that the Interviewer ultimately knows what is best (e.g. to stop smoking or get on Suboxone or abstain from or cut back on use). What would happen if we truly trusted the process and the person’s ability finally to choose what is best for themselves once they have gotten the gift of active listening with unconditional positive regard? What would happen if the helper’s task with addictions was simply to work with the helpee to achieve the kind of self-acceptance and self-worth that would see a resumption of that person’s journey towards their own unique and incomparable self-actualization? This workshop is asking addiction practitioners to make this process the foundation of their work. The tool that the workshop will use is to ask all practitioners to experience addiction first hand through what happens in our interactions today, through our previous social and personal history, and through our ongoing interactions with people who ask for our help. Though this tool is the foundation for helping, it is consistent with the use of other tools such as MAT, relapse prevention, treatment for trauma, public health and legislative changes that lessen the incidence and impact of addiction and any other relevant intervention.

Objectives:

1. Motivate practitioners to make active listening the first step in any treatment contract.

2. Help practitioners to understand how conditions of worth help to create and maintain addiction.

3. Help practitioners to understand how to give unconditional positive regard to clients who engage in behaviors that distress or offend.

4. Help practitioners to be non-directive in a way that encourages client direction and choice to ask for tools to make changes.

5. Help practitioners to discern black and white “either/or” thinking in addictions work and to learn to practice “both/and” thinking.

Bio:

Dave is a semi-retired Dual Diagnosis Counselor. He has had his own issues with alcohol and panic disorder and that taught him the importance of helpers who try to see and hear the client’s story as experienced by the client. Dave has lived and worked in Maine since 1987 and loves his four grandchildren, gardening and the outdoors life that is possible in Maine. He continues to keep his hand in the game by working per diem for the MaineGeneral Intensive Outpatient Program in Waterville and Augusta. As a recovering person, Dave sees the opiate crisis as just another chapter in the ongoing story of addiction as a part of the human experience. His perspective is that we are being challenged as humans to own all the troubles that have afflicted humankind throughout the centuries and to affirm that we are all in this together and that we will recover (or not) as we join hands and hearts in facing the problem.

12:00 - 1:00 : Lunch

1:00 - 2:30 : First Afternoon Workshop (3 options)

A) The Circle Way: Creating Meaningful Dialogue Where Everyone Has a Voice - Amy Tice LCPC, M.A. Ed.S

This workshop is based on the teachings from the book The Circle Way: A Leader in Every Chair by Christina Baldwin and Ann Linnea of PeerSpirit, Inc. The Circle Way is a form of dialogue, inspired by Native American councils and other ancient traditions of circle among indigenous people, in which humans have gathered for respectful conversations for thousands of years. Circle is an experience of sharing story, inviting diverse thinking, and encouraging creative problem solving. Circle provides a foundation and the tools for collaboration and meaningful conversation. The Circle Way is a circle-based methodology for meeting in groups so that every voice is heard and information and stories are shared in a conscious way. The process includes so many of the things that I believe to be critical for effectiveness as we communicate, teach, mediate, form relationships, find solutions, develop ideas, build bridges, etc.

Objectives:

1. Stories we share in Circle are confidential.

2. We listen with compassion and curiosity.

3. From time to time we agree to pause to re-gather our thoughts or focus.

4. We ask each other for what we need and offer what we can.

Bio:

I earned my Master of Arts and Educational Specialist degrees in Community Counseling from James Madison University in Harrisonburg, VA and I am a Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor in the State of Maine. Throughout my education, I worked to integrate my development as a counselor with my interest in wilderness and experiential therapy. I firmly believe, and research has proven, that the wilderness naturally teaches us about actions and consequences and stimulates change, while also promoting healing and personal growth. In addition to the natural lessons of the wilderness, I have years of experience using structured experiential therapy activities with the young people I have served, as well as with their families. My clinical experience includes providing individual, group, and family mental health and substance abuse counseling and experiential treatment to adolescents and young adults in homes, hospitals, residential treatment, schools, and the wilderness of Alaska, Virginia and Maine. I approach my clinical work from a client-centered, strengths-based ideology. By far the best part of each of my counseling jobs has been interacting with the young people and families that I serve. I grow with and learn from them every day and the relationships that I have formed leave a lasting impact. In addition to my work as a counselor, I am also currently employed at Unity College, serving as an adjunct instructor for the last two years, teaching several sections of Composition and Communication I, Introduction to Psychology and Abnormal Psychology.


