Environmentally Driven Value Creation

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The Center | The Heritage Group

6320 Intech Boulevard

Indianapolis, IN 46278

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Registration for this event has closed. If you have questions, please contact Meg Whelton at mwhelton@purdue.edu.
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Purdue Environmental and Ecological Engineering is hosting a free technical workshop and social on June 4th for environmental professionals. CEUs will be available for the event. 1:00pm to 4:00pm will be technical talks which concludes with a panel made of the speakers discussing "Environmentally Driven Value Creation" at 4:30pm. A reception will follow the panel discussion at 5:00pm. RSVP required for this event. Please respond by May 20th if you plan to attend. Technical talk topics include PFAS, Phosphorus, Green Manufacturing, Selling Waste Algae, and Value from E-waste. More information on the speakers and presentations is given below. 3.5 PDHs will be available for professional engineers and wastewater operator CEUs are under review. Moderator for the event will be Purdue EEE and CE Professor Larry Nies.


1:00pm

"Selecting Effective PFAS Treatment Strategies" Rebecca Slabaugh, PE of Arcadis

Poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are among the most important emerging contaminants of concern in the water industry today. Although several high-profile cases of PFAS environmental contamination, including discharges to both groundwater and surface water supplies, have been widely reported for over 15 years, the widespread detection of PFAS by drinking water utilities participating in USEPA’s third Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Rule (UCMR 3) catapulted this class of contaminants to the forefront of the industry consciousness. Not only are these compounds considered toxic at very low levels (with a USEPA health advisory for the combination of two of the most prevalent species at just 70 ng/L), they are environmentally recalcitrant and can be difficult to remove, even with many advanced water treatment technologies. This presentation provides a broad overview of PFAS in an effort to educate the drinking water community on a critical contemporary issue, covering topics including: contaminant background, sources, occurrence, chemical characteristics, and treatment options.

Biography

Ms. Slabaugh serves as the Drinking Water Practice Lead for Arcadis North America. She holds a Bachelor's Degree in Civil Engineering from Purdue University and a Master's Degree in Environmental Engineering from Virginia Tech. She brings over 13 years of experience engineering and managing drinking water quality, treatment and distribution system projects, including regulatory compliance, process selection and optimization, and emerging water quality issues, across the United States.


1:30pm

"Sustainability Initiatives at Cummins" Karen Cecil, EMSL of Cummins

Ms. Cecil will provide a brief overview of how Cummins is creating the 2050 Environmental Sustainability plan with 2030 goals. This will include important trends the company has identified that may impact stakeholder success. When announced, the plan will include actions, advocacy, and partnerships to sustain communities, economies and ecosystems.

Biography

Ms. Cecil is the Director of Global Environmental Sustainability at Cummins, Inc. She leads the cross-functional, cross-business governance structure that is responsible for setting the direction for environmental actions, including strategy development, evaluating risks and opportunities, goal-setting, engaging internal and external stakeholders, transparent environmental reporting, and business integration.

Karen uses her twenty years’ experience in Quality Management, Lean Operations, Supply Chain, Executive Level Problem Solving, and leading complex change to expand the lens of sustainability through the business, using a pragmatic shared value approach. She led the creation of Cummins’ first comprehensive global environmental sustainability plan focusing on GHG/energy, waste and water. The team is currently working on creation the 2050 Visioning Framework with 2030 goals to be announced during Cummins’ 100th Anniversary in 2019.

She is a certified Six Sigma Master Black Belt and experienced Simplex Innovative Thinking Process facilitator. Karen proudly serves on the Board of Directors for Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Indiana, which was recently named Board of the Year (2017) and Agency of the Year (2018) for mid-sized affiliates. Karen holds an Executive Master’s degree in Sustainability Leadership from Arizona State University.


2:00 pm

“Sustainable Management of Used Electronics: Challenges and Opportunities” Sahle-Demessie Endalkachew, PhD of EPA

Electronic technologies have been increasing throughout the previous four decades. Americans currently own more than 3 billion electronic products that have become critical to their way of life and the growing economy. As the average use-life of electronic products gets shorter; however, obsolete products are stored or discarded at alarming rates. This creates new challenges in the management of electronic waste (e-waste). Americans discard more than 400 million electronic items per year; less than 20 percent is recycled, while 85 percent ends up in landfills.

