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"Fragmented"  Workshop, UCD Dublin- Hybrid Event

"Fragmented" Workshop, UCD Dublin- Hybrid Event

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Free

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Location

O'Brien Centre for Science

Stillorgan Road

Belfield

Ireland

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(Re-)Assembly – Creating lifeway narratives from fragmented (bio)archaeological records

About this event

(Bio)Archaeological approaches to answering questions about past lifeways have diversified immensely in the last decade and are now ranging from increasingly specialised macroscopic/morphological analysis of skeletal features to a range of biomolecular methods. For prehistory in particular, recurring questions researchers aim to answer with these complementary approaches concern mobility, kinship, crisis, diet and conflict. These are also some of the issues at the heart of the ERC-funded ‘The Fall of 1200 BC: The role of migration and conflict in social crises at end of the Bronze Age in South-eastern Europe’ (http://www.thefall1200.eu), which is hosting this workshop. This workshop is also in collaboration with Jacqui Mulville and Katie Faillace from Cardiff University.

The proposed workshop provides a forum to not only consider the merits of individual and multi-proxi approaches, but to discuss the challenges posed by the often fragmented records, and therefore incomplete and disparate (skeletal) datasets, that are used to address big questions about the past. Fragmented records not only require methodological but also statistical and conceptual solutions when trying to formulate narratives on past lifeways.

Workshop program

In person attendance at: SCIH 1.49 ALE Room, at the O' Brien Centre for Science, UCD campus

Friday - 27/5/2022 (As part of the ERC-funded project “The Fall of 1200 BC: The role of migration and conflict in social crises at the end of the Bronze Age in South-eastern Europe”; www.thefall1200.eu). Participants are kindly requested to keep the timing; 15 minutes maximum time for the power point presentation following 15 minutes of a short discussion. Please find below the zoom link for Day 1.

https://ucd-ie.zoom.us/j/66381834359?pwd=TFVXQi9peGgzYmhBU3pUUGxuOE1hdz09

14.00- 14.15 pm: Welcoming remarks and short Introduction. Dimitra E. Michael and Linda Fibiger (University College Dublin and the University of Edinburgh)

14.15-14.45 pm: Poor preservation? No problem. Using dental nonmetric traits to assess population affinities among human skeletal samples. Joel Irish (Liverpool John Moores University).

14.45-15.15 pm: Fragmented Remains: Protocols for Peri-Mortem and Post-Mortem (Funerary) Fragmentation . Chris Knüsel (University of Bordeaux)

15.15-15.45 pm: Reconstructing mortuary practices: Can we really get past fragmented approaches to fragmented bones? Ioanna Moutafi (The Malcolm H. Wiener Laboratory for Archaeological Science)

15.45-15.10 pm: Coffee break

15.10-15.40 pm: Human mobility: challenges (and some prospects) for fragmented human skeletal assemblages. Efthymia Nikita (The Cyprus Institute)

15.40-16.10 pm: Decoding cremated remains in the prehistoric Aegean: the TEFRA project. Sevi Triantaphyllou (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki).

16.10 pm: Group Discussion

Saturday – 28/5/2022 (In collaboration with Jacqui Mulville and Katie Faillace from Cardiff University). Participants are kindly requested to keep the timing; 15 minutes maximum time for the power point presentation including time for questions and short comments. Please find below the zoom link for Day 2.

https://ucd-ie.zoom.us/j/65819737851?pwd=QTA5Z2VMQTRZUk1Da3dMTTNqdE1PQT09

9.30-9.45 am: The Early Medieval Cemetery at Sedgeford: The many pieces of a Disarticulated Puzzle. Sophie Beckett and Lucy Koster (Cranfield Forensic Institute)

9.45-10.00 am: Recording burned human remains from commingled burials through macroscopic and analytical methods. Yannis Chatzikonstantinou (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki; Vrije Universiteit Brussel)

10.00-10.15 am: The disarticulated dead through time. Sharon Clough (Cotswold Archaeology Cirencester).

10.15-10.30 am: Coming Apart: disarticulation in late Iron Age and early Roman 'ritual' contexts. Ellen Green (University of Reading).

10.30-10.45 am: Living with the dead: Researching the broken bodies of Iron Age Britain. Michael Legge (University of York).

10.45-11.15 am: Coffee break

11.15-11.30 am: Dead but still present: The analysis of the fragmented bone assemblages from the Covesea Caves, NE Scotland. Charlotte Primeau, Tom Booth, Lindsey Buster and Ian Armit (University of York).

11.30-11.45 am: Reconstructing the Fragmented Dead: Methodological and Analytical Challenges in the Interpretation of Romano-British Decapitation Burials. Shaheen Christie (University of Wisconsin Milwaukee).

11.45-12.00 pm: The Decent: Geographical Information System Mapping as a Method of Quantification in Osteoarchaeological and Taphonomic Analysis of Early Neolithic Human Remains from Cave Burials in North-Western England. Keziah Claire Warburton (University of Central Lancashire).

12.00-12.15 pm: Commingled remains from the prehistoric Hypogeum of Calaforno (Giarratana, Sicily): approaches for the osteological study of a complex multi-function archaeological site. Elena Varotto, Francesco Maria Galassi and Pietro Militello (Flinders University).

12.15 pm: Group Discussion and Final Remarks

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