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CSH 2019 Symposium Registration (Regular Member)

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Location

DoubleTree by Hilton Pleasanton at the Club

7050 Johnson Drive

Pleasanton, CA 94588

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Refund Policy

Refund Policy

Refunds up to 7 days before event

Event description

Description

We welcome you to attend the California Society for Histotechnology's 42nd Annual Symposium

The California Society for Histotechnology is dedicated to the concept of continuing education through which you may increase your knowledge and improve your skills. We intend to introduce emerging techniques and provide updates on routine procedures to insure that the professional capacity of our membership will grow. We hope that attending this Symposium/Convention among your peers will encourage you to seek more information in this and related fields, and that you will become a more valued partner in the histotechnology profession.


Registration and Fees

Registration may be completed online* , by mail-in form, or in-person.

Online Registration will be open until 11:59 pm on Wednesday, May 1, 2019. Walk-Ins accepted at registration desk from 7:00AM until 2:00PM on May 3 - 5, 2019.

Workshops and lunches can be purchased on the Registration Form page (after you click "Register", then "Checkout"). They will be listed under "Additional Items."

* All online prices include service fees. See the Frequently Asked Questions below for more information.


Workshops

Workshop dates: May 3-5, 2019

Download Program and Registration Form (pdf)

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FRIDAY, MAY 3, 2019

Morning 8:00 AM to 9:30 AM

1. The Next-Gen Histology Lab: How computer Vision, Artificial Intelligence and Robotics Will Revolutionize How Pathology is Done

Timothy Spong

VistaPathBiosystems

Level: I

While the technology that drives clinical labs has continued to evolve and innovate, anatomic pathology labs have not seen the innovation needed to meet the demands of patients and clinicians. However, new technologies like computer vision, artificial intelligence and robotic could dramatically change how histology is performed in the coming years. This presentation will provide an overview of new technologies that will soon be entering the histology lab, how these technologies work and why labs need to adopt new technology to survive. A hands-on demonstration of a computer vision system for histology labs will be provided for attendees.

2. Immunology Basics and Antibody Production for IHC

Jason Ramos, Ph.D.

Biocare Medical, LLC

Level: I

This overview of immunology is designed to ensure all participants have a concrete understanding of the biological principles of immunology, how antibodies are made in cells, and the implications of cellular protection on diseases and cancer. Recent developments in the fields of cell biology and immunology will be highlighted to build upon knowledge attendees may already possess. Antibody production and isolation for IHC purposes will also be discussed, focusing on the benefits and limitations of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. All of the topics covered will be tied back to the IHC laboratory and protocol to improve basic immunological and IHC-specific knowledge.

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FRIDAY, MAY 3, 2019

Morning 8:00 AM to 11:30 AM

3. Introduction to Tissue Identification and Pathology

Ada Feldman, M.S., HT/HTL (ASCP)CM

ANATECH LTD

Level: I

Pathology involves the study of healthy and diseased tissues. Therefore, an applicable tissue identification course would include learning the appearance of both normal and abnormal tissue. This course will cover the tissues commonly received in a clinical pathology laboratory. It begins with an overview of the four basic tissue types: epithelial, muscle, nervous and connective tissues. This will be followed with identification of normal and respective pathologies of skin, gastrointestinal, urinary, lymphatic, respiratory and reproductive systems. H&E, special stains and IHC will be represented. The material introduced will assist technicians in evaluating the quality of their stained tissue sections.

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FRIDAY, MAY 3, 2019

All Day 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM

4. ASCP Preparation Workshop

Jennifer MacDonald, HT (ASCP), RT(CSMLS)

Mt. San Antonio College

Level: I

This workshop is designed to provide the attendees the necessary information for preparing for the HT/HTL (ASCP) exam. The workshop will cover the basics of the examination format and the basics of histotechnology. An overview of Computer Adaptive Testing (CAT) and the ASCP exam guidelines will be presented. Topics covered will include fixation, processing, embedding, microtomy, and routine H&E staining. Presentation will include photos of processing and microtomy artifacts. Special staining procedures and basic trouble shooting of special stains will also be included. Presentation will include photos of special stains. Stains covered will be taken from the summary of stains list provided by the ASCP.

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Afternoon 1:30 PM to 3:00 PM

5. The History of Hematoxylin

Jean Mitchell, BS, HT(ASCP)

Newcomer Supply

Level: I

The first step to diagnosis in the vast majority of tissue slide preparations in any histological laboratory, be it clinical, research or veterinary, is the use of hematoxylin as a routine nuclear stain. Hematoxylin may be a common product in the histology laboratory but its origin, discovery, historical, economic and medical background is anything but common. This presentation will focus on all things hematoxylin including its logwood tree origin, its history and worldwide impact as a textile dye and its discovery as a biological stain. I will further explore the pathologists and scientists that lend their names to different types of hematoxylin and the techniques they incorporated into our all-important nuclear stain.

