Environmental Collapse: Native Perspectives on the Land, Protection and Ste...

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Museum of Indian Arts & Culture

710 Camino Lejo

Santa Fe, NM 87505

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Sales Have Ended

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If you have any questions about the event please send an email to barbara@nativeartsandcultures.org.
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Friday, August 16th

10:00 am - Panel Discussion


Presented by Native Arts and Cultures Foundation (NACF) in collaboration with the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture (MIAC):

MIAC and NACF welcome Native leadership working to confront the significant environmental challenges affecting Native communities. Climate change is the defining issue of our time from shifting weather patterns that threaten food production, rising sea levels that increase the risk of catastrophic flooding, to the lack of water. The impacts of climate change are global in scope and unprecedented in scale. Parallel with climate change, tribal nations face an extraction industry that is resistant to change, and public policies that exclude tribes in decisions relative to their own lands. Without drastic action today, adapting to these impacts in the future threaten tribal nations, peoples, and our cultures. The speakers will shed light on some of the strategies being used through their arts practice and creative work to overcome the onslaught on Native land, shift narratives and public policy, and bring healing to Native communities.


SESSION SPEAKERS:

Angelo Baca (Diné/Hopi)

Angelo Baca is a Navajo and Hopi filmmaker and a Ph.D. candidate in sociocultural anthropology at NYU. A graduate of the Native Voices Program at the University of Washington, he has created numerous documentaries and collaborative works around such subjects as indigenous food sovereignty, Native youth development, and indigenous international repatriation. He’s also taught Native American literature and media courses at Brown University. In 2016, he directed the ethnographic documentary Shash Jaa': Bears Ears, to illuminate the Utah landscape’s significance to indigenous peoples of the region. Baca is currently the Cultural Resources Coordinator for Dine’ Bikéyah, a nonprofit that works toward the healing of people and the earth by supporting indigenous communities to protect their ancestral lands.

https://shashjaa.wordpress.com/


Dallas Goldtooth (Mdewakanton Dakota and Diné)

Dallas travels extensively across Turtle Island to help fossil fuel and hard rock mining-impacted communities tell their stories through social media, video, and other forms of communication. Dallas is an Indigenous Environmental Network (IEN) media team lead, working with IEN staff, board, and organizational partners from a diverse group of climate justice networks. Along with his many tasks and duties with IEN, he is also a Dakota cultural/language teacher, non-violent direct action trainer, and was one of the outstanding Water Protectors at Standing Rock/Oceti Sakowin Camp fighting the Dakota Access Pipeline. Additionally, he is a co-founder of the Indigenous comedy group, The 1491s, a poet, journalist, traditional artist, powwow emcee, and comedian.

See: https://www.ienearth.org/contact-us/


Princess Daazhraii (Lucaj) Johnson (Neets’aii Gwich’in)

Princess works closely with her home village of Vashrąįį K’oo and is an advocate for environmental and social justice issues for Alaska Native people. She is the former Executive Director of the Gwich’in Steering Committee and previously served as Alaska Director at the Indigenous Leadership Institute. She has been a member of the SAG-AFTRA Native American Committee since 2007 and also serves on the Boards of Directors at IAIA and Dancing with the Spirit. Mrs. Johnson was a Sundance Fellow for the Filmmakers, Producers and Screenwriters Lab, and she was an Emerging Voices Rosenthal Fellow with the PEN Center. Princess is currently working as the Creative Producer/Writer for a new PBS series, Molly of Denali.


MODERATOR:

Lulani Arquette (Native Hawaiian) – President/CEO, Native Arts and Cultures Foundation

Lulani, a theatre performing artist, brings over 25 years of professional experience steering organizations to their highest creativity and potential, advocating for cultural perpetuation and social progress, and catalyzing change in communities. Her current work is focused on how we attend to cultural equity, environmental justice, healing, and economic wellbeing to build a more compassionate and just nation. She is a past board member for Grantmakers in the Arts and currently serves on the Association of Performing Arts Professionals (APAP) board.

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Museum of Indian Arts & Culture

710 Camino Lejo

Santa Fe, NM 87505

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