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Knit-A-Long: About Elvira Hulett: What her story tells us about the Shakers

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Registered knitters and interested observers are invited to learn about Sister Elvira Hulett and what her story tells us about Shaker life.

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Are you interested to learn more about Sister Elvira Hulett's life and work? A slide presentation will be followed by time for discussion and questions, followed by instruction and demonstration for attaching a backing and braided edge to the “rugs.” 

It is not too late to participate! Register for this event and fill out this form to receive free instructions and color charts which have been based upon close observation of the rugs in the collection.  The Zoom gatherings and in-person clinics (times and locations TBD) will guide you through the techniques needed to make an “Elvira rug” in whatever size appeals to your time and ambition, using yarn of your own choosing. Register for each Zoom independently to receive the meeting links.

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Organizer Shaker Museum

Organizer of Knit-A-Long: About Elvira Hulett: What her story tells us about the Shakers

Shaker Museum holds the world’s most comprehensive collection of Shaker objects, archives, and books, and stewards the historic North Family site at Mount Lebanon, the founding community of the Shakers.

The Shaker Museum was founded in 1950 by John S. Williams, Sr. on his farm in Old Chatham, New York. Beginning in the 1930s, Williams traveled extensively to then-active Shaker communities and collected examples of their arts, industries, and domestic life, as well as spiritual artifacts. His approach was that of an anthropologist documenting the decline of a culture. Today the museum’s collection is a prime resource for scholars and curators.

In 2004, the museum became the owner and steward of the North Family site at Mount Lebanon Shaker Village, consisting of 11 Shaker buildings on 91 acres, and the museum’s name was changed from Shaker Museum & Library to Shaker Museum | Mount Lebanon.

The Mount Lebanon site is open year-round. The Old Chatham site, which houses collections storage, the library, and the administrative offices, is open year-round by appointment.


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