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Afternoon 1:30 PM to 5:00 PM

6. Fixation, The Artefacts and the Special Stain

David Muirhead, AIBMS, AIMLS, MSA

City of Hope National Medical Center

Level: Il/lll

Today it is important for every histotechnologist/scientist to understand the stress we put our histological specimen through and how it effects the outcome. As certified or to be certified histotechnologists, you strive to produce the best possible sections and stains slides to enable the pathologist to make that ultimate diagnosis which will impact patient care and outcomes.

The artist in you all wants to produce that Rembrandt or Van Gogh, not the Picasso, you want to put your name to and be proud of. We will give the histotechnologist the tools to understand and troubleshoot the processes to be able to resolve the issues and prevent the artefact from recurring.

In a short time, we will cover fixation, its properties and along the way discover the impact and artefacts that can be extrinsically produces in the tissue sections and associated the artefacts. Finally, you will enter the world of special stains and your potential Van Gogh's.

'Always remembering every picture or image tells a story" Rod Stewart or "A picture is worth a thousand words' credited to Fred R Barnard.

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Afternoon 3:30 PM to 5:00 PM

7. Personalized Medicine: From Histology to NGS

Jason Ramos, Ph.D.

Biocare Medical, LLC

Level: I

This overview of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) is designed to ensure all participants have a concrete understanding of the biological principles of NGS, how the technique leads to targeted therapy diagnostics, and the process of how to get that end-result from FFPE solid tumor tissue samples. Recent developments in the fields of molecular biology and personalized medicine will be highlighted to build upon knowledge attendees may already possess. The challenges of bringing NGS into routine clinical use will also be discussed, focusing on the benefits and limitations, as well as additional applications (RNA-Seq). All of the topics covered will be tied back to the histology laboratory to improve basic molecular understanding and NGS-specific knowledge.

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Saturday, May 4, 2019

Morning 8:00 AM to 9:30 AM

8. Famous Cancer

Nicole Lewis

MilliporeSigma-Cell Marque

Level: I/II

Breaking News: 90210 actress Shannen Doherty files suit against former manager for health insurance lapse after facing skyrocketing medical bills due to recent breast cancer diagnosis. It's no secret that we live in celebrity centric culture hungry for the latest news about our favorite famous faces. This lecture will employ the fascinating world of celebrities to introduce the immunohistochemical panel approach to disease diagnostics. We will specifically use cancer stories from past and present entertainers, athletes, and politicians to examine the histological characteristics and statistics that define various tumor types. These cases will also be our launching pad as we take a deep dive into the intricate diagnostic world of tumor immunophenotyping by highlighting recent antibody additions and their impact on modern diagnosis. Attendees will learn the utility of these new antibodies and gain a better overall understating of how diagnostic panels are used by pathologists to provide thorough and accurate patient care.

9. Mastering Process Improvement – A Journey to Perfection

Mari Yang, DM, MHA, CT (ASCP) HTL

Hoag Memorial Presbyterian Hospital

Level l

Frustrated with change? Don't be. Change can be wonderful. Change can be scary. Most important, change is inevitable. Learn how to thrive in conditions of change by mastering the tools of process improvement. Become the positive disruptor and ride the surf of change to create better and safer processes for your department. Process improvement is an art form that can yield results, regardless of how large or small of a project scope. In this workshop, participants will learn the basics of process improvement and how to design and execute successful optimization efforts. Let change happen with you, not to you.

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SATURDAY, MAY 4 2019

Morning 8:00 AM to 11:30 AM

10. Part III: How to Be a Successful AP Manager/Supervisor, the Essentials.

David Muirhead, AIBMS, AIMLS, MSA

City of Hope National Medical Center

Level: Il/lll

This is Part III and last of the management lectures we have covered interesting topics over the last two years. We hope that this series of talks will have helped you on your journey of being that successful supervisor\manager and inspire those who are not to have tools to help them achieve their aspirations.

Today’s environment, it is essential to change culture and engage your staff at all levels to improve your workflow processes and engagement scores. Your engagement scores are followed at the hospital executive level to help chart the hospitals success in keeping retention to a minimum compared to your various peers in the industry.

Understanding ways for you to be engaging will translate into actions and language that is understood at their level is of paramount importance for you to be successful.