Approximately two-thirds of the electronic devices removed from service remain functional. Although E-waste represents only two percent of America’s trash in landfills, it contributes 70 percent of all toxic waste. Most electronic products contain hazardous heavy metals, plastics, brominated flame retardants, barium and beryllium, and valuable elements such as precious metals and rare earth elements. The risks to human health associated with placing such products into landfills or incinerators where these hazardous elements can enter the air and water streams are high. Hence, there is increasing challenge of reducing the use of virgin materials, recovering useful elements from the waste and protecting human health and the environment from the harmful effects associated with the unsafe handling and disposal of these products. Scientific research and technological developments are needed for the designing of greener electronics that minimize environmental impacts across the entire lifecycle of the products and promotes consumer awareness. Electronics design and manufacturing that is innovative, flexible and pragmatic could transform the industry’s energy savings, reduce emissions and conserve resources. Innovative solutions that integrate electronics manufacturing and recycling would allow Americans to sustainably manage the electronics used today, while simultaneously promoting novel and innovative technologies of the future to meet market challenges.

Biography

Dr. E. Sahle-Demessie is a senior research scientist at the US Environmental Protection Agency. He has been with the EPA since 1997. He has received his Ms. and Ph.D. in chemical engineering from Oregon State University. His current research focus includes implications of engineered nanomaterials, biosensors, and developing novel technologies for converting industrial waste and by-products into value added feedstocks. He holds five U.S. patents, has authored more than 100 scientific papers and has 200 presentations and refereed abstracts. He has received several awards including: EPA/STD Individual Achievement Awards, IGERT Award, multiple EPA’s Science and Technology Achievement Award, U.S. EPA, Honor Awards, four U.S. EPA Path Forward Innovative Project awards, and in 2013 he received US EPA Silver Medal for Superior Service.


2:30pm

"Generating Revenue from Waste Algae" Kelvin Okamoto, PhD of Gen3Bio

Dr. Okamoto will provide a brief overview of agricultural waste and potential uses and then dive into details on the potential to use algae for producing a broad array of specialty chemicals. The algae can be produced through remediation of flue gas emissions, through nutrient removal from clean wastewater discharge or from harvested algae.

Biography

Dr. Kelvin Okamoto serves as Chief Executive Officer and President at Gen3Bio, Inc. Dr. Okamoto had been Senior Vice President and Chief Technology Officer at Cereplast, Inc. since April 11, 2011 and served as its Senior Vice President of Research and Development since December 01, 2010. Dr. Okamoto is responsible for overseeing the development and implementation of Cereplast's global research and development strategy. He serves as Head Consultant for GreenBottom Line, Inc. Dr. Okamoto has 25+ years of research and development experience in the plastics and packaging industries. A recognized expert in plastics material engineering, his extensive background includes the development and implementation of strategy surrounding corporate sustainable products. Prior to joining Cereplast, Dr. Okamoto served as the Manager of Materials Engineering at Solo Cup Operating Corp. He has also held management positions at Himont (now LyondellBasell), GE Plastics (now SABIC IP), Packaging Corporation of America (now Pactiv), Trexel, Inc. and TaylorMade Adidas Golf. Dr. Okamoto serves as a Director of GreenBottom Line, Inc. He serves as a Director of Gen3Bio, Inc. Dr. Okamoto is the holder of 16 patents and 8 patent applications. A published author of a book on microcellular processing, he is also a member of the American Chemical Society and Society of Plastics Engineers; additionally, Dr. Okamoto is a registered patent agent. Dr. Okamoto holds a PhD in Chemistry from Cornell University and a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry from Stanford University.


3:00pm

“Sustainable Base Oils: Renewable, Non-Toxic, and Biodegradable Base Oils for the Lubricant, Cosmetic, and Pharmaceutical Industries” Matt Kriech, PhD of Heritage

Biosynthetic Technologies (BT) manufactures a revolutionary new class of biobased synthetic molecules that are made from organic fatty acids found in plant oils. These highly-functional “biosynthetic” oils have numerous uses in the lubricant, chemical, cosmetics and pharmaceutical industries, often outperforming their petroleum counterparts in similar applications. In addition to their high-performance properties, these renewable oils are biodegradable and nontoxic.

