DressCoded: Black Girls, Bodies & the Bias Embedded in School Dress Codes

Event Information

Share this event

Date and Time

Location

Location

Lohrfink Auditorium

3700 O St. N.W., Hariri Building (2nd Floor)

Georgetown University

Washington, DC

View Map

Event description

Description

Please join the Georgetown Gender+ Justice Initiative and the National Women's Law Center for:

DRESS CODED: BLACK GIRLS, BODIES, AND THE BIAS EMBEDDED IN SCHOOL DRESS CODES

Across DC, Black girls are losing out on the chance to learn simply because of what they wear. According to a recent report by the National Women’s Law Center and 21 local students, girls are removed from the classroom and even sent home, often illegally, for violating strict dress codes. The rules aren’t neutral nor are they applied equally. Black girls and curvier girls are disproportionately targeted. Disturbingly, schools tell girls they must change in order to avoid “distracting” their male classmates, or to avoid being sexually harassed. These punishments interrupt girls’ educations and send dangerous messages to the school community that how a girl looks is more important than what she thinks, and that girls are ultimately responsible for the misbehavior of boys.

Join a panel of students, advocates, scholars, and educators to learn more about the connection between school dress codes, race and gender bias, and school pushout.

Panelists:

  • Nadiyah Williams, Student, Charles Herbert Flowers HS

  • Nia Evans, Manager of Campaigns and Digital Strategies, National Women’s Law Center

  • Richard Ford, George E. Osborne Professor of Law at Stanford Law School

  • Dr. Melissa Kim, Deputy Chancellor of Social, Emotional, and Academic Development at DCPS

  • Samantha Paige Davis, Founder and Executive Director of the Black Swan Academy

Moderator: Naomi Mezey, Professor of Law and Faculty Co-Director of the Gender+ Justice Initiative, Georgetown


Nadiyah Williams, Charles Herbert Flowers HS

Nadiyah Williams is a senior at Charles Herbert Flowers High School and a co-author of Dress Coded: Black Girls, Bodies, and Bias in DC Schools. She came to the project with the help of Girls Inc. DC Metro and feels strongly that girls deserve to learn free from stereotypes, bias, and discrimination.

Nia Evans, Manager of Campaigns and Digital Strategies, National Women’s Law Center

Nia Evans is a Manager of Campaigns and Digital Strategies at the National Women’s Law Center, where she builds community coalitions to address school pushout. In this role, she spearheaded Dress Coded: Black Girls, Bodies, and Bias in DC Schools in partnership with 21 students who live and learn in DC. Prior to joining NWLC, Nia served as a Presidential Fellow in the Office of the Dean of the College at Wake Forest University, where she worked on first generation student programs and faculty development.

Richard Ford, George E. Osborne Professor of Law at Stanford Law School

Stanford Law School Professor Richard Thompson Ford teaches and writes about law, equality, social justice and urban life. He studies the relationship between legal ideals and everyday life: how legal rights change individual identity and group solidarity, how public policy shapes bodies and fashion, how legal rules affect cities and architecture. His scholarship combines social criticism, history and jurisprudence and he writes for both popular readers and for academic and legal specialists. He is currently working on a book about dress codes.

Dr. Melissa Kim, Deputy Chancellor of Social, Emotional, and Academic Development at DCPS

As the incoming Deputy Chancellor of Social, Emotional, and Academic Development, Dr. Melissa Kim leads the district’s instructional, leadership, and equity initiatives to ensure that DCPS provides rich and rigorous experiences for all students. She has been an educator in DC for more than 20 years, and she previously served as Chief Academic Officer for KIPP DC, where she worked closely with secondary schools and special education services to ensure student success. Prior to that, Dr. Kim worked as a partner at NewSchools Venture Fund and the principal of DCPS’ Deal Middle School.

Samantha Paige Davis, Founder and Executive Director of the Black Swan Academy

Samantha Paige Davis is an advocate, trainer, speaker, organizer, and unyielding optimist. She believes that everyone has the innate ability to succeed, but they must be given the opportunity to do so. When she was just 25, Samantha founded The Black Swan Academy (BSA), non-profit organization that is creating pipeline to civic leadership for Black youth. She is also the field engagement manager for YWCA USA, where she has developed a new state-level advocacy initiative and mobilizes over 200 associations. Samantha volunteers with the Greater Washington Urban League. Her work has been recognized by Boys & Girls Club of Greater Washington, Brightest Young Things, and the Urban League.

To find out more, check out NWLC's report "DRESS CODED: Black Girls, Bodies, and Bias in D.C. Schools"


FAQs

Are there ID or minimum age requirements to enter the event?

No! Students especially welcome.

What are my transportation/parking options for getting to and from the event?

https://transportation.georgetown.edu/Driving-and-Parking


Date and Time

Location

Lohrfink Auditorium

3700 O St. N.W., Hariri Building (2nd Floor)

Georgetown University

Washington, DC

View Map

Save This Event

Event Saved