B) The Clinical Significance and Power of Embracing the Sacred Feminine - Lois LeBlanc LCPC, CPT

During the Bronze Age (3700-500BC) the prevailing belief about the divine began and continues to be that God is male. The divine is He. Prior to this and during the beginning of the neolithic period it is believed that this was not the case. Instead, it is believed that this period was characterized by a deep reverence for the sacred feminine as mother, as nurturer and creator of life. It was a time when women were often the healers. There was profound reverence for the earth. It is also believed that at this time there existed a cooperative relationship between men and women, with neither gender determining a hierarchy.

In this workshop we will examine the impact of this enduring shift on our personal and collective psyches, on most of our modern cultures’ view of the earth as a gift from God the Father for us to exploit, on our cultural values and limited scientific beliefs as well as our beliefs about ourselves with a view toward the necessity of a more gender balanced paradigm which embraces and reintegrates the feminine, the intuitive and the transpersonal into the sacred.

Objectives:

1.To more fully recognize how we have internalized a value system that demeans and objectifies the feminine and the impact of this on both males and female.

2. To more fully embrace an understanding and valuing of the embodiment of the sacred feminine and its healing capacity, to ourselves, to our clients as well as to our culture and our planet.

3. To explore and embrace the beauty and joy embedded in the healing process where the marriage of the sacred feminine and the sacred masculine is the source of infinite creativity.

4. To explore the strategies that are useful and essential to this emerging paradigm.


Bio:

Lois LeBlanc has worked as a psychotherapist in agencies and/or private practice for 18 years. She currently works privately in Lovell, ME. She is Past President of MEMHCA. Her background and eclectic approach is informed by her training and interest in depth psychology and polarity therapy. She also draws on this orientation and shares her knowledge and experience in workshops and trainings. Lois is one third owner of Wisdom Journeys, LLC, wisdomjourneys207.com, which offers travel and educational experiences locally and internationally.


C) Yoga Workshop - John Yasenchak LCPC, Ed.D

Yoga is an ancient method for nourishing mental health that has become increasingly popular in the helping professions. In the West, most are familiar with various postures (asana) and breathing practices (pranayam) that support relaxation, grounding, focus, and a sense of equanimity. The holistic healing benefits of these practices are well known. In addition to these familiar practices there is also find a wealth of information in the ancient literature of India that offers insight into the process of healing and recovery on every level of our existence. This workshop will provide an experience of both the "yoga of action" and an introduction to some of the ancient teachings. We will explore some yoga techniques (gentle movement, easy posture, breath), and discuss how the practice relates to personal growth and healing. Particular attention will be paid to techniques that focus on grounding, anxiety, mild depression. We will also hear verses from the Yoga Sutra of Patanjali (an ancient CBT manual) and the Bhagavadgita (a most sacred text) and explore their relation to the practice of counseling. Through practice, self-study, and surrender of the false ego (Yoga sutra II:I), yoga instills a peace that transcends problems of living. A goal of this workshop will be to taste just a little of what yoga has to offer. Please be prepared for gentle movement and, if you like, bring your mat.

Objectives:

1. Participants will increase knowledge of yoga philosophy as it relates to the practice of counseling.

2. Participants will experience and practice yogic techniques that can be used for working with trauma, anxiety, and mild depression.

3. Participant will experience and understand the holistic approach that yoga offers for counselor self-care.


Bio:

John Yasenchak, Ed.D., is a licensed clinical counselor, licensed substance abuse counselor, certified clinical supervisor, and a counselor educator. He taught in the graduate counseling program at the University of Maine and was Associate Professor at Husson University for the past eight years. For twenty years prior to arriving at Husson, John was clinical supervisor for the Penobscot Indian Nation Counseling Services. John completed his doctorate in counselor education at the University of Maine, and also holds a master’s degree in philosophy from Fordham University and masters in counseling psychology from Slipper Rock State University. He taught philosophy at Loyola University in Baltimore for several years and trained in both pastoral ministry and theology. John began a study of yoga in the early 1980’s, and has taught both classes and workshops for many years. He has a special interest the ancient yoga literature and language. John has served of various boards, including the Co-Occurring Collaborative Serving Maine. John is Past- President of the Maine Counseling Association and Chair for the North Atlantic Region of the American Counseling Association. He has been a member of both ACA and AMCHA and is currently on the editorial board of Counseling and Values. He recently traveled to India with several members of ACA where he was inspired by counseling students at Indian universities and colleges.


