$100 – $180

DC -- Masterclass on Alsace: Guest Speaker, Advanced-Level Sommelier, Pasca...

Event Information

Share this event

Date and Time

Location

Location

Cork & Fork DC

1522 14th St NW

Washington, DC 20005

View Map

Refund Policy

Refund Policy

Refunds up to 7 days before event

Friends Who Are Going
Event description

Description

Cork & Fork is honored to begin the 2018 wine Masterclass program with a two-part series offered by Certified Sommelier, Advanced-Level, Pascal Salvadori.

Part One: Alsace -- January 11, 2017

Part Two: Burgundy -- January 25, 2017

Guests welcome to attend only one class.

Cost for both classes $180.00

Cost for one class $100.00


About the speaker, Pascal Salvadori

Pascal Salvadori is one of only 236 people in the world who have received the Advanced Level Sommelier Certificate from the Court of Master Sommeliers. When Pascal Salvadori graduated from the Court of Master Sommeliers, there were only 23 graduates of the course from the USA and Canada. During the three-day examination, these individuals demonstrated an advanced understanding of wine theory and the beverage service industry, as well as a highly sophisticated tasting ability. With this achievement, only one challenging step remains before Pascal can earn the coveted title of Master Sommelier.

About the Court of Master Sommeliers

The Court of Master Sommeliers was established in England in 1977 to encourage improved standards of beverage knowledge and service in hotels and restaurants. The first Master Sommelier Diploma Exam to be held in the United States was in 1987. The title Master Sommelier marks the highest recognition of wine and spirits knowledge, beverage service abilities, and professionalism in the hospitality trade. Education was then, and remains today, the Court’s charter. There are four stages involved in attaining the top qualifications of Master Sommelier: 1) Introductory Sommelier Course; 2) Certified Sommelier Exam; 3) Advanced Sommelier Course; and 4) Master Sommelier Diploma.

There are 149 professionals who have earned the title of Master Sommelier as part of the Americas chapter since the organization’s inception. Of those, 125 are men and 24 are women.

About the Classes

Part One: January 11, 2018 – Alsace (7:30 PM – 9 PM)

A land of contrasts, Alsace enjoys a great diversity of terroirs and landscapes. Gifted for its vine culture, it is endowed with a dry and temperate climate, complex geology, favorable soils and an ideal exposure for its vineyards.

Its geographic situation, at the intersection between Germanic and Roman influences, tells its own story: a culture dating from the Roman era, revitalized by Merovingians and Carolingians who consumed great quantities of what they referred to as “this stimulating tonic that makes you happy”. By the end of the first millennium, 160 Alsace villages were already growing vines and, by the Middle Ages, the wines of Alsace were among the most highly prized in all of Europe.

Winegrowing in Alsace reached its peak in the 16th century. This period of prosperity was brutally interrupted by the Thirty Years’ War (1618-1648), which devastated the region. Pillaged, depopulated and ravaged by disease, all commercial activity declined dramatically. The re-birth of viticulture in Alsace came three centuries later, after the First World War, when winegrowers adopted a policy of “quality first” and decided to produce wines only from the regional, high-quality grape varieties.

From 1945 onwards, this policy was reinforced by delimitation of the vineyard area, and by the strict enforcement of legislation regarding production and vinification. Finally, these efforts were officially rewarded with Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée status: AOC Alsace in 1962, AOC Alsace Grand Cru in 1975 and AOC Crémant d’Alsace in 1976. Today, joined together by the CIVA*, producers and negociants alike combine their efforts to promote the overall image of Alsace wines throughout the world.

Situated on the Vosgian foothills, at an altitude of 200 to 400m the vineyards take maximum advantage of their exposure to the sun, particularly as the vines are trained along high wires.

These specific advantages of the Alsace vineyards encourage the slow, extended ripening of the grapes, resulting in elegant, complex aromas and flavors.

The geology of Alsace is a veritable mosaic of soils, made up of granite, limestone, schist and sandstone. Such a wide variety of soils, covering about 15,000 hectares, helps to bring out the finest characteristics of each grape variety, while the imprint of a terroir gives each Alsace wine its own unique individuality and complexity.