Biography

Dr. Matt Kriech currently works for THG as the Chief Operating Officer of Biosynthetic Technologies and supports HRG and THG in evaluation of potential new projects and investments. Prior to his current role, he lead the transition team for The Center and worked for AMI in developing predictive economic models. He has also served as General Manager of PIZO and Supply Chain Manager, Tolling Manager, and Business Excellence leader for Monument Chemical. Matt received his B.A. from Wabash College in 2000 and his Ph.D. from the University of Utah in 2005, where he studied protein-lipid interactions using non-linear optical spectroscopy. Prior to returning to Indiana, he worked for ATK as a “Rocket Scientist” in Utah, helping to test and develop state of the art rocket propellants.

He currently resides in Brownsburg with his wife and family. He enjoys flying as a private pilot, hiking, climbing, cycling, and skiing. In his spare time, he brews beer as owner of Wabash Brewing and also serves on local charity boards for cancer and diabetes.


3:30pm

"Recovering Value from End of Use Products: Reuse, Remanufacturing, and Recycling" Prof. John Sutherland of Purdue

There are growing concerns over the management of discarded products and the depletion of the natural resources used in these products. While selected initiatives have had some success at reducing these environmental burdens, relative to the scale of the problem, the actual impact has been modest. What is needed are strategies, technologies, and business models that promote value recovery of end of use (EoU) products – some have termed this a “circular economy.” This presentation will discuss several examples where product reuse, remanufacturing, or recycling has been successfully adopted. It will be seen that these approaches preserve economic value and natural resources, and minimize disposal to landfills.

Biography

Dr. John W. Sutherland is Professor and Fehsenfeld Family Head of Environmental and Ecological Engineering (EEE) at Purdue University. He received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. As Head, he has led the development of the EEE undergraduate degree and graduate degree programs and has grown the department in terms of students, staff, and faculty into one of the largest environmental engineering programs in the U.S. EEE is unique as a department in that it embraces industrial sustainability in addition to classic environmental engineering.

Prior to assuming his present position in 2009, he was the Henes Chair Professor and Director of the Sustainable Futures Institute at Michigan Technological University. Sutherland has mentored over 70 students to the completion of their graduate degrees and has published nearly 250 papers in various journals and conference proceedings. His honors and recognitions include the SME Outstanding Young Manufacturing Engineer Award (1992), Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (1996), SAE Ralph R. Teetor Educational Award (1999), SME Education Award (2009), SAE International John Connor Environmental Award (2010), ASME William T. Ennor Manufacturing Technology Award (2013), and the SME Gold Medal (2018). He is a Fellow of SME (Society of Manufacturing Engineers), ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers), and CIRP (College International pour la Recherche en Productique).


4:00pm

"Nutrient Removal in Wastewater: Current Practice and Future Opportunity" Bob Holden, PE, PhD of Wessler Engineering

Within the State and across the country, nutrient removal in wastewater treatment is becoming more commonplace. As effluent limits are either implemented and/or reduced, new challenges arise in treatment costs from both capital and operational perspectives. Further, new recovery techniques offer the ability to reclaim nutrients for future use, but at a cost. This talk will present a high level overview of the current practice and industry trends in addressing nutrient limits.

Biography

Dr. Holden received his Bachelor's (1990), Master's (1992) and Doctorate (1999) in Civil Engineering at Purdue University. He has more than 25 years of experience in municipal and industrial projects, and currently serves as Vice President and Senior Project Manager in Wessler's Wastewater group.


RSVP required for this event. Please respond by May 17th if you plan to attend.


FAQs

Are there ID or minimum age requirements to enter the event?

This is event is for environmental professionals and alcohol may be present at the reception. If someone is attending that is under 21, please let us know.

What are my transport/parking options for getting to and from the event?

Ample parking is available at the Center. As an environmentally minded organization, we encourage you to carpool.

How can I contact the organiser with any questions?

For questions, please contact Meg Whelton, EEE Manager of Industrial Experience at mwhelton@purdue.edu.

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The Center | The Heritage Group

6320 Intech Boulevard

Indianapolis, IN 46278

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