$100 – $200

Make Your Own Ghost Heart

Event Information

Share this event

Date and Time

Location

Location

Genspace

132 32nd Street

#Suite 108

Brooklyn, NY 11232

View Map

Refund Policy

Refund Policy

No Refunds

Event description

Description

The workshop takes place over two sessions:

Saturday, November 10th from 1:00 PM to 5:00 PM

Sunday, November 11th from 11:30 AM to 2:00 PM

Join Genspace for a two-day, hands-on tissue engineering workshop to create “ghost heart” from a pig heart. You will have a chance to handle a real heart and learn how it works.

In this workshop, we will be using decellularization, which is tissue engineering technique to strip all the cells from a donor organ leaving behind nothing but a scaffold of connective tissue called a “ghost organ” named for its pale and ghostly appearance. In the near future, it may be possible to reseed this “ghost organ” with the patient’s own cells to regenerate an organ for transplantation. For this event, we will focus particularly on creating a “ghost heart”.

In this workshop you will:

  • Learn how the heart works.
  • Understand the molecular structure of the heart muscle.
  • Handle a real pig heart and discover its gross anatomy.
  • Patch up a pig heart and pump it with various chemicals to strip off its cells to make a “ghost heart”.
  • Hear about advances in cardiac tissue engineering.

This lengthy protocol will be divided into two sessions that will be composed of lectures and hands-on activity. Participants will work in pairs to create the “ghost hearts” and will be able to take home half of a heart, preserved in a jar, at the end of the workshop.

Note that this workshop involves handling raw pig hearts. No prior experience is necessary. Don’t forget your camera for plenty of mad science photo opportunities!

Sumeyye Yar is a scientist, science educator, maker, and do-it-yourself biology supporter. She received a Ph.D. in Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics and worked for three years as a post-doctoral researcher at Northwestern University. Her scientific research expertise is in cardiac muscle biochemistry and cardiometabolic diseases. She has published in numerous scientific journals and conference proceedings. She was also the recipient of several prestigious grants and fellowships, including American Heart Association pre- and post-doctoral fellowships. After completing her post-doctoral studies, she moved to the Netherlands where she taught introductory biotech classes at Waag society’s community laboratory. While teaching at the Waag, she also learned how to use 3D design and fabrication tools to build open source laboratory hardware. She reinvented, as part of her personal project, a 3D printable camera lucida microscope adaptor that converts a regular microscope to a drawing microscope. She has recently moved to NYC and started teaching at Genspace while at the same time partaking in outreach educational activities of BioBus. She is also currently collaborating with a New York-based artist on a BioArt project to grow in vitro meat in a dish.

Jen Liu is a New York-based visual artist working in video, performance, and painting, on topics of national identity, economy, and the re-motivating of archival artifacts. She is a 2017 recipient of the Guggenheim Fellowship in Film/Video, as well as the NYSCA/NYFA Fellowship in Digital/Electronic Art. She has presented work at The Whitney Museum, The New Museum, and Issue Project Room, New York; Royal Academy and ICA in London; Kunsthaus Zurich; Kunsthalle Wien and das weisse haus, Vienna; the Aspen Museum of Art; Henry Art Gallery, Seattle; MUSAC, Leon; as well as the 2014 Shanghai Biennale (China) and the Coreana Museum in Seoul, Korea. She has also received multiple grants and residencies, including Akademie Schloss Solitude, Stuttgart, Germany; Sommerakademie, Bern, Switzerland; de ateliers, Amsterdam, NL; the Pollock-Krasner Foundation, New York; among others. In 2017 she was a resident artist at Tulsa Artist Fellowship in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and in 2018 she will be a Swatch Artist in Residence in Shanghai, China, and Pioneer Works Visual Arts resident in Brooklyn, NY.


Miranda Gray is a scientist, educator, and an avid supporter of making science accessible to communities. She received her Master's in Genetics from Kansas State University Plant Pathology department and published research on the genetic variation of prairie grasses and its implications for tallgrass prairie conservation in the USA Midwest. During her Master's Miranda worked closely with K-12 teachers in the National Science Foundation GK-12 Program to share her prairie grass research with their classrooms and help design inquiry-based lessons. In addition to teaching microbiology courses, Miranda was a Researcher and Laboratory Manager for four years at Cornell University's Ecology & Evolutionary Biology department where she pursued projects from the biodiversity of frogs in South America to the population genomics of freshwater insects in montane landscapes. Since moving to NYC in 2017, Miranda worked with BioBus and the Variety Boys & Girls Club of Queens to bring Urban Ecology curriculum to elementary and middle school students in afterschool programs while taking advantage of the research-grade microscopes available on board the BioBus mobile laboratory. She currently works as the Science and Professional Learning Educator at the Queens Botanical Garden on Main Street in Flushing where she provides support to NYC teachers in the Urban Advantage program. Her personal loves are (no surpise) plants, rats, abstract art, and watching her nephews grow.

Share with friends

Date and Time

Location

Genspace

132 32nd Street

#Suite 108

Brooklyn, NY 11232

View Map

Refund Policy

No Refunds

Save This Event

Event Saved