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KCBH 2021: Majorities & Minorities in Contemporary Britain

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King's Contemporary British History 2021: Majorities and Minorities in Contemporary Britain - 6th-7th July 2021

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This is the fourth annual conference of King’s Contemporary British History (KCBH). Like our previous conferences, such those on ‘Contemporary British History now’ (2017) and ‘British Futures’ (2019), this is no ordinary conference. Panels are there to introduce and stimulate discussion of a theme, not least involving the whole audience. This is not a conference for the presentation of research papers, but one designed for reflection and discussion. It is also one which brings together historians taking differing positions, working on very different topics, and following different sorts of methods.

This year our theme is Majorities and Minorities—the ways in which they have been formed, contested, changed, understood and characterized. Our expectation is that a discussion of minorities and majorities—intellectual, political, religious and military as well as social, sexual, and racial—and the way in which they have interacted with each other will open up new possibilities for thinking about contemporary British history as well as our practices as contemporary British historians.

Each roundtable brings together leading scholars, at different stages of their careers, working on different topics. In addition, each features a ‘prompt’ from a different KCL postgraduate student highlighting their own research and the way it interacts with the theme of the roundtable as well as questions to provoke and stimulate discussion. These will be published on the KCBH website one week in advance (https://www.kcl.ac.uk/research/kcbh).

The conference will conclude with the Twentieth Century British History Journal Ben Pimlott Memorial Lecture which this year is being given by Kennetta Hammond Perry. Registration for the conference also includes registration for the lecture.

N.b. Microsoft Teams ‘invites’ will be sent out on the 5th of July to the email address attendees used to register on eventbrite.

Majorities in Contemporary Britain: Tuesday 6th July, 1 – 2.30pm, MS Teams

• Shahmima Akhtar (Royal Holloway)

• Julie Gottlieb (University of Sheffield)

• Robert Saunders (QMUL)

• Richard Vinen (KCL)

Prompt: Honor Morris (KCL)

Chair: Kit Kowol (KCL)

Majority and Minority Thought and Opinion: Tuesday 6th July, 3.30-5pm, MS Teams

• Liam Liburd (KCL)

• Benjamin Bland (KCL)

• Lucy DeLap (University of Cambridge)

• Lawrence Black (University of York)

Prompt: Kate Milliken (KCL)

Chair: Sarah Stockwell (KCL)

Majority-Minority Relations: Wednesday 7th July, 9.30-11am, MS Teams

• Conor Morrissey (KCL)

• Sam Brewitt-Taylor (Independent)

• David Feldman (Birkbeck)

• Emily Rutherford (University of Oxford)

Prompt: George Evans (KCL)

Chair: Anna Maguire (QMUL)

Forgotten Minorities: Wednesday 7th July, 12-1.30pm, MS Teams

• Jessica Meyer (University of Leeds)

• David Edgerton (KCL)

• Simon Sleight (KCL)

• Jane Ridley (University of Buckingham)

Prompt: Emma Bradley (KCL)

Chair: Jon Wilson (KCL)

Twentieth Century British History Journal Ben Pimlott Memorial Lecture, Wednesday 7th of July, 3pm, MS Teams

Kennetta Hammond Perry (De Montfort University): ‘David Oluwale’s Britain: A Political History of Black Life’

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Organizer King's Contemporary British History

Organizer of KCBH 2021: Majorities & Minorities in Contemporary Britain

King's Contemporary British History (KCBH) is a cross-departmental and cross-Faculty research initiative, which brings together existing expertise in twentieth-century British history from across King’s College London. It draws together the extraordinary strengths in the subject found mainly in the departments of History, War Studies, Defence Studies, Political Economy and English. King’s has around 50 Professors, Readers, Senior Lecturers and Lecturers in the field of modern and contemporary British history.

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