More and more senior executives are implementing surveys, i.e. Action-O-I, Press Ganey, Gallup and The advisory board company to access their divisions and hospital to understand the dynamics of what works and what does not and help to understand the psyche of their workforce. Unfortunately, the success of the manager or supervisor will be based on these scores. As a manager, you will be held responsible and accountable for your overall staff, their performance, engagement and ability to maintain and improve.

Therefore, being successful is understanding the dynamics of your team and knowing how to interact, motivate, and engage is of paramount importance. This workshop will give you some tools and direction that will put you on the road to success.

11. We Want to Implement Barcoding – Where do We Start?

Tim Morken, BA, HTL(ASCP)

UC San Francisco Medical Center

Level: II

Barcoding specimen and materials tracking in the histology laboratory has been convincingly proven to improve patient safety by avoiding common mislabeling mistakes. Barcoding also allows precise tracking of all materials and measurement of workflow down to the minute, which can help manage the work much more effectively. Your institution wants to implement barcoding but you don't know where to start or what it involves. This presentation reviews the entire process from the initial decision to implement barcoding to choosing a vendor, scoping out the project, determining timelines, determining budget, writing a proposal, working with the vendor and implementing the project. Special emphasis is given to forming teams and what needs to be done to improve operations before the project starts, interfacing with staining instruments and staff training. This presentation is not intended to give exhaustive details or compare all the current offerings of various vendors, except incidentally as examples. Rather, it informs you how to compare and evaluate vendor offerings and the process to follow for research and implementation. The presentation is vendor-agnostic and can be applied to any system.

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Saturday, May 4, 2019

Morning 10:00 AM to 11:30 AM

12. Controlling the H&E Stain

Ada Feldman, M.S., HT/HTL (ASCP)CM

ANATECH LTD

Level: II

When your hematoxylin or eosin colors are too intense or too weak you may believe that adjusting the staining time is the only option. Understanding the chemical interaction of hematoxylin or eosin stain with their ancillary solutions helps in acquiring the correct colors. With hematoxylin both the acid alcohol and the bluing solution affects the staining behavior on the tissue section. Eosin staining intensity is effected partly by the alcohol rinses. This lecture will give you a chemical review of these solutions that can provide a perfect hematoxylin and eosin look when they are used correctly.

13. From Manual to Automation: A Look at the Evolution of Histology

Joshua Greenlee, MBA, HTL(ASCP)cm

Sakura Finetek USA, Inc.

Level: I

Compared to other areas of the laboratory, the discipline of Histology has been slow to evolve in terms of automated equipment and its related processes. Walking through the average general laboratory side of a hospital or reference lab is a trip through a technological wonderland filled with modern analyzers with whirring robotics and buzzing computers. What one finds strolling through most Histology laboratories is exactly the opposite, with sometimes outdated equipment that could be decades old. With experienced Histotechnologists sometimes difficult to find, turnaround times and quality expectations increasing, and advancing diagnostic processes like molecular and digital image analysis on the rise, automation and its related processes are rapidly becoming a necessity. In this workshop, we will review some of the familiar manual Histology equipment and techniques and introduce some of the related modern automated equipment and processes. Finally, we will review how these new automated systems can impact the workflow and function of a laboratory versus their conventional manual counterparts.

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Saturday, May 4, 2019

Afternoon 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM

14. The Name of Stains

Jean Mitchell, BS, HT(ASCP)

Newcomer Supply

Level: I

This presentation will focus on "the names of the stains", and an introductory lesson in histology history. Harris, Gomori, Gill, Mayer and Van Gieson are common stains and names spoken on a daily basis by histologists in their every-day working laboratory environment. But what do we really know about the names and these people we talk about every day? I will explore a name, add a face and detail the history to “the names of the stains” that have been our friends for many years but have never been formally introduced to. Isn’t it about time we got to know them better?

15. Unleashing Your Leadership Potential

Mari Yang, DM, MHA, CT (ASCP) HTL

Hoag Memorial Presbyterian Hospital

Level l

Leadership success in healthcare is more accessible than you think. For the emerging leader, the most helpful piece of advice is how to get from here to (insert desired leadership title). If you’re looking for a magic recipe, chances are you won’t find one. With the right perspective, you'll discover that you too, can readily step into the role of a leader. By attending this workshop, you will gain insights that can help strengthen your leadership style, regardless of where you’re leading from. Study the leadership superpowers so that you can begin your leadership journey today. Your profession in healthcare is an answer to a calling. Are you ready to reveal the leader in you.

