$16

JEFF The Brotherhood & Speedy Ortiz

City Farm Presents Summer Series at Industry City
ALL AGES

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Industry City

238 36th Street

Courtyard 1-2 (Food Hall Entrance)

Brooklyn, NY 11232

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Event description
City Farm Presents:
Summer Series at Industry City
✹ JEFF The Brotherhood
✹ Speedy Ortiz

About this Event

Doors 7:30PM ✹ Show 8:00PM

$16 ADV ✹ $20 Day of Show ✹ All Ages


ABOUT SUMMER SERIES AT INDUSTRY CITY▶

Created by the team behind Brooklyn venues The Bell House and Union Hall, City Farm Presents returns to Industry City for a second summer of outdoor shows in Courtyard 1-2! From June-September, this season features an expanded schedule with more than 35 concerts and dance parties. Audiences can expect to discover a diverse line-up featuring genres spanning rock, soul, electronic, jazz, world and beyond. This summer will introduce thoughtful artist curation to an already unique and creative space, bringing a fresh take on the New York City outdoor concert experience. For more information, visit our Website or the City Farm Presents Facebook, Instagram or Twitter.

All Summer Series shows are located at Industry City in Courtyard 1-2 (info and directions below).

Doors open one hour prior to performance unless otherwise noted.


VENUE ADDRESS ▶

Industry City - Courtyard 1-2

Entrance at 238 36th Street (Food Hall Entrance)

Brooklyn, NY 11232 | Google Maps


DIRECTIONS TO THE VENUE ▶

☞ BY CAR

There is a paid designated parking lot accessible via 2nd Avenue between 32nd Street and 36th Street

☞ BY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION

D / N / R to 36th Street

B63 Bus to 36th Street

☞ BY BIKE

There are bike racks located throughout the Industry City campus.

There is a Citi Bike bike sharing station located at 2nd Ave between 36th Street and 35th Street, and another at the corner of 2nd Ave and 39th Street.


FOOD OPTIONS AT INDUSTRY CITY▶

Eat your heart out Brooklyn. From Korean comfort food to Instagram-famous Avocado toasts, Industry City’s Food Hall is a delicious culinary gathering place in the center of campus. Stroll along Innovation Alley and beyond to discover other Brooklyn-based purveyors serving up local craft spirits distilled on site and some of the country’s best BBQ.

  • Table 87 Pizza
  • Burger Joint
  • Ends Meat
  • Avocaderia
  • Taco Mix
  • Recently opened Japan Village (Building 4)
  • Hometown BBQ (Building 5 - Opening Soon!)

Click Here For Food Options Near Courtyard 1-2 in Industry City


VENUE BAR HOURS ▶

Our venue bar is open for all scheduled performances at doors, and in addition to:

Thursday-Friday: Opens at 4:00PM

Saturday-Sunday: Opens at Noon

✴ Happy Hour! ✴

Weekdays 4:00pm-7:00pm, $1 off all beer, wine and well!


RAIN OR SHINE POLICY▶

All Performances are Rain or Shine. In the event of dangerous weather we will be communicating updates on our website, Facebook, Instagram Stories and Twitter.


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ABOUT JEFF THE BROTHERHOOD ✹

JEFF The Brotherhood, the project of brothers Jake and Jamin Orrall, started in a basement in Nashville, TN in 2002. From their basement beginnings they have traced a journey that has taken them around the world several times over, from DIY shows and self-released albums to major label contracts, network television appearances and the international festival circuit. The Brotherhood was started with one goal in mind: to do or create whatever they feel with no rules or boundaries, but despite the freewheeling creativity that has underpinned their career, the band's 13th full length album, Magick Songs (out September 7th on Dine Alone) marks a radical departure from their catalog to date.

Recorded in a bare bones studio, built in Jake Orrall's Nashville living room, over a 5 month span, the album involves a host of new collaborators including Jenna Moynihan of Daddy Issues, Bully's Reece Lazarus, and the majority of the album's compositions were written in collaboration with Kunal Prakash (Viva L'American Death Ray Music/Quintron's Weather Warlock Band) and Jack Lawrence (Raconteurs/The Dead Weather) who became fully fledged members of the band. It was a unique experience for the brothers, who had recorded each of their preceding 12 full lengths in studios under the guidance of professional engineers.

"It was a huge change for us," Jake Orrall says, "but the music that we had been making up to this point had just kind of fizzled out. It got stale for us. We felt like we’d hit a dead end and we were really excited to try some new things. We built this record from scratch with all of us in a room together which was a really different approach than anything we'd done before, and spent 5 months working day in and day out. Our average time for recording a record before this was 3 days, so there wasn’t really any room or time for this kind of experimentation."

