Mannes Sounds Festival: a Tribute to Zdeněk Fibich

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Mannes Sounds Festival: a Tribute to Zdeněk Fibich

Czech Center New York and Mannes Sounds Festival are proud to present a tribute to Zdeněk Fibich (1850-1900).

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Bohemian National Hall 321 East 73rd Street New York, NY 10021

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About this event

  • 3 hours
  • Mobile eTicket

Czech Center New York and Mannes Sounds Festival are proud to present a tribute to Zdeněk Fibich (1850-1900). The program will be presented by the young artists of Mannes and The School of Drama of the College of Performing Arts of The New School.

Fibich’s mother was German Viennese and he grew up bi-cultural. His music, very romantic by nature, reflects the strong bond between Czech and larger European style. Along with Bedřich Smetana and Antonín Dvořák, he was the most prominent Czech composer of the second half of the 19th century. His importance goes beyond the borders of the Czech culture.

The program of the event will be presented by the young artists of Mannes and The School of Drama of the College of Performing Arts of The New School, and features emblematic works by Zdeněk Fibich: a selection of piano pieces, songs and arias, the Quintet for clarinet, violin, cello, horn and piano, in D major op.42, and the melodrama for piano and narration “ The Water Goblin” on the text by Karel Jaromír Erben.

Mannes Sounds Festival: a Tribute to Zdeněk Fibich image

Zdeněk Fibich. Photo courtesy of Czech Museum of Music - National Museum

Czech composer Zdeněk Fibich was born in Všebořice, Bohemia, on December 21, 1850 and died in Prague on October 15, 1900. After Smetana and Dvořák, he was the most prominent Czech composer of the second half of the 19th century, notably of operas and orchestral and piano music. His concert and stage melodramas were some of the most ambitious and effective ever written and prompted other Czech composers to write in the same genre, thus creating a sizable and unique repertory for Czech music. Among his compositional strengths were lucid portrayals of the dramatic, particularly apparent in the symphonic poems and concert overtures, a command of miniature forms reminiscent of Schumann and a gift for producing effective melodic lines that range from the straightforward and aggressive to the strikingly poignant.

From Grove Music Online by John Tyrrell​.