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Saturday, May 4, 2019

Afternoon 2:00 PM to 5:15 PM

16. What to Expect when You're Inspecting

Patricia Neder-Eckman, BS, HT(ASCP)

SCPMG Regional Reference Laboratory

Level: II

This course will cover two perspectives of the CAP inspection process. The first position will be from the inspector point of view. The course will cover how to prepare to inspect a histology laboratory, inspector requirements, citing deficiencies, and tips for inspection day. This material will be based on the CAP recommendations. The second portion of the course will cover how to prepare a histology laboratory and team for a CAP inspection. Understanding the CAP checklist, tips on lab preparation, what to expect by inspectors, and recommendations on addressing cited deficiencies

17. The Art and Science of IHC (Wet Workshop)

Jason Ramos, Ph.D., Robin Simpkins, HT(ASCP)

Biocare Medical, LLC

Level: I

This basic overview of immunohistochemistry (IHC) is designed to ensure all participants have a concrete understanding of the total IHC process, from deparaffinization through coverslipping. The advantages and disadvantages of the different antibody types will be emphasized for participant understanding. Additionally, we will spend significant time discussing the various reagents used in IHC to maximize the effectiveness of staining. As the scientific aspects of the IHC procedure are being described, participants will be painting a representative stain on canvases to highlight the relationship between the scientific and artistic aspects of IHC. As the participants are painting, one of the instructors will be performing a manual IHC stain. All of the topics covered will be tied back to the IHC laboratory to improve basic knowledge and IHC skills.
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Saturday, May 4, 2019

Afternoon 3:45 PM to 5:15 PM

18. Validation and implementation of the BxChip method of processing prostate needle cores in the Histology laboratory

Jeanne Clark, HT(ASCP), Dr. Sunny Kao, Eric Miller, Betty Kuruvilla, Dominque Burns

Stanford Health Care

Level: II

The conventional collection and processing of prostate needle core biopsies have become time consuming and labor intensive process, resulting in increasing turnaround times for patient results. Routine submission of prostate cores can result in 12 – 16 blocks for Histology processing. The BxChip reduces the number to 2 – 3 blocks, significantly reducing technical time and supply expenses. In this presentation, we will walk through the process of deciding to trial the use of the BxChip on prostate core biopsies, the validation of the new protocol and the implementation in the lab. The main focus points include the challenges involved in the optimization process, the validation requirement and the stabilization of the process, along with unexpected issues that have come along with it. Each step of the process will be presented by the different parties involved – the decision and review by the medical director and validation and implementation by the Histology staff, to provide insight on the challenges involved and the improvements once implemented and fully incorporated into the workflow.

19. Pathology Laboratory Safety

Shirley Pan, MSHCA, CT(ASCP)HT, Caren Ann Echague Aguilar, BS, HTL(ASCP)

Dignity Health

Level II

This workshop will provide laboratory workers with safe work procedures and chemical safety information to reduce the risk of injury and illness. The topics that will be covered include chemical safety, biological safety, radiation safety, and electrical safety. Attendees will receive information regarding health hazards, routes of exposure and effect of chemical contact along with how to control the risk by using personal protective equipment when handling and how to store when not in use. A review of actions that should be taken to correct hazards and emergency procedures in case of accident will be provided. Guidance will be offered for setting up an emergency action plan for your department.

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Sunday May 5, 2019

Morning 8:00 AM to 9:30 AM

20. Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation in Forensic Pathology: Histopathology for Diagnostic Confirmation

Timothy Dutra, MD, Ph.D.

Los Angeles Department of the Coroner-Medical Examiner

Level: II

Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a frequent complication of critical clinical conditions, such as sepsis, shock, or obstetrical calamity. Most often DIC is due to the uncontrolled activation of the cascade of circulating blood clotting factors, overwhelming the inhibitory actions of the circulating fibrinolytic factors. However, there is another type of DIC, which is initiated by aberrant activation, and aggregation of circulating blood platelets.

By law, all accidental deaths, including those due to complications of therapy, must be certified by the Department of the Coroner/Medical Examiner. In this presentation, five cases of DIC examined in the Los Angeles Department of the Coroner/Medical Examiner, will be discussed, with demonstration of the utility of histology and immunohistochemistry for diagnosis and documentation of DIC.

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Sunday May 5, 2019

Morning 8:00 AM to 11:30 AM

21. Understanding Tissue Processing Protocols

Joshua Greenlee, MBA, HTL(ASCP)cm

Sakura Finetek USA, Inc.

