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Immigration, Exclusion, and the American Dream: Teaching the Chinese Exclus...

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Hanahauoli School Professional Development Center

1922 Makiki Street

Honolulu, HI 96822

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Join the Chinese Community Action Coalition of Honolulu and Hanahau‘oli School for a film screening and candid discussion about

Immigration, Exclusion, and the American Dream: Teaching the Chinese Exclusion Act To Reflect on Current Times

Monday, September 30, 2019
5:30 to 7:30 pm

Pupus and refreshments will be provided


THE 1882 CHINESE EXCLUSION ACT HAD A PROFOUND IMPACT UPON THE CHINESE IN THE UNITED STATES AND IN 1900 UPON THE NEW TERRITORY OF HAWAI'I. THE PRIMARY EFFECT WAS THE DRAMATIC DECREASE IN THE CHINESE POPULATION IN BOTH THE US MAINLAND AND HAWAI'I.

Li-Shin Yu and Ric Burns’ documentary The Chinese Exclusion Act is the story of the welcome that the United States gave to Chinese immigrants. There is much to be learned from this excellent history of how the self-proclaimed “nation of immigrants” treated the would-be Chinese settlers.

At this public talk, we will screen the abridged version of the film and provide an opportunity for participants to engage with panelists about the power of teaching the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act in current times.

Hear from Dr. Gregory Mark and Dr. Bryan Man, members of the Chinese Community Action Coalition, who will comment on the film and share their knowledge about the history of Chinese Americans on the US mainland and here in Hawaii. They will share personal stories and findings from their scholarship and research, drawing links to contemporary immigration debates. Ms. Jingwoan Chang, Hanahau'oli School's JK-6 Mandarin teacher, will explain how we can use resources like this in connection with classroom themes or activities in other disciplines while also engaging a broader discussion about identity as we build Mandarin language proficiency skills. Dr. Amber Strong Makaiau, social studies educator and Director of the Hanahau'oli School Professional Development Center, will briefly share how the topics discussed can be incorporated into secondary level Ethnic Studies courses that are now being required for graduation across the US. This will be followed by the opportunity to ask questions and engage in discussion with panelists and other audience members. Pupus and refreshments will be served.


Program:

5:30 Welcome: Pupu & Drinks
5:40 Introductions: PDC & Film
5:50 Film Screening
6:45 Presentation: Dr. Greg Mark, Mr. Bryan Man, Ms. Jingwoan Chang, Dr. Amber Strong Makaiau
7:15 Questions and Discussion
7:30 Pau


About the Presenters:

Dr. Gregory Yee Mark received his Doctorate in Criminology from the University of California, Berkeley. At the California State University, Sacramento, Dr. Mark is a Professor Emeritus in the Department of Ethnic Studies, and the former Director for the Asian American Studies Program. He was the Principal Investigator/Director for a Centers for Disease Control (CDC) funded Youth Violence Prevention Center at the University of Hawai’i at Manoa. In 1986, he co-founded the Chinese Community Action Coalition of Honolulu (CCAC). His research interests are community mobilization, immigrant youth gangs, violence prevention, Chinese American history and communities, United States drug legislation, Service-Learning, early Chinese American films, and the Civil Rights Movement.

Dr. Bryan Dai Yung Man received his Doctorate in Sociology from UCLA. He currently serves as the President of the Chinese Community Action Coalition (CCAC) as well as a Professor of Sociology in the Behavioral Sciences Program at Chaminade University. He has served as a former Chair of the Behavioral Sciences Program as well as Director of the Master in Counseling Psychology Program at Chaminade University. Brian’s Research interest in Asian American Communities, in particular, Chinese communities in Hawaii.

Jingwoan Chang has been teaching Mandarin Chinese since 2007 at public and private schools in Hawaii, California, and Illinois. Ms. Chang currently teaches grades JK-6 at Hanahau'oli School who recently completed its first year of school-wide Mandarin instruction. She became a teacher through the Chicago Teaching Fellows program and has a Master of Arts degree in East Asian Languages and Civilizations from University of Chicago, a Master of Arts degree in history from San Jose State University, and a Bachelor of Business Administration from University of Texas at Austin. As a graduate student, she conducted primary-source research into portrayals of Chinese women in 19th century San Francisco, and how the focus on prostitution and footbinding among Chinese women became part of the "moral argument" against Chinese immigration. She has presented at a number of conferences about proficiency-based language instruction and the role of language education as part of nurturing global citizenship.

Dr. Amber Strong Makaiau is an Associate Specialist at the University of Hawaii at Manoa College of Education Institute for Teacher Education Secondary Program. She is also the Director of the Hanahau’oli School Professional Development Center and the Director of Curriculum and Research at the University of Hawai‘i Uehiro Academy for Philosophy and Ethics in Education. She is a dedicated practitioner of philosophy for children Hawai‘i who achieved National Board Certification while teaching secondary social studies in the Hawaii State Department of Education for over ten years. Her current projects include carrying out progressive, multicultural, social justice, and democratic approaches to pre-service social studies teacher education, using self-study research methodologies to promote international collaboration, and developing the emergent field of deliberative pedagogy.

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Hanahauoli School Professional Development Center

1922 Makiki Street

Honolulu, HI 96822

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No Refunds

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