Magick Songs explores a host of new influences, while emphasizing different shades of sounds that have coloured The Brotherhood's previous releases. Elements of 80's and 90s Japanese experimental music (Orrall, who recently contributed liner notes to a Light In The Attic compilation of Japanese "New Music," sites Yellow Magic Orchestra, Haruomi Honso, Midori Takada, Satoshi Asakawa and Motohiko Hamase) meld with Indonesian Gamelan forms (derived from the releases in the Nonesuch Explorer series and the music of 70s experimental collective Geinoh Yamashirogumi), clever improvisation and abundant hand percussion and synthesizer. Elsewhere heavy psych, drone and the brother's rarely tapped interest in extreme metal blends with the kraut rock that has long inspired them to stretch their sound towards the outer reaches of space rock squall. Thematically they toy with a broader concept for the first time in their career, synthesizing Asimov's Foundation trilogy, Studio Ghibli films, sci fi anime like Neon Genesis Evangelion and Akira, and their own meticulously recorded dreams into a loose narrative that informs the albums lyrics.

Their compositional approach has also shifted, with the album constructed from a series of extended improvisations that were then edited down and reassembled into more conventional song structures by Jake Orrall and tied together with overdubs in later sessions. This technique results in frequently unusual arrangements that rarely repeat exactly, instead cycling through subtle variations around each chord progression. In a sense it's the total opposite of the garage rock and pop songwriting style that has popularly defined the band, and feels like an exorcism of the last ghosts of the band's Warner days.

"There’s so much preconception now about our band, and people have already made up their minds about what kind of band we are, which isn’t really what we’re about at this point in our lives," says Orrall. "At one point we took a shot at being a radio rock band, and it was an interesting experience and the record that we made taught me a lot about songwriting and production. You've gotta try these things and it was an interesting opportunity artistically as much as anything. This record is another opportunity, with no restraints outside of taking our sound in the directions we want to take it."

The benefit of the experience, won over what has remarkably already been a 16 year career, is apparent throughout Magick Songs, and it is the combination of that discipline and deliberation with a boundless creative spirit that drives the album. More than a new chapter, Magick Songs reads like a whole new book.

JEFF The Brotherhood's Magick Songs will be released on Dine Alone Records on September 7th. It is available for preorder here.


ABOUT SPEEDY ORTIZ ✹

“Necessary brattiness” is the motto for Speedy Ortiz’s dauntless new collection of songs, Twerp Verse. The follow-up to 2015’s Foil Deer, the band’s latest indie rock missive is prompted by a tidal wave of voices, no longer silent on the hurt they’ve endured from society’s margins. But like many of these truth-tellers, songwriter, guitarist and singer Sadie Dupuis scales the careful line between what she calls being “outrageous and practical” in order to be heard at all.

“You need to employ a self-preservational sense of humor to speak truth in an increasingly baffling world,” says Dupuis. “I call it a ‘twerp verse’ when a musician guests on a track and says something totally outlandish - like a Lil Wayne verse - but it becomes the most crucial part. This record is our own twerp verse, for those instances when you desperately need to stand up and show your teeth.”

Twerp Verse was tracked in Brooklyn DIY space Silent Barn, mixed by Omaha legend Mike Mogis (Bright Eyes, Rilo Kiley) and mastered by Grammy-nominated engineer Emily Lazar (Sia, Haim, Beck). The record pulls from the most elastic pop moments in Squeeze’s Argybargy and the seesawing synth-rock of Deerhoof and the Rentals. With Dupuis on guitars, vocals, and synths, supporting guitarist Andy Molholt (of psych pop outfit Laser Background) now joins Speedy veterans Darl Ferm on bass and Mike Falcone on drums - and together they accelerate the band’s idiosyncrasy through the wilderness of Dupuis’ heady reflections on sex, lies and audiotape.

Dupuis, who both earned an MFA in poetry and taught at UMass Amherst, propels the band’s brain-teasing melodies with her serpentine wit. Inspired by the cutting observations of Eve Babitz, Aline Crumb’s biting memoirs, and the acute humor of AstroPoet Dorothea Lasky, Dupuis craftily navigates the danger zone that is building intimacy and political allyship in 2018. Now as public pushback against the old guards reaches a fever pitch - in the White House, Hollywood and beyond - the band fires shots in disillusioned Gen Y theme “Lucky 88,” and casts a side-eye towards suitors-turned-monsters in the cold-blooded single “Villain.” Closing track “You Hate The Title” is a slinky traipse through the banality of this current moment in patriarchy - in which survivors are given the mic, but nitpicked over the timbre of their testimonies. “You hate the title, but you’re digging the song,” Dupuis sings wryly, “You like it in theory, but it’s rubbing you wrong.” Tuned smartly to the political opacity of the present, Twerp Verse rings clear as a bell.


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Performers

Date and Time

Location

Industry City

238 36th Street

Courtyard 1-2 (Food Hall Entrance)

Brooklyn, NY 11232

View Map

Refund Policy

No Refunds

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