Level: I

When was the last time the tissue processing protocol in your laboratory was updated? Most laboratories have been using the same set of tissue processing protocols for as long as they can remember. Many labs do not know where their processing protocol came from or even how it was put together in the first place. To some, considering a protocol change is intimidating because they have no idea where to start. New tissue processors are often brought into the laboratory only to be saddled with the same old processing protocols that could be decades old in some cases. Tissue processing is one of the most time-intensive tasks in a histology laboratory, and with the importance of turnaround time and quality continuing to grow; few labs realize that opportunities for efficiency gains can be found right under their noses in terms of updating their protocols. In this workshop, we will debunk some processing myths, review the purpose and function of the common steps and reagents in tissue processing, and finally break down the anatomy of a protocol and learn how to evaluate a protocol for opportunities for improvement.

22. Basic Principles of Reagent and Instrument Validation for the Histology Lab

Tim Morken, BA, HTL(ASCP)

UC San Francisco Medical Center

Level: II/III

The validation procedures of histology laboratories are under increased scrutiny. While IHC validation has received the most press, every new procedure and instrument introduced in the histology laboratory must be validated. This presentation covers the basic tenets of validation requirements that are required for any CLIA-certificated laboratory and may be applied to all validation studies. The relationship between CLIA regulations and the requirements set out by the deemed accrediting agencies (College of American Pathologists and Joint Commission) will be explained. Special emphasis will be placed on distinguishing the need for Validation verses Optimization and what is required for validation in various circumstances. Finally, the relationship between validation and quality control will be discussed. Participants will receive extensive literature references, model validation procedures and validation forms that meet current requirements.

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Sunday May 5, 2019

Morning 10:00 AM to 11:30 AM

23. The Role of Histopathology, Immunohistochemistry, and Molecular diagnostics in Treatment Decisions for Breast Cancer

Joe Anderson MD.

Level: II

In this workshop, we will review the role of histopathology, immunohistochemistry and molecular diagnostics in formulating treatment decisions for patients with breast cancer. According to NCCN and SCO clinical practice guidelines, histopathologic diagnosis of breast cancer based on H&E sections remains the foundation of diagnosis. In this era of personalized medicine, Breast Cancer has served as paradigm for individualizing treatment options. IHC for ER and PR has been routine practice for over 20 years. We will review the history ER/PR testing and hormonal therapies as well as recent controversies and the need for increased standardization and the development of ASCO-CAP guidelines. The identification of the HER2 gene and associated monoclonal antibody based therapies has brought with it the need for accurate HER2 testing by both IHC and FISH. Advances in molecular diagnostics and nucleic acid sequencing and expression analysis have further enhanced our ability to customize treatment options for patients. Recent large-scale clinical trials have completed to allow these techniques to become standard of care as well.




Hotel and Room Information

DoubleTree by Hilton Pleasanton at the Club

Hotel Direct Phone Number: 925-463-8000

Directions/Map:

https://doubletree3.hilton.com/en/hotels/california/doubletree-by-hilton-hotel-pleasanton-at-the-club-PLEPCDT/maps-directions/index.html


Reserve your room now:

https://doubletree.hilton.com/en/dt/groups/personalized/P/PLEPCDT-CSH-20190502/index.jhtml

Group Name: California Society For Histotechnology
Group Code: CSH

Dates: May 2 - 5, 2019

Check-in: 3:00 PM; Check-out: 12:00 PM

NOTE: The special room rate will be available until April 11th or until the group block is sold-out, whichever comes first.


Transportation

Self-Parking: Complimentary
The hotel shuttle will pick up at the BART Stations and Ace Train Station in Pleasanton.




FAQs


Can I update my registration?

Please contact Beverly Chandler at ba_chandler@hotmail.com. Otherwise, please state your request in-person at the registration desk between 7:00 am - 2:00 pm May 3-5th.

What if I have any other questions?

Any questions can be directed to kathy.hardy@sbcglobal.net or 408-772-8235.

Will I receive my CEU certificate at the symposium?

CEU Certificates will be available for pick up at the completion of each workshop for preregistered attendees only. Otherwise, certificates will be made available to you at a later date via email or regular mail.

What is the refund policy?

The basic registration fee is non-refundable. Refunds are offered for workshops only. Refund requests must be made by April 30, 2019. No refunds will be issued after this date.

Why is online registration pricing more than regular mail-in registration pricing?

Online registration is offered as a quick and easy alternative to by-mail registration. The slightly increased prices help cover third-party service expenses so that we can continue to offer online registration services to our valued members, vendors, and registrants.


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Date and Time

Location

DoubleTree by Hilton Pleasanton at the Club

7050 Johnson Drive

Pleasanton, CA 94588

View Map

Refund Policy

Refunds up to 7 days before event

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