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EVENING TALK: The relationship between rifting history, palaeogeography and...

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Imperial College - Royal School of Mines

Prince Consort Rd

Kensington

London

SW7 2BP

United Kingdom

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About the Speaker

Iain Scotchman received his BSc in Geology from University of Leicester in 1978. In 1984 he received his PhD (thesis “Diagenesis of the Kimmeridge Clay Formation, Onshore UK”) from University of Sheffield. He has worked as a geologist since January 1982 for Gaffney Cline & Associates, Phillips Petroleum, Amoco (UK), Enterprise Oil. During his career he was trained by Amoco in 1989-1990 as an Organic Geochemist. In April 1997 Iain joined Statoil in London, where he worked until his retirement in March 2017. He is now a consultant petroleum geochemist/systems analyst/geologist.

Iain has experience in UK North Sea, north & west of UK, Ireland, Faroes and Brazil.

Since mid-2008 he has been working on Unconventional Hydrocarbons as a geologist for Statoil’s entry into shale gas with Marcellus Shale, shale gas in Karoo, North Africa, China, shale oil in Rockies area of USA.

2013 – Faroes exploration, well 2014.

2014 – 2017 working West of Shetlands, Ireland & N. Atlantic Conjugate margins petroleum systems.

The abstract

Oil-source correlation studies along the north-east Atlantic Ocean margin west of Britain and Ireland indicate source intervals ranging in age from Middle to Late Jurassic and in facies from lacustrine/fluvio-deltaic to marginal marine form the dominant regional Jurassic petroleum system of the NE Atlantic. This contrasts with the common assumption of a ubiquitous marine Late Jurassic rich, oil-prone source rock as seen, for example, in the syn-rift North Viking Graben and Haltenbanken.

The distribution of Jurassic source rocks along the Atlantic Ocean margin is strongly related to the development of rift basins associated with the break-up of Pangaea. Marine flooding of the Permo-Triassic rifts in the earliest Jurassic resulted in the earliest source rocks of Hettangian – Sinemurian age in the more southern parts of the basin system with a Tethyan fauna. Younger source rocks with a boreal provinciality occur in the Sinemurian –Toarcian, the Toarcian marking the maximum extent of the transgression with widespread deposition of rich, marine source rocks through much of the basin system.

Regional uplift in the Middle Jurassic led to a major marine regression and non-marine lacustrine and fluvio-deltaic source rocks were deposited during both the Aalenian and in the Bathonian – Callovian of the Hebrides and Slyne Basins, continuing into the Oxfordian and Kimmeridgian with only limited marine influences. These source rocks are very widespread through the basin system including the Porcupine and Faroe-Shetland Basins, the Jeanne d’Arc and Flemish Pass Basins on the Canadian conjugate margin and the Lusitania Basin of Iberia.

Late Jurassic tectonics had a strong influence on source rock deposition with thick, marine oil-prone shales deposited in rifting basins in the North Viking Graben, Haltenbanken and Barents Sea. However, the Atlantic Margin basins do not show an equivalent thick Late Jurassic source rock development with just a relatively thin transgressive “skim” of rich source rock overlying the thick Middle – Late Jurassic section, seen in the Porcupine and Faroe-Shetland Basins. Elsewhere non-marine deposition took place with limited marine influences, such as on the Canadian margin, with lacustrine source rocks deposited in the North Celtic Sea Basin. This may have major impact on our understanding of the late Jurassic palaeogeography of the region.

Widespread regional uplift at the end of the Jurassic ended source rock deposition, heralding the onset of major plate-break up between Canada, Iberia and Ireland in the early Cretaceous. A major new rift basin system developed and open marine conditions in these often hyper-extending basins unified the marine systems of the proto NE Atlantic, flooding the former restricted basin systems which promoted the formation of Jurassic source rocks. Occasional phases of oceanic anoxia in the Hauterivian – Barremian and later in the Aptian and Turonian-Cenomanian deposited thin but widespread rich marine black shales with source potential, primarily gas-prone.


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The entrance to the venue is from Prince Consort Rd. Please, note that the door closes at 18:00! Please, arrive earlier.

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Imperial College - Royal School of Mines

Prince Consort Rd

Kensington

London

SW7 2BP

United Kingdom

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