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Jenny Eddy Conference Room

Thomas C. Pleger Science Building, UW Baraboo/Sauk County Campus

1006 Connie Rd.

Baraboo, WI

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Walking research-creation with diverse publics
a lecture by Stephanie Springgay

Feminist scholars argue that we need research practices that break with ableist, racist, extractive, and settler colonial logics, and instead focus on ones that are situated, relational, and ethical. This means troubling our relationship with institutions and transforming the kinds of value we allow for particular forms of knowledge. We need to alter our practices from ones based on extraction of data or as a means to correct a wrong. As such researchers are urgently turning to new ways of doing research that create conditions for other ways of living and learning, and which materialize new kinds of research relations and questions. It is fundamentally about practicing an ethics based on response-ability, stewardship, care, and reciprocity that centre relationships to land, territory, human and more-than-human bodies. This paper/presentation will take up these important ethical dimensions of doing walking research and share some exemplifications from my research-creation practice.

Understories: On the Politics of Long-Distance Hiking
a lecture by Toby Beauchamp

The well-established outdoor ethical principle of "leave no trace" promotes environmental protection through minimizing human impact: in its most idealized form, ethical outdoor recreation will leave behind no indication of human presence on the landscape. This talk uses the concept of "leave no trace" as a springboard for consideration of hiking trails. Rather than imagining these paths as tools for removing human presence, the talk seeks out the social, historical, and political traces that hiking trails can both illuminate and obscure. It pays close attention to specific long-distance trail systems, including the Ice Age Trail in Wisconsin, to discover how these trails can transmit complex stories about militarism, restoration, redistribution, and belonging.

Stephanie Springgay is an Associate Professor at the University of Toronto. She is a leading scholar of research-creation with a focus on walking, affect, queer theory, and contemporary art as pedagogy. Her SSHRC-funded research-creation projects include WalkingLab (www.walkinglab.com) and The Pedagogical Impulse(www.thepedagogicalimpulse.com). She has published widely on contemporary art, curriculum studies, and qualitative research methodologies.

Toby Beauchamp is Assistant Professor of Gender and Women's Studies and affiliate faculty in the Unit for Criticism and Interpretive Theory at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. His first book, Going Stealth: Transgender Politics and U.S. Surveillance Practices (Duke University Press, 2019) shows how the scrutinizing of gender nonconformity is motivated less by explicit transgender identities than by the perceived threat that gender nonconformity poses to the U.S. racial and security state. Prof. Beauchamp's new research brings trans studies into conversation with the environmental humanities to consider topics such as the transnational production and circulation of synthetic hormones, U.S. border patrol and ecological destruction, and the creation and maintenance of long-distance hiking trails. His writing has appeared in journals including GLQ, Feminist Formations, and Surveillance & Society, as well as several edited book collections.

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Jenny Eddy Conference Room

Thomas C. Pleger Science Building, UW Baraboo/Sauk County Campus

1006 Connie Rd.

Baraboo, WI

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