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Importance of Non-Chemical Stressors on Children’s Health and Well-Being

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Importance of Non-Chemical Stressors on Children’s Health and Well-Being

Date: Wednesday December 19, 2017

Time: 3:00pm - 4:30pm (EST)


ABSTRACT:

This seminar will summarize research that aims to synthesize and rank non-chemical stressors from a child’s social environment.

Non-chemical stressors are found in the built, natural and social environments and include physical factors (e.g., noise, temperature, humidity) and psychosocial factors (e.g., social support, drug use). Existing research shows correlations between exposure to non-chemical stressors found in a child’s social environment (e.g., food security, violence, acculturation) and changes in children’s health and well-being. When compared to adults, children may be more vulnerable to the combined interactions of chemical and non-chemical stressors due to their developmental stage (e.g., physiology, metabolism, surface area to body weight ratio, absorption rates), lifestage-specific activities and behaviors, and dependence on caregivers for quality of life.

SPEAKER BIO:

Dr. Kathleen Hibbert is a post-doctoral researcher in the U.S. EPA's Office of Research and Development, National Exposure Research Laboratory, located in Research Triangle Park, NC. She is a trained social scientist with expertise in Social Ecology. She is conducting research under the EPA project “Assessing Environmental Health Disparities in Vulnerable Groups,” with a focus on the impact of non-chemical stressors (e.g., temperature, SES, stress, social support) on children’s health. Specifically, she is studying how non-chemical stressors found in a child’s social environment influence the biological response to a chemical agent.

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