LWEA Equity 4 All Conference

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Registration for the LWEA Equity for All Conference has closed. If you have questions contact Terri Neely, tneely@washingtonea.org

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International Community School

11133 Northeast 65th Street

Kirkland, WA 98033

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Sales Have Ended

Registrations are closed
Registration for the LWEA Equity for All Conference has closed. If you have questions contact Terri Neely, tneely@washingtonea.org
Event description
Developing student-focused strategies to close the achievement gap and increase student academic success.

About this Event

Participants will engage in meaningful learning opportunities and examine practices in schools and classrooms for the purpose of developing student-focused strategies to close the achievement gap and increase student academic success. Examples of 2019 LWEA Equity for All Conference topics include the following: Understanding the Diverse Cultures of our Community, Institutional Racism and Implicit Bias; Developing Culturally Responsive Strategies for the Classroom; Techniques for Infusing Restorative Justice Practices into the Classroom; and Ways to Meet the Needs of All Learners.

Agenda for the Day:

8:00am-8:40am Breakfast and Registration

8:40am-9:15am Welcome and Kick-Off

9:20am-10:50am Session 1

11:00am-12:30pm Session 2

12:30pm-1:50pm Lunch and Keynote Speaker

2:00pm-3:30pm Session 3

Session Title and Description - When registering you will select 1 class from each Session. Note - if you elect a session that is 4.5 hours, this is an all day sessions.

Creating a Culturally Responsive Classroom Part 1 & 2 (4.5 hours)* This is an all day class - Sessions 1-3 Key components of culturally responsive teaching for the purpose of enhancing student learning include teacher caring, teacher attitudes and expectations, formal and informal multicultural curriculum, culturally informed classroom/student discourse, and cultural congruity in teaching and learning strategies.

SESSION 1

Developing Cross-Cultural Competencies (1.5 hours)* Cross-cultural competence is a set of beliefs and behaviors in which one acknowledges and accepts one’s cultural identity as well as the cultural identity of those at work and in the community. Focused on increasing student achievement, participants will learn that it is an ongoing process of valuing differences through beliefs, actions and their outcomes. Starting with a "no fault; no blame" approach, this training begins at the self-awareness phase. It goes beyond traditional and historical cultural awareness trainings.

High Expectation Instruction for All Students (1.5 hours) Teachers will learn how their verbal behaviors and instructional strategies can support all students to achieve at high levels. Teachers will analyze the relationship between teacher expectations and student growth, reflecting on their own expectations of students and identifying how high expectations can positively impact student learning. Participants will have opportunities to consider their interactions with students and learn how to respond in ways that build student confidence in their ability to improve. Teachers will also explore strategies to engender effective effort and student agency. Reading selections and activities from Teaching Tolerance (https://www.tolerance.org), High Expectations Teaching (Saphier), and Culturally Responsive Teaching and the Brain (Hammond) will be referenced in the learning.

Taking a Stand: Creating a Safe School for LGBTQ students (1.5 hours) This introductory workshop uses video clips and hands on activities to examine the obvious and subtle ways bias plays out in schools and offers resources for creating schools that are safe for all students, regardless of their sexual orientation and gender identity. Designed for all school employees and focused on increasing student engagement and achievement.

Trauma Sensitive Classrooms: A look at ways to provide support for our most vulnerable students (1.5 hours) Through conversations and guided readings we will look at the impacts of trauma on our students and strategies for meeting their needs in our classrooms in order to increase their success and learning. By focusing on what makes a student resilient we hope to be able to structure our learning environments so that all students can achieve.

SESSION 2

Do We Have What We Need? Mapping the Equity Ecosystem (1.5 hours) Using the Equity Ecosystem model designed by Debbie Lacy as a framework for assessing a group or organization’s capacity to advance its equity goals. Participants will review the 7 components required for success. Participants will engage in conversation and a brief exercise to map their own Equity Ecosystems and look at how these systems can be enhanced to improve student success. We will also look at how to identify the strengths and gaps in your system along with how to fill those gaps and how to keep thinking systemically to ensure success.

Implicit Bias: Impacts on our students, colleagues and the world around us (1.5 hours) Through the lens of increasing student success, this research-based course for educators explores issues of implicit bias based upon race, ethnicity and LGBTQ status through an analysis of “microaggressions” and “micro-insults.” Participants will explore issues of implicit bias and microaggressions, develop an understanding of [1] how one's beliefs, values, and experiences inform one’s implicit biases and [2] how one's implicit biases and behaviors impact others (students, colleagues, families, etc.), and [3] learn about additional implicit bias resources for educators.

Social Justice in STEM class (1.5 hours) “Why is social justice necessary in STEM?” Participants will explore opportunities associated with STEM education for social justice to enhance their students' academic success. Participants will share their strategies they implement with students to explore racism and implicit bias through physics and systemic sexism in chemistry as a jumping-off point for further discussion. Attendees can expect to gain clearer motivation, tools for overcoming challenges, ideas to try in their own educational settings, and a network of educators with whom to continue this work. Bring your laptops! There will also be time to try out a modular curriculum created by the Under-representation Curriculum Project.

Using Restorative Justice Practices in Education* (1.5 hours) Though this course, participants gain an understanding of restorative justice practices that can improve educational outcomes for students. Restorative justice, which is based on respect, responsibility, relationship-building and relationship-repairing, focuses on mediation and agreement rather than punishment. Using restorative justice practices, educators can help keep students in school and create a safe environment where learning can flourish.

SESSION 3

Primer for Anti-Racist, White Educators (1.5 hours) The movement for racial justice and equity is not a new phenomenon, but it is becoming a larger part of the national conversation in education. Many white educators are seeking to be involved in racial justice work and to be more racially conscious but are hesitant and unsure of where to begin or how to do the work. This primer is the collected lessons learned by two white educators as they have engaged in racial equity work over the years. It covers how to do the work, and what to be aware of as you engaged in the work that has been, and is, led by educators of color.

Social Justice in Action (1.5 hours) Social justice refers to a concept in which equity or justice is achieved in every aspect of society rather than in only some aspects or for some people. A world organized around social justice principles affords individuals and groups fair treatment as well as an impartial share or distribution of the advantages and disadvantages within a society. Participants will advocate for education professionals and to unite educators to fulfill the promise of public education to prepare every student to succeed in a diverse and interdependent world.

Student Behavior: Precipitating Factors and Rational Detachment (1.5 hours) A student that acts out is often trying to tell us something. The precipitating factors require us as educators to find a rational detachment in order to separate the actions from the outcomes and help students ultimately manage their behaviors to find success. In this session participants will gain an understanding of why some students misbehave and strategies for learning more about the triggers in an effort to develop strategies that will improve student success and learning.

Walking the Talk: Classroom Strategies for Addressing LGBTQ Bias (1.5 hours) Designed for K-12 classroom instructors, this action-oriented workshop examines various approaches to designing and integrating lessons and activities that raise awareness of bias and empower students to advocate for change, especially around LGBTQ-related bias while increasing student success.

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International Community School

11133 Northeast 65th Street

Kirkland, WA 98033

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