The range of Alsace wines is extensive and diverse, and thus choosing an Alsace wine is not always easy. During this class, Pascal will explore the region of Alsace, so well-known for mineral driven, elegant, powerful wines.

Part Two: January 25, 2018 – Burgundy (7:30 PM – 9 PM)

Between Auxerre and the Mâcon region, and covering just 28,715 hectares, the Bourgogne winegrowing region produces exactly 100 Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée wines. Among the most prestigious wines in the world, they are created by winegrowers and négociants from six different wine-producing areas, each with highly distinctive characters.

The Côte de Nuits and Hautes Côtes mainly produce red wines. As such, this winegrowing region is a paradise for Pinot Noir, which is used for the majority of the Bourgogne winegrowing region’s Grands Crus. White wines, made from the Chardonnay grape, are fewer and farther between. Some are also made from Aligoté.

Back in the Middle Ages, the Dukes of Bourgogne appreciated the lively temperament of the wines produced on the Côte de Beaune. They even helped boost the reputation of the wines, as did the monks. Back then, the wines bore the not-very-distinctive name “Vin de Beaune” or “Pinot Vermeil,” for the Pinot Noir varietal used to make them. Similarly, the name “Vin de Nuits” was used to describe all the wines from the Côte de Nuits. It wasn’t until 1936 that the wines were classified according to the Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée system.

The most southerly terroir in the Bourgogne winegrowing region, the Mâconnais covers a 10k-wide strip of vines 35km long, between Sennecey-le-Grand and Saint-Vérand. The region nestles between two valleys, the Grosne to the west and the Saône to the east. This is a winegrowing region with two faces. To the southwest of Tournus, the Monts du Mâconnais are a succession of wooded hilltops and little valleys, ideal for vine cultivation. Further to the south, the hills give way to a grandiose landscape that is dominated by some monumental outcrops, including those of Vergisson and Solutré. The vines can be found on the slopes where soil and sunshine permit. Here, perhaps more than in any of the Bourgogne region’s other winegrowing areas, the monks played a key role. The abbey of Cluny, founded in 909 by William I, Count of Mâcon, followed the Benedictine tradition with the principle of ora et labora (pray and labor), which drove the monks to create their own vineyards. It was, in part, in reaction to the wealth of Cluny that Robert de Moslesme founded the abbey of Cîteaux in 1098. Although the vines of Cluny were mainly located in the southern part of the current Bourgogne winegrowing region, the monks also owned vines planted further north, notably the celebrated vineyard of Romanée-St-Vivant.

Old documents tell us that there have been vines in the Châtillonnais for more than 2,000 years. Between the Carolingian era and the 19th century, production grew and the wines of the Châtillonnais developed a fine reputation. In the mid-20th century, after three wars, the phylloxera crisis and various economic upheavals, the vines were in decline. Winemaking in the region finally took off once again in the 1980s, thanks to the determination of local winegrowers. Today, this region covers around 250 hectares, 70km to the northwest of Dijon and 45km to the east of Tonnerre. You are here, in the kingdom of the Crémant de Bourgogne, a sophisticated sparkling wine available in both white and rosé. Some 23 communes of the Châtillonnais produce Bourgogne wines. The vines, which face south-southeast, enjoy good summer and fall sunshine, which encourages the grapes to ripen. With their roots plunged deep into hard limestone soil, the vines produce wines with subtle aromas.

Learn more about these two famous regions of France by signing up for these classes!

What to Expect:
This event is aimed to host a select gathering of like-minded wine and food lovers who are eager to share wine, stories, laughter, and friendship. We welcome you whether you are an entry-level wine drinker or a well-traveled wine connoisseur. The wines we will sample are carefully hand selected by our premier wine buying team. Please, consider joining us in the midst of a busy week to unwind and take a break from the routines of your normal day to sample some amazing wines while listening to an incredibly well-informed speaker about regions and varietals you may not yet have visited or tasted.

Share with friends

Date and Time

Location

Cork & Fork DC

1522 14th St NW

Washington, DC 20005

View Map

Refund Policy

Refunds up to 7 days before event

Save This Event

Event Saved