£12

Fear of the Dentist: Victorian and Modern Perspectives

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The Old Operating Theatre Museum and Herb Garret

9a Saint Thomas Street

London

SE1 9RY

United Kingdom

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Refunds up to 1 day before event

Eventbrite's fee is nonrefundable.

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Doors will open at 6:30 PM for a 7:00 PM start.

In these short talks and panel discussion, Dr. Claire Jones and Dr. Sasha Scambler will discuss the pervasive fear that people have of the dentist. From the Victorian Era to contemporary social constructions of fear of the dentist, our speakers will uncover the realities behind this fear and might give an answer to the questions: shall you fear the dentist? The talk will be followed by a panel discussion and a Q&A session.

* Fear of the Dentist: How Did It Start?

Fear of the dentist is a common affliction today, and a key reason for the avoidance of oral health treatment. In this talk, I uncover some of the historical precedents of this fear. By focusing on the period after 1870, this talk has three main aims: to show how the availability of anaesthesia served to perpetuate this fear, to demonstrate how fear was communal and passed through family generations, and to highlight how important emotions are to the history of oral health and to the study of health more generally.

Dr Claire L. Jones is Lecturer in the History of Medicine and Deputy Director of the Centre for the History of Medicine, Ethics and Medical Humanities at the University of Kent. Claire’s research centres on the cultural, economic and social history of medicine and health in Britain post 1750, with particular emphases on the relationship between medicine and commerce, and the ways in which this relationship affects professional social structures, consumption and material culture. Her current research project focuses on the history of oral health and its inequalities, 1870-1970.

*Social Constructions of Dental Fear

Fear of the dentist remains one of the most common fears across Europe despite huge advances in treatment options, materials and pain relief. It is a key reason for high levels of unmet dental need in the UK and in many other countries. In this talk, I focus in on the ways that dental fear is socially reproduced through family networks and through social representations of dentistry within literature, film and the media. Contextualising dental fear in this way allows us to see how the fear has become separated from the experiences of dentistry itself. I will argue that dental fear becomes one component in a package of barriers which make people less likely and/or able to seek help even when need is recognised.

Dr Sasha Scambler is Senior Lecturer in Medical Sociology at King’s College London. Her research focuses on the experiences of people living with long term conditions, disability, inequality in all its various forms and the application of social theory. She is an editor of the journal Sociology of Health and Illness and a contributing editor of the British Sociological Association (BSA) affiliated ‘cost of living blog’. She is a member of the British Sociological Association Medical Sociology Group committee.

Tickets: £12.00.

*Access is through a 52-step spiral staircase. For more information on access and our space, please, visit our website at http://www.oldoperatingtheatre.com/visiting-us.

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Date and Time

Location

The Old Operating Theatre Museum and Herb Garret

9a Saint Thomas Street

London

SE1 9RY

United Kingdom

View Map

Refund Policy

Refunds up to 1 day before event

Eventbrite's fee is nonrefundable.

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