2:30 - 4:00 - Second Afternoon Workshop (2 options)

A) Discovering the Body in Therapy - David Jordan LCPC, CCS

In this experiential workshop, we will explore the place of "body language," breath, energy and movement in the therapy process, as developed in bioenergetics and other body psychotherapies. We will go through a set of exercises working all points of the body, releasing tension & developing a free flow of energy in the body; we then do some bioenergetic breath work which promotes releases on physical and emotional levels. As we do so, I will relate the exercises to the theory of bioenergetics and the practice of body focused psychotherapy. We will at how energy flow or lack of can indicate blockages that relate to psychological issues. Bioenergetics, developed by Alexander Lowen, emphasizes the release of chronic physical and emotional tension through breathing, physical positions, movement, and sound, as well as traditional therapeutic methods.

Objectives:

1. A basic model of including the body in the therapy process.

2. Some blocks and issues in the body and in therapy.

3. Bio-energetic exercises and experiences in working with breath.

Bio:

David Jordan is a Certified Bioenergetic Therapist, and Clinical Counselor teaches bioenergetics, mindfulness and hypnosis as ways of learning to give oneself to each moment to experience our life in its fullness. His professional background includes supervising the Intensive Outpatient Program at Mercy Recovery Center, owning his own training, consultation, and counseling business, and supervising psychiatric and detoxification units for a community mental health center. He also is a published poet, co-founder of a cooperative Montessori school, and founder and past abbot of the Cypress Tree Zen Center. He has studied with therapists trained in Gestalt, bioenergetics, hypnosis and psychodrama. and with teachers of zen, tai-chi and qi gong. Since 1980, he has provided training on group leadership and team building, stress management , creativity, body-mind methods and the psycho-spiritual process for a variety of organizations, including York Hospital, Tri-County Mental Health Services, the Florida Alcohol and Drug Abuse Association Annual Conferences, the University of Southern Maine, the Florida Department of Corrections, the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, and DISC Village. He has also been a consultant on addictions with Capital Health Plan and Twelve Oaks of Pensacola.


B) Art Therapy with Essential Oils: Expanding the Senses - Jennifer Greiner LCPC, ATR

Clients often find themselves having a difficult time voicing and moving beyond their struggles with traditional talk therapy. Art Therapy serves to integrate the right brain and left brain processes, and move past these intellectual-emotional blocks. Essential Oils can help with the physical body as well as the emotional mind. To incorporate essential oils into Art Therapy techniques, we will first create Aromatherapy Play-doh. We will then use a variety of paints with essential oils to recall memories from the scents and create an image of the memory. These techniques can be used in a variety of settings with multiple populations. Smell is the fastest way to the brain. The aromatic molecules of essential oils have direct access to the limbic area where they can connect to our emotions. Participants will learn the basics of essential oils and how they relate to the emotional mind. They will engage in a directive to integrate essential oils into an art experientials of play-doh and depicting a memory recalled from smell with provided materials. Participants will learn how to assist clients using this specialized technique.

Objectives:

1. Integration of Art Therapy and Essential Oils for a unique, whole body experience.

2. Appreciation of how our sense of smell is connected to memories and can connect to the subconscious to provide nonverbal access to this information.

3. Learning from one's own experiences of Art therapy and Essential Oils as to how it could be integrated into a variety of practice settings. The process can be done individually but is most powerful in groups as this builds and nurtures community.

Bio:

Jennifer Greiner is a Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor (LCPC) and a Registered Art Therapist (ATR). She has a private practice in Biddeford, Maine and is the owner of Green Thinking. She brings to her practice extensive training in many expressive modalities and a history of working with diverse populations. She presents classes & workshops for the community and trainings on Essential Oils. In her practice, she incorporates essential oils into her therapeutic work.

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Date and Time

Location

Senator Inn and Spa

284 Western Avenue

Augusta, ME 04033

View Map

Refund Policy

Refunds up to 7 days before event

Eventbrite's fee is nonrefundable.

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