$10 – $460

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House of Blues Foundation Room

400 Disney Way

#Suite 337

Anaheim, CA 92802

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Celebration of family, music, culture and legacy. The Tini Grey & family have created a tribute album and this is the release party.

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"What's up Eleni?" "Malo Eleni!" "Eleni, Eleni, a falai fa'alelei e sili le manogi". These are the different greetings I received on a daily basis from the time I (Tinifu) attended middle school in Samoa and then high school in Hawaii. I was called "Eleni" as soon as the Samoan kids found out who my dad was: The legendary musician (as they knew him to be), Jerome Grey,who wrote the ahead-of-its-time pop song “Eleni”, a song all about the various ways the poor people of Samoa cooked mackerel—also known as a song of protest—stating in its subtle way how “the rich is getting richer and the poor is getting poorer”. My classmates would sing this tune out loud to poke fun at me, but definitely (in a good way.)

So, what the heck is an Eleni you ask? Well, it's a can of herring or mackerel. Yup, all of this commotion for a can of fish!

So, Eleni was written during a time in Samoa, when the economy was shot. The majority of the people were really poor, but, the politicians were living very comfortable lives. Eleni (that can of mackerel) was one of the few food items affordable to the people (it was on the menu basically every day of the week), so, my dad wrote a song about it. Using his comedic wit, the lyrics explain all the different ways to cook eleni: you can fry it, make curry, or add some coconut for more flavor, etc. He even pokes fun at the rich, mentioning the cost of everything going up while the people still remain broke. He goes on to say in the song, "you rich guys can enjoy your expensive corn beef and pork, but I'll still be here playing my tin can of fish."

But, the song wasn't just revolutionary because of its lyrics, the recording production was unprecedented. There was nothing like it at the time, it was a new sound for Samoan music a fusion of pop, jazz and funk. The groove itself had Samoan people singing it everywhere they went, but it was sung by protestors during that time. The song was impactful in so many ways, and because of how it resonated with the people and became and instant radio hit and drew a ton of attention to the entire album, “Ava”.

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Location

House of Blues Foundation Room

400 Disney Way

#Suite 337

Anaheim, CA 92802

View Map

Refund Policy